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My 11 year ols DD is seriously interested in becoming a midwife. She has had a lifelong interest in babies, and I am pretty confident she will follow through and maintain this interest. I am looking for suggestions/advice to help her take steps in this direction now.<br><br>
What she has already done: watched a million births on the Discovery Channel. She has a pretty thorough understanding of reproductive anatomy and physiology. She has researched homebirth, breastfeeding, cloth diapering, etc. She has had positions as a mother's helper starting at age 6, but none currently. We are thinking she could volunteer at a day care center, but that is close, but not really her interest.<br><br>
What I am looking for: Any suggestions about books that aren't too scientific, but explain the midwife's job. I am thinking of <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Spiritual Midwifery</span> by Ina May Gaskin, but I wonder if anything newer is out? Also, I would like to think of a way to approach a local midwife; to ask her to be a mentor/teacher. I am 50 years old, and it has been awhile since I (or my friends) have known such folks! We are open to any other ideas too.<br><br>
Thanks, y'all.
 

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I don't like Ina May's book, only because it is so based on her version of spirituality compared to many of the other books out there and I found it very hard to follow compared to Complete Book of Pregnancy and Childbirth by Sheila Kitzinger or Heart and Hands by Elizabeth Davis (a great book, IMO). If it were used with other books however, to balance out and show multiple mindsets on birth, I think that might be ok.<br><br>
There's a very big list to choose from in the Birth Professionals section: <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=209141" target="_blank">http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=209141</a><br><br>
One thing I would do, (just if it was me) was start her off with the books necessary for becoming a doula. They give a really good look at the birth process and birth support, which IMO would be crucial for a midwife to understand.<br><br>
ALACE Doula Cert Req Book List - <a href="http://www.alace.org/CATreadinglist.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.alace.org/CATreadinglist.pdf</a><br>
DONA <a href="http://www.dona.org/pdfs/BD_cert/Birt%20Doula%20Certification%20Reading%20List.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.dona.org/pdfs/BD_cert/Bir...ing%20List.pdf</a><br><br>
I think you'll find a lot of cross over between the lists for ALACE, DONA, and the list here on mothering. I am not sure if the physiology stuff is going to be over her head or not (which you would know best) but I think the doula training books would be fine (not too overly graphic or anything but very good reading)<br><br>
I am not a midwife though, just a very educated mom with too much time to read and a dream of being a midwife some day when my kids don't take up all my waking hours <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Also, both DONA and ALACE have locator services for finding a local midwife, and if you're trying to contact one, I'd just start making phone calls and see what you come up with. You could also try the Birth Professionals area of mothering and see if anyone would want to help out via email etc.
 

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There is a wonderful book by Peggy Vincent called "The Baby Catcher."<br><br>
It is not technical at all, but a collection of fascinating stories of her career. Sort of a MW version of James Herriott. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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