Mothering Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
4,448 Posts
My daughter is five and still tries this! However, we do have a very strict rule in our house of no interrupting one another. We have many friends who allow even older children to interrupt whenever they like, I don't think they ever get in an adult conversation. It's certainly frustrating as a friend. It works my daughter's way too - when she's talking with us, someone else (other parent) may not interrupt. It does seem like we started really reinforcing this around age three, so it may be a little early for you. Pretty soon they start to understand the concept of "turns" (i.e. Amelia gets a turn with the toy, and when she's done, it's your turn) and so we started talking about talking "turns." It develops patience, that's for sure. It seems like even now though, you could start using the language of "turns" and etc?

However, my daughter is sorta tricky about it still and when my husband and I are talking in the car, she'll start singing REALLY LOUDLY to the point we can't hear each other. That also counts as interrupting, we told her, and it's not polite.

In the end though, she does a great job with taking turns in discussion, respecting people who are talking (kids or adults), and being patient while my husband and I are talking. I'm sure it's not fun to be the third wheel sometimes, but I'd also like to have a grown-up conversation too...
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,448 Posts
I do think that at this age they really can understand some boundaries, the concept of "in a minute" or patience, and learning some empathy for how others feel. It's completely possible to do it in a nice way, too - like Jen123's ideas. Or saying, "I hear you would like some attention now. I would like to talk to Daddy for five minutes and then I would like to talk to you." or "I hear you feel angry because I'm talking to Daddy, but we are taking turns, and after Daddy's turn, it's your turn." They might wig at that, but we would say, "Oh, I see you feel so angry. That's so sad. But I'm still going to talk to Daddy for five minutes, and then we can talk." Helping to name their feelings, while also teaching them to respect yours?

Or, talking about the situation when you're at the sandbox or some other non-stressful place. I had no idea, until I had my daughter, at how much even young children can absorb. Saying things like, "I notice when Daddy comes home that you pull the books off the bookshelves. Are you feeling angry at Daddy? Are you feeling angry at me for talking to him? How can we work this out?"
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top