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I do believe that dh would be on board if he was more open minded (don't we all wish<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">) The other day we were talking about it, and said, no, we can't because we're not certified teachers. I tried to explain to him the difference these days between being certified, and being a parent of the child you'll be teaching, but I couldn't get my point across in an articulated way. Any help from you guys would be appreciated. Did any one's dh feel this way?
 

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I'd ask him why he'd want to put his child in a public school system that, apparently, is churning out graduates incapable of teaching and guiding their own children. Not a classroom of kids that aren't theirs, their own children whom they've been teaching since the moment said children were born.<br><br>
It sounds like he has no clue about what homeschooling really is and can be. That's very common. Exposing him to other homeschooling families and what homeschooling really looks like can help a lot. That's what brought my dh around. Good luck!!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>~Calla~</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11551033"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">The other day we were talking about it, and said, no, we can't because we're not certified teachers.</div>
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I'd ask him what he thinks being a certified teacher means. Teachers degrees train people to deal with classrooms. They cover things that you wouldn't be dealing with in your own home, with your own children.<br><br>
Our state university is well known and respected for its teachers programs. Looking at the requirements, the education classes cover things like "technology in the classroom" "second language learners," "working with the differently-abled" and classes on making up lesson plans and doing assessments.<br><br>
This is our 8th year hsing and I haven't found a need for anything like this yet. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Here are my thoughts (from a certified teacher).<br><br>
As far as knowledge of topics goes:<br><br>
*** Being a certified teacher doesn't mean you have every answer in the world. For example, I don't know much about rocks, but since I have switched jobs this summer, I will have to teach a unit on rocks. How will I ever manage? I will go to the library, prepare lessons ahead of time, and learn along with the kids. Two years before that, I had to refresh my memory on basic chemistry. With a little bit of research and effort, I can now carry on an intelligent discussion about elements, atoms, mixtures vs. solutions, atomic mass, etc. You don't need a degree to be able to learn new things and to teach those things to your child.<br><br>
Why can't a parent do the same thing?<br><br>
_______________________________________________<br><br>
As far as classroom management goes...<br><br>
*** Teachers need to learn a number of strategies for keeping 25, eager to get outside and play kids, involved in the lessons those kids didn't choose. Teachers need to make sure that they can address the needs of 10 kids on IEPs, two gifted kids, and the rest are somewhere in the middle, all withing the same classroom, presenting lesson after lesson keeping kids interested and motivated. Some kids come overly demanding households, other kids come from households that are not interested in their child's education or general well-being. Do you need strategies on keeping 25 kids from diverse backgrounds interested and well-behaved?<br><br>
What a teacher does with 25 kids, most parents can do quite naturally with their own children. So no degree needed there either.<br>
_____________________________________________<br><br>
You should ask him about specifics... What is he worried about? What won't you be able to give your kids as far as education goes, vs. a certified teacher?
 

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Tell him he needs to stop interacting with your kids then. After all, who taught them to nurse, who taught them to crawl, walk, run, speak, eat with utensils?
 

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This is the way I see it.<br><br>
Teachers do not know everything. If they do not know something they look it up. Parents are just as capable of finding out information they need. Parents LOVE their children and want them to succeed way more than a teacher ever will. Sure there are awesome teachers out there but who is to guarantee your child will get one? Ok. Say my daughter is interested in insects. How could I teach her about insects? I could go to a library and get info with her. We could go to a museum together. We could look it up on the internet. We could ask someone we know who is knowledgeable about bugs. We could go outside and inspect them ourselves. There are so many ways for us to learn what it is they need to learn. As long as you teach your children THE LOVE TO LEARN and provide them the means to gather information then you are all set.<br>
I hope to instill in my children the independence to find information out on their own. Why do oceans have salt and not lakes? I hope in time I have taught my children to know what resources are available to them and how to use them to find out their answer. AND I want them to keep on asking. I feel that by homeschooling we will be able to accomplish that.
 

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Homeschoolingmama has it right on the money <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/heartbeat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="heartbeat"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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Life really does come down to that if you think about it. If you don't know something you look it up. It does not get much easier than that.<br><br>
I love how my kids learn and do not profess to know it all by any means <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br>
I do however look forward to guiding them on our journey and trying to enjoy as much of it as possible. Life is too short to send them away so soon and so young.<br><br>
Teaching your kids comes down to their thirst for learning and your zest for helping them learn. Just remember how excited your kids are when they experience everything for the first time. You may not have all of the answers all of the time, but they learn just the same and always come back for more <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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How about a book written by a teacher about why his family decided to homeschool!?<br><br>
Family Matters : Why Homeschooling Makes Sense<br>
by David Guterson Harvest Books; Reprint (Sept 1993)<br>
Guterson was a high school English teacher who homeschooled his children. It is this contradiction--schooling his own children at home, while teaching his neighbors' children in school--that Guterson tries to dissect and defend.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>SagMom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11551398"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'd ask him what he thinks being a certified teacher means. Teachers degrees train people to deal with classrooms. They cover things that you wouldn't be dealing with in your own home, with your own children.<br><br>
Our state university is well known and respected for its teachers programs. Looking at the requirements, the education classes cover things like "technology in the classroom" "second language learners," "working with the differently-abled" and classes on making up lesson plans and doing assessments.<br><br>
This is our 8th year hsing and I haven't found a need for anything like this yet. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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For the majority of public schools, teachers don't have to have degrees in the subjects they teach, just degrees in teaching. I say the majority because, for example, some charter schools have teachers who have degrees in the subjects they teach, but not teaching degrees, so there are exceptions.<br><br>
You are the best advocate for your child's education.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>milehighmonkeys</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11553265"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">For the majority of public schools, teachers don't have to have degrees in the subjects they teach, just degrees in teaching.</div>
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Yeah, I remember my high school French teacher was just teaching French because he was assigned to it. He had been a math major.<br><br>
Anyway, who says ANYONE needs to teach kids. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br>
I think most kids figure out nursing, walking, and talking without actual lessons. And my ds is going on to do math and reading the same way. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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The religious private high school my younger sons attended was a nationally recognized college preparatory school; few of the teachers had a teaching credential.
 

