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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have two wonderful cats - Bianca (3) and Oscar (1). B has had a fairly easy time adapting to life changes, but I'm afraid that Oscar will not take well to our baby girl due this August.<br><br>
He was a rescue from an animal shelter and came to us a sweet but sick little kitten who definitely had to get over some aggression issues. It seemed that when he was most feeling all loved up, he would turn around and bite DH or I. We've seen him through this, and now the biggest concern is that when either of us are at the computer or sitting down, he is all over our laps. He snuggles, he purrs, he HAS to be on our lap at that point. I am so glad that he made it past the aggressive stage but he is still a very instinctual little hunter.<br><br>
I'm simply afraid that when our daughter is born and I am sitting, resting, nursing, etc. that he will get too close. Any ideas or hints?
 

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I have a cat that loves to sit with me, she was stray before I took her. She actually hasn't sat in my lap for the last 10 weeks of my pregnancy or so, but she will be right next to me as much as she can be.<br><br>
I'm planning on having DH bring home a blanket after the baby is born before we leave the hospital so the cats and dog can smell it. Since our cats are more bonded to me, I think I'll let DH hold the baby and I'll help monitor the first meeting when we come home. I think you just have to be patient. The cat is going to want to sit with you and it will be hard, but you'll have to make room for both of them. I'd start trying to get the cat to sit next to you instead of on you. Just make sure you're not ignoring the cat and it should be fine once everyone gets used to each other.<br><br>
Also, depending on your cat's personality he may not even want to be around the baby, especially if the baby is awake and making noise. I know my female will take a long time before she feels comfortable enough to be around something that makes noise.
 

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That sounds very much like our kitten (okay, she's almost 3 but she's still my kitten) she was SUPER attached to me and only me before DS was born. When he was very small she's snuggle up with the two of us while he napped now that he's bigger and louder and grabby she mostly loves on DH or me while DH is holding the baby. She's adjusted a lot better than I thought she would although every time I come home you can tell she's looking around, hoping we returned The Thing That Ruined her Life to wherever it came from.
 

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It sounds like he had a little petting/affectionate agression. That's not a "negative" sort of agression really. Some refer to it as love bites, etc. Especially as he was a kitten, kittens are more prone to it. Sometimes when they're older if you overpet them, or they get overstimulated they will act like that. The main key is to just watch them and their body language.<br><br>
I have a boy like that, but now that he's been here with us for a while I know exactly what kind of body language that he gives off when he's getting overstimulated. So, I just stop the petting and don't interact with him when he gets to that point.<br><br>
Cats are pretty -- how would I say, "wimpy" to a certain extent...they are going to stay clear of something they are unsure about. Babies make jerky movements and cry. They generally are unsure of them and stay away. I started out with cats, and was a multi-cat household for years when my first DD showed up. Even my most outgoing, in-your-face for attention cat, kept his distance. It's funny too, the cats *know* when they're toddlers and are prone to less predictible behavior. Though, they now cuddle up with our older dc! Either way, of course I think that it's something that you just have to supervise.<br><br>
I also did set up limits. In our case, when the kiddos are young I close off our bedroom so the cats can't sleep with us.<br><br>
And, yes, obviously always supervise and don't leave the kiddos alone with the cats. As your DC gets older, you're going to find that in general you have to be more careful about the dc hurting the cat than the cat hurting the dc! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks ladies! This is encouraging and gives me some hope for a peaceful, co-snuggly future with both cats and babies!
 
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