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For those of you who disagree with this theory, can you explain why? I just picked the book up at the library yesterday & have read through the first 4 chapters & it makes SO much sense! Almost everything agrees with my allergy testing results. I've seen some of you say that you don't buy into it - just curious why.<br><br>
OR, if some of you have had great results with it, feel free to explain too.
 

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I believe it, for me personally, because it seems to apply to me. Personally.<br><br>
:)<br><br>
And my daughter (Type A and pretty much an accidental vegetarian, but the only meat she will eat is beef, which is supposedly bad for her) fits pretty well. My son (Type O) is very carnivorous, so that fits pretty well, too.<br><br>
My mother really throws a wrench in it, though. She's Type A, but diabetic. Considering what As are told to eat, I guess they aren't ever supposed to become diabetic. She *has* to eat meat in order to get enough protein to keep her blood sugars stable. Carbs are not her friend.
 

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This just came up yesterday <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=980927" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=980927</a> . Basically, it directly contradicts my personal experience of what foods I do well on, and has too many logical dead-ends for me. I have known people whose health improved following his recommendations, but I also know they switched from a diet high in refined carbs, conventional meat, convenience foods and take-out, so any step towards more whole foods would have done them good, IMO, and I believe it wasn't specifically because of following the blood-type recommendations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
There were a few things that I disagreed with, like his recommendations for canola oil & that he said that coconut isn't good for anyone because of its high saturated fat content. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"> Something else, but I can't remember atm.
 

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Basically it just doesn't have enough relevance. Our bloodtypes are so mish-mashed that there isn't really any use in looking to them for predictions for health giving food. D'Adamo himself basically retracted his theory in favor of looking at the genome instead of blood type. It's currently billed as a more "complete" picture. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"> I know he was writing a new book based on epigenetics, but have no idea if it was published yet. IMO he gets alot of things wrong, but as with anything else if it's part of your journey follow the path. You'll either feel better or you won't and either way it's information.<br><br>
I will agree with AJP that the reason most of these "diets" work is that they get people off the refined and processed junk. Anyone will feel better when they eat real food. I am an A and do not deal well as a veg from a metabolic standpoint (though I feel okay) and cannot consume soy in any amount.<br><br>
Really everyone does have different needs but in my experience your blood type has little if anything to do with it.<br><br><a href="http://www.dadamo.com/wiki/wiki.pl/Epigenetics" target="_blank">http://www.dadamo.com/wiki/wiki.pl/Epigenetics</a><br><br>
oops, looks like it was published!<br><a href="http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-GenoType-Diet/Peter-J-DAdamo/e/9780767925242" target="_blank">http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The.../9780767925242</a>
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>gilamama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12371429"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">i am skeptical b/c you need modern technology (blood work) in order to know how to eat healthy.</div>
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I agree. I think people did well nutritionally long before they could determine their blood type. I haven't really studied the blood type diet info, though--that's just my initial reaction.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>tolovemercy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12371530"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I agree. I think people did well nutritionally long before they could determine their blood type. I haven't really studied the blood type diet info, though--that's just my initial reaction.</div>
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They didn't need to. They knew what to eat because they (for the most part) were born and raised in the same part of hte world in which they had evolved to be in. Someone who was Asian would not have "found" themselves miraculously in Britain. The foods right there were the ones they were meant to eat. Since we have moved all over the place into different climates and ecosystems *and* been able to participate in importing/exporting this is irrelevant. I just think that way back in the day there could have been credence in this theory, not so much any more.<br><br>
Had things not changed so dramatically this could have had some merit. Not so now.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>firefaery</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12370198"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Basically it just doesn't have enough relevance. Our bloodtypes are so mish-mashed that there isn't really any use in looking to them for predictions for health giving food. D'Adamo himself basically retracted his theory in favor of looking at the genome instead of blood type. It's currently billed as a more "complete" picture. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"> I know he was writing a new book based on epigenetics, but have no idea if it was published yet. IMO he gets alot of things wrong, but as with anything else if it's part of your journey follow the path. You'll either feel better or you won't and either way it's information.<br><br>
I will agree with AJP that the reason most of these "diets" work is that they get people off the refined and processed junk. Anyone will feel better when they eat real food. I am an A and do not deal well as a veg from a metabolic standpoint (though I feel okay) and cannot consume soy in any amount.<br><br>
Really everyone does have different needs but in my experience your blood type has little if anything to do with it.<br><br><a href="http://www.dadamo.com/wiki/wiki.pl/Epigenetics" target="_blank">http://www.dadamo.com/wiki/wiki.pl/Epigenetics</a><br><br>
oops, looks like it was published!<br><a href="http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-GenoType-Diet/Peter-J-DAdamo/e/9780767925242" target="_blank">http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The.../9780767925242</a></div>
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I agree.<br><br>
He reccomends spy during pregnancy for type O. Screwed me up bigtime...<br><br>
I think bigger factors come into play than blood type.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>firefaery</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12372461"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">They didn't need to. They knew what to eat because they (for the most part) were born and raised in the same part of hte world in which they had evolved to be in. Someone who was Asian would not have "found" themselves miraculously in Britain. The foods right there were the ones they were meant to eat. Since we have moved all over the place into different climates and ecosystems *and* been able to participate in importing/exporting this is irrelevant. I just think that way back in the day there could have been credence in this theory, not so much any more.<br><br>
Had things not changed so dramatically this could have had some merit. Not so now.</div>
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i had the impression that population migration was not a new thing. Maybe in asia it is, i cant comment on that. But in general not new.
 

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migration not so much, but in general people stayed in the same climate on the same continent and when they DID adapt it was to real food, not white processed junk. There wasn't as much variation when the blood types were relevant. At least that is my understanding from my reading.
 

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I am an AB- but as to what I need his diet is way off base. I would fit more in his classifications for an O blood type.
 
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