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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been reading threads on this site for months, and have found great comfort in many conversations. Now I need to ask directly for help/opinions.<br><br>
At my DS's last check-up, at 9.5 mos., I expressed concern about his lack of interest in pulling up or standing. He is also not crawling yet. I was immediately referred to the local early intervention center, who has done a complete workup. We get the formal results Monday, when we have to decide if we want to put him into therapy. But the preliminary stuff we got in the mail makes it sound like they have found delays in every area.<br><br>
But, from my reading, he is on track with everything except gross motor. He will be 11 months next week. He is close to crawling (up on hands and one leg, just needs to get that other one out from his belly), has sat well since 7.5 mos, still BF 4x/day, self-feeds and chews cut-up foods, babbles, waves goodbye, plays peekaboo, puts toys in and out of containers, smiles, laughs, looks you in the eye, follows a point, knows his name, etc. He's not pointing yet, and we can't quite tell if the "mama" and "dada" babbles are associated with us, but if you ask "where's dada?", he looks right away. Those skills are right around the corner, and should be good by 12 mos.<br><br>
So, if I go to this meeting and they say he is delayed, what should I do? I resist forcing him to follow a "normal" schedule. He is making progress, just in his own time. But I also want to do everything possible to make him a successful kid/person, and don't want my principles to stand in the way of getting him the help he might need. The ped and therapists seem awfully eager to push him into intervention, and it is important to act early if there is a problem--but he's not all that behind.<br><br>
So, any thoughts to share? Am I just resisting what he needs because I don't want anything to be wrong with my baby, or am I resisting "the system" in his best interest? Anyone have experience with this?<br><br>
Thanks...
 

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One of my nephews didn't crawl well till almost 11 months and didn't pull to stand until 15. He wasn't walking till 19 months.. Now he is a very smart and active 5 year old. I think kids will develop at their own rate and as long as its not way late (like hes a year and a half and not crawling) then I wouldn't worry. Hes your son, if you feel that he is developing well then go with your instinct, if you think something is wrong than get help. Mommy instinct is probably the best gift a mother has. Don't underestimate it.
 

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Definitely go with your instinct. It is possible that the therapists see a small delay in gross motor but in order to get the EI services your child would need delays in three areas. With a few minor deficits your child could get services. Only if the gross motor delay is significant would you be able to get the services for just that delay. At least that's how it works in NY where I was working as a pediatric occupational therapist until recently when I had my baby (She is 10 months old now). If you feel strongly about your child not getting services then wait a little while longer and see how things go. If you don't mind services then look at it as a fun activity for your child. They usually LOVE therapy!
 

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One of my twins qualified for PT at about 4 months old when the ped. noticed she wasn't using one side. The other twin barely qualified and since I was bringing one they worked with both. The girls loved it. The woman played with them on mats, gave them different types of toys, made suggestions for games I could play with them, etc. She didn't push them at all, and when they were about 15 months she went on maternity leave and told me they were okay, but if they weren't walking at 18 months and I wanted to bring them back to see her again I could. They started walking at 17 months (about a week before dd#3 was born thankfully!)
 

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Although my son's delay was different than yours, I was still concerned about him being in the program, as was some of my family. They didn't want him being labeled. He was 18 months old and not saying much. When the evaluators sent their report, it said he was delayed in every which way. I knew he was on track for most of it, but I guess their standards are different than most everyone else's. Anyway, we entered him into the program and he loved it! He loved his weekly playdate, loved the woman that came, loved her toys! (oh yeah, my son ended up being diagnosed with hearing problems). After 14 months of "playdates" he tested normal in every area. Its fun for them, gives them something different to do, and it helps them. I was worried about it following him, or pushing him too early, but it turned out a good thing.
 

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I am the first person the resist the "system", really, and my 11 month old is in EI for very marginal delays. I have only good things to say about EI. I was worried about them being too invasive in my life but that hasn't been the case at all. They are just interested in offering therapies, and I lead the whole process, everyone defers to me and they are overly clear about this all being voluntary.<br><br>
It sounds entirely possible that your son is just fine and right on track, but having an OT or PT check him out and maybe offer suggestions can only help, not hurt IMO.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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I went through exactly the same thing with my first and he's just a late walker, nothing else. He's almost 2 now and is all over the place, gross motor is totally on track now. I think that these kids of ours specialize in one thing at a time- he's always been a big talker and it just took a while for the physical development to catch up. Of course, this is the child who didn't get his first tooth until 17 months! He's definitely on his own schedule.<br><br>
Trust your mama intuition. It will not fail you. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">:
 

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Early intervention can be great if you get a good therapist. No sticky labels that follow your child into school. Just fun games and tips that you do with your child. They work with you a lot more than with your child, giving ideas of more games that might help in areas he's slower to develop in.
 

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i have several friends whose children did not crawl until closer to 1 year. they choose to roll or scoot around instead. i wouldn't stress over it. i am a speech-language pathologist who worked in early intervention (3-6 years old) for 5 years. the birth-3 programs can be really good, but it's totally dependent on the skill of your team or therapist. they tend to focus more on teaching the parents techniques for helping their child. you might learn some great techniques, and you can stop the services at any time. to get the services, i think you will have to sign an IFSP (individual family service plan) which will describe the "delays" your child has. in the district i worked for, the IFSPs did not follow the child to school later - copies weren't even in the cum files. no one new which children had received early intervention.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
These are really encouraging comments. Thank you all so much. We have our IFSP meeting Monday, and we'll see what they recommend. It sounds like your experiences with therapy have been good, so that makes me feel better.<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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The therapist(s) who did the evaluations should be at your IFSP meeting. I would ask them specifically what things are concerning to them. For example, a pediatric PT that I know has always said that not standing/walking at that age wouldn't be concerning, but not wanting to bear weight on the legs would be. That is not something that I would have picked up off a milestone chart. If you have the initial evaluation report, read through it carefully and see if you agree with their observations. If it does seem accurate, then I would say that their assessment is probably valid. That's not to say that you have to do any therapy, but at this time he may be behind (and might catch up, but might not).<br><br>
We received OT through EI in IN. One thing that comes to mind is that the criteria to qualify for intervention is usually something like 25% delay in one area or 15% delays in two or more areas. If he was 10 mos when evaluated, he would have to be 2.5 months behind in one area or just 1.5 mos behind in two areas. If he is only 20% delayed in gross motor, for example, they may be using the other areas of smaller delays to get him qualified. Also, I was told that the PT evaluation tool here is very hard to qualify a child with at that age because of the way it is structured, so again, they may feel that he needs a little extra help and are trying to use other areas to get you help.<br><br>
Our experience with EI has been nothing but positive. You can take or leave any services you want. You can decline services at any point without penalty. They really don't care about the rest of your life, just helping your child.
 
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