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My DH acts like that a lot. My response is "teachers are awesome in the fact they can 'usually' control or maintain 20-30 kids at a time, and get some of them to do and learn something. But I know my child best and want more than 3 minutes of one on one time than even the best teacher can offer.<br>
My Mom taught Public High School for 39+ years or so, and she is wonderful at it, but there is no way she could give the attention each individual child needs in any given day, or year for that matter.
 

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<span>The thread title made me grin. Not to diss teachers, but it's actually easier to homeschool if you're <i>not</i> a teacher - it takes teachers and former teachers awhile to realize how much different it is to help you children learn things at home than it is to orchestrate a classroom. Your husband couldn't be more wrong about this. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br><i>Whew</i>...I'm afraid I'm too tired to say much more right now. The movers came today, and I'm in the clean-up stage of moving now. But I'll put a link here to a thread that leads to a number of other good ones about this and related issues - lots of people's stories and tips, book and article suggestions, and more about how they dealt with these kinds of questions: <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?p=9539735" target="_blank">How to teach dh about homeschooling</a><br><br>
- Lillian</span>
 

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You know, there's actually a book called <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Anyone Can Homeschool</span>.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>phathui5</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11560063"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You know, there's actually a book called <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Anyone Can Homeschool</span>.</div>
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<span>And there are even Complete Idiot's Guide to Homeschooling, and Homeschooling for Dummies. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> - Lillian</span>
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>milehighmonkeys</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11553265"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">For the majority of public schools, teachers don't have to have degrees in the subjects they teach, just degrees in teaching.</div>
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Heck, apparently in Florida you don't even need a degree in teaching, just any degree works. My sister-in-law has an art history degree and has just finished an 8 month course to receive her teaching credential. She starts her new job as an elementary teacher in the fall.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Lillian J</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11561066"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><span><br><br>
And there are even Complete Idiot's Guide to Homeschooling, and Homeschooling for Dummies. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> - Lillian</span></div>
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Homeschooling for Dummies was the first book I bought. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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<span><span>By the way, many private school teachers do not have teaching credentials! I said <i>many!</i> It's always been like that. No need for them...<br><br>
And I certainly didn't learn much of anything when I was studying for my credential - most people who have been through the process will tell you the same thing, unless they're people who've somehow bought the notion that being certified teachers magically makes them special.<br><br>
I don't really think the folks running the teaching programs really have as good a grasp of how children learn as a lot of people would like to think. If they did, wouldn't we be reading wonderful things in the news about how well educated our public school students are - instead of constantly hearing unsettling reports of how poorly they're doing? Would we have so much of the Miss Carolina's <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lj3iNxZ8Dww" target="_blank">speech</a> sort of thing? And she's not so unusual. Do you know that a 2006 report found that "After more than three years of combat and nearly 2,400 U.S. military deaths in Iraq, nearly two-thirds of Americans aged 18 to 24 still <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2006/EDUCATION/05/02/geog.test/index.html" target="_blank">couldn't find Iraq on a map</a>"? Not that that they can't go to a map and just point it out - but that they can't even find it?!<br><br>
And "less than six months after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, 33 percent could not point out Louisiana on a U.S. map." This isn't just about geography being lacking - this shows a real calamity of ignorance and lack of coverage of these things in schools, or at least a lack of coverage in a way that gets across to the students.<br><br>
Here's a wonderful website by a teacher who's trying to stay on top of the No Child Left Behind craziness: <a href="http://susanohanian.org/index.html" target="_blank">Susan Ohanian Speaks Out</a>. As I just wrote a few minutes ago, I don't think school</span> is all that bad - a lot of people do very well with it - but it certainly isn't automatically any better either. - Lillian</span>
 

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This was what my partner and my mother both said when I mentioned I plan on homeschooling my children. They both seem to think that to homeschool, you either need to first get your teaching certificate, or you hire like a teacher or something to come in and teach your children. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"> so annoying.<br><br>
My mom said, "Why? You're not religious!" and I asked what religion had to do with anything and she said "well, aren't all people who homeschool religious weirdos?" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/banghead.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="banghead"> It is so hard being around close-minded people!
 
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