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<p> </p>
<p>Delayed speech happens for different reasons:</p>
<p><a href="http://kidshealth.org/parent/emotions/behavior/not_talk.html#" target="_blank">http://kidshealth.org/parent/emotions/behavior/not_talk.html#</a></p>
 

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<p>Has she ever seen Genetics? The hit I got from everything you listed was perhaps she has a chromosome error of some sort. My DD has a deletion and a lot of what you say sounds like the older kids we have networked with. Especially the tone issues, the super content and happy, and the difficulty in learning. If I were you I would maybe go right to a developmental ped and seek and evaluation from them. Maybe they will have other ideas, but it is best to find out for sure. </p>
 

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<p>I had a daycare boy who was born with something called <a href="http://healthguide.howstuffworks.com/treacher-collins-syndrome-dictionary.htm" target="_blank">Treacher Collins syndrome</a>.  The doctor commented at birth about his ears.  But, everyone dropped the subject.  He moved along in development just fine.  A little behind, but nothing blindingly obvious.  He seemed fine.  Happy, content, never threw fits... he just existed in a state of constant happiness.   He was short, but not tiny.  </p>
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<p>He was weaker than other kids his age.  He had a much harder time stepping up steps without holding someone's hand.  He learned very slow, but he still fit in and was fine and happy.  He wasn't diagnosed until almost five.  He just didn't have many of the physical characteristics, except for the large mouth and small low set ears.  </p>
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<p>He went to a developmental preschool at a local college, and blossomed there.  LOVED it!  He struggled all through school, and lost interest in trying during high school, so he dropped out.   He works at a baseball field, he looks and acts normal for the most part, and he fits in fine with everybody.  You'd never really know he had any delays.  His wife knows, and she picks up a lot of his slack, but that's what we do for our spouse.   He does drink too much, and wonders if it's because he grew up in a drinking family, or if it's that he self medicates... but, then he shrugs it off and has another drink. </p>
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<p>Obviously a lot has changed in the last 25 years.  So, what was available back then would be considered outdated now.  I hope you can find some answers to you questions.  If YOU know something is not quite right, then you are probably correct.  </p>
 

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<p>For what it is worth, the only obvious physical marker my DD has is epicathic folds. Other than that she is the spitting image of my son. The only reason we know about her deletion is that she was a preemie and in the NICU where they ran all sorts of test to see why she was having apnea. They ran a chromosome test as a way of covering all bases all the while assuring me that there couldn't be anything wrong in that respect. As for the CP- a neurologist can diagnose that, usually they do an MRI. CP is a blanket term for brain injury that effects movement. Either way, best to know now- if something is going on you want to get the services and therapies you can get her in sooner than later. At 2.5 she is about to age out of EI and it is easier to start with them than the school system. </p>
 

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<p>I would definitely get an EI evaluation to get it at least started before 3.  She has a lot of things that sound similar to my son who has a genetic conditoin (Noonan's Syndrome) - specifically, the low set ears, low tone, small size, eating difficulties. A lot of genetic issues have a marker of 'low set ears'.  Does she have any heart conditions - or has she gotten checked for any?  How was she at birth?</p>
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<p>As for the CP, like a PP said, you can get an MRI done for a diagnosis.  If she had that as a diagnosis it would open the door for a lot of services as that opens the door for automatic qualification often.</p>
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<p>Good luck! </p>
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<p>Well, the physical/gross motor stuff you're describing sound very much like mild low muscle tone. That doesn't exist on it's own--sometimes the underlying "thing" is metabolic and sometimes genetic. I think you've got enough to pursue looking into genetics at least. That's an easier navigation testing wise than metabolic I think..at least more straightforward. And I think an EI call is warranted given your descriptions. If nothing else she sounds low tone to me.</p>
 

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<p>My sister has William's Syndrome and was failure to thrive and had lots of physical delays.  She must have had some speech delays too b/c she saw a speech therapist.  However, she had a very different look to her.  A lot of William's Syndrome kids have a distinct look - sort of elvin.  But I throw that out there b/c not many people know about it. </p>
 
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