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I'd like to try my hand at some simple diaper sewing (I've made pillowcases and curtains, that's the extent of my sewing experience!) and thought prefolds would be the best way to start. But I'd like more absorbancy than those will provide, esp. using just flannel or t-shirt material. I know I can also sew coordinating lay-in doublers, but I'm wondering if it would be just as practical to make the doubler, microfleece top it and sew it to just the back edge of the dipe....If I did that, how many layers would be too much? I had thought about 1 layer of terry (like from a hand towel) sandwiched between a flannel layer and a microfleece layer. Would that work????? I'm going to do my mainly premium-sized prefolds like this, not the infant size.<br><br>
Also, I have a dozen existing premium prefolds I'd like to "customize". If I sew a layer of fabric to one side, will I need to secure that fabric along the two inner rows of stitching as well as the outer edges?<br><br>
Can you guys tell I'm REALLY, REALLY new to the sewing machine? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/Sheepish.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Sheepish">: I have tons of other questions, but I want to start slowly......
 

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Well, the thing that you have to watch out about sewing prefolds from scratch is the thickness of the fabric. Some machines simply cannot handle many layers of fabric at the same time. (For example, your doubler would be 3 layers, and I'm assuming that your prefold would be anywhere from 6 - 8 layers. That's a lot of fabric for your machine to chew through.) Some machines just aren't strong enough to sew that much material together.<br><br>
If you're customizing prefolds - assuming that your machine can handle the material - then yes, if I were you, I would secure the decorative fabric along all of the sides. You wouldn't want the fabric to wiggle around and fray. HTH.
 

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I hadn't thought of that. I want my pf's to be 6 layers in the middle, so that's 3 on either side. I guess I'll stick to 3-layer lay-in doublers then. Thanks for the warning - I don't have a very fancy or heavy-duty machine, so it's a well-needed heads up!<br><br>
Can I use a straight stitch and then go back over that, just around the outside edges, with a zig-zag, to secure the fabric? Should I use a wide or a tight zig-zag stitch? Or will it eventually fray if I don't serge it? Becuase honestly, I know what serging looks like, but I don't have a serger and probably never wil.........
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>bdavis337</strong></div>
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Can I use a straight stitch and then go back over that, just around the outside edges, with a zig-zag, to secure the fabric? Should I use a wide or a tight zig-zag stitch? Or will it eventually fray if I don't serge it? Becuase honestly, I know what serging looks like, but I don't have a serger and probably never wil.........</div>
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bdavis337, it will be fine if you don't serge it. I have a serger now but honestly, all the dipes I sewed before I had it are just fine after several months of use.<br><br>
You can do straight stitch, then go back around with a zig zag. Doesn't even have to be a really tight zig zag. Right in the middle should be fine. A very tight zig zag will be very time consuming too.<br><br>
Does your machine have an overlock stitch? You could use that too.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>calmom</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Does your machine have an overlock stitch? You could use that too.</div>
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I'm relatively new to sewing, also. I read in another thread to use an overlock stitch too. Can anyone describe it or try to type a representation of it? My machine has a lot of stitches but I have no idea what half of them are.<br><br>
TIA
 

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I would recommend using microterry towels that you can purchase at Walmart or Costco for your soaker. THey are very thin and absorbant and dry quickly. However, you need to layer it with flannel because if you put the microterry right against your baby you will have a rash problem.<br><br>
Erin
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>TrishWSU</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm relatively new to sewing, also. I read in another thread to use an overlock stitch too. Can anyone describe it or try to type a representation of it? My machine has a lot of stitches but I have no idea what half of them are.<br><br>
TIA</div>
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It should look something like this -v-v-v-v.... wait, I did it upside down but that's the closest I can come using the keyboard. It's a straight stitch, zigzag combination. My machine has four of them but my old machine had one. It's slow going using this stitch but I found it to work great! HTH
 
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