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Meningitis- in any form

Hepatitis A or B or C

Rotavirus

pneumoccocal disease

What else? These kinds of illnesses were just not 'rampant' in society, with vaccines for all 40yrs ago. i doubt they are 'rampant' now, altho more cases certainly have been diagnosed since then.. What made the uptick in these diseases change?

I never even heard of anyone in high school with anything of the sort...mono, yes...what i mentioned above, no...

now new parents are scared to death of a disease they've never heard of or seen ---thanks media.
 

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AFP

GuillanBarre

Hib

autism

aspergers

JRA

tetany

JPA

I lived in a large suburban middle class community with two hospitals. Let me add that my first grade class was full of babyboomers, with 57-60 students in one class, one nun - no assistants. We did line up for the smallpox vaccine. I got to stay out of line.
 

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I started hearing about hep B around the time that I started college and they started pushing the vax. But in while I was in elem-high school in the 90's I rarely/never heard about...

-food allergies (I had one friend that was allergic to peanuts)
-type 2 diabetes
-celiac disease

I have always loved learning about the human body and nutrition, and I also never recall learning about auto-immune diseases in health class.
 

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I started hearing about hep B around the time that I started college and they started pushing the vax. But in while I was in elem-high school in the 90's I rarely/never heard about...

-food allergies (I had one friend that was allergic to peanuts)
-type 2 diabetes
-celiac disease

I have always loved learning about the human body and nutrition, and I also never recall learning about auto-immune diseases in health class.
I also never recall learning about auto-immune diseases in health class.
Very true. Excellent point.

Diseases I do recall are rheumatic fever that one class mate lost a year of school from; having mumps, measles, rubella and chicken pox was a given, a joke disease. There was ONE asthmatic in my entire school and ONE diabetic that I knew of from 1-12 grade. One case of mononucleosis. One girl had a hysterectomy from damage done to her from DES. I do not recall any cancer cases; there were 728 persons in my graduating class. There were five high schools in my community, three public and two private.
 

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One girl had a hysterectomy from damage done to her from DES.
That is so sad. That drug was before my time, but I wonder what will be exposed as my generation's DES in 20 or 30 years.

To add to my list, I never heard of any behavioral issues like aspergers, autism or ADHD. We had a couple boys that we all knew were "hyper" and weren't easy on the teachers. I can't imagine what teachers/day care providers go through now. "Jamie can't be around peanuts or tropical fruits. Tommy needs to take his ADHD meds at noon. Ava can't have the chocolate milk unless it's almond or hemp and needs to keep her epi-pen with her at all times. And to be safe all snacks need to be gluten and dairy free."

How did we ever survive? One can't help but wonder if it's something environmental that has changed in the last 20 years. (What are they up to now, 70, on the recommended CDC list?)
 

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Meningitis- in any form
I never heard of anyone getting meningitis in K-12. I knew it existed when I got older, but no one I knew ever had it. Once I was getting ready to head to the dorms, my mom got pressure from the family doc for me to get the vax for it. Thankfully I avoided getting the vaccine. Growing up, the docs literally had to hold me down and/or trick me to give me shots, so maybe it seemed like too much work to take me in. :wink:
 

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My friends who work in hospital settings are more concerned about these illnesses.

In my village, of all the students eligible for school, there was one who was "slow.", probably a learning difference, one who was "special school slow", which was something on the autism spectrum (he's an engineer, now :wink:) one with a blood sugar issue (had snacks), one in a wheelchair (cp) and our 2nd grade teacher had accomodations for cp. I had a friend in 6th who had allergies...she was diagnosed with dyslexia after college, when her brother was.

In the same village now, and among many of the same people, there is a statistically average, which I would call "high" rate of autism, sensory issues and adhd among the young people. They are almost uniformly medicated by age 8. It is rare that I don't hear of someone my age with cancer and Alzheimer's...those are the big two. We are dying off before our elders.

I sincerely hope that I have avoided some risks for my children. I don't know what's wrong, but something is.
 

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I did not hear of rotavirus, hib, hep a and b, and hpv until well into adulthood. I am 44.

HPV, yes! I didn't hear about that until my third year of college. The rumor mill was saying one of the guys in our program had it, who knows for sure, but that was the first time there was talk about it. All through health class/sex ed we talked about stds but I never learned about HPV. I'm so so sooo thankful that I was out of high school before the big push for gardasil.
 

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Let's see, here are the things I knew of as a child.
We all got chickenpox.
I knew one person's little brother had ADD. He took meds occasionally and he was a zombie when on them.
One kid who was a few years younger than me died of spinal meningitis.
No diabetic children.
No peanut allergies (heck most kids lived on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches).
A few had asthma.
Didn't know of (and never heard of) anyone on the spectrum.
Only heard of one kid's little brother had cancer.
Knew no kids with any other serious illnesses.
Very few kids were even overweight.
One of my friend's mom lost her hearing when she was a little girl (measles I think I was told).
I do remember two girls that got cold sores whenever they got sick (i didn't know it was herpes until I was much older).


Other than the illnesses above, I didn't really hear about any other diseases until college, when I took child development classes.

I was born in the late 70s, so much less vax than today and we were not raised on gmos. Also, I don't think the attitudes towards vaccinations were as crazy. My husband and I were both delayed vax at the recommendations of our pediatricians (due to minor reactions to first vaccinations).

On a side note: The first time I learned about AIDS was in eighth grade. We read about a boy named Ryan who got it from a blood transfusion. I know it really scared me at the time. That was the headliner disease of the time.
 

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peanut butter and jelly sandwiches
When I initially heard about peanut butter and jelly sandwiches I was a bit puzzled. First of all it might be a bit of challenge spreading the jelly on the bread:

Then as you eat the sandwich you would need to be careful that blobs of jelly don't fall off. :grin:

Afterwards I realized that the 'jelly' was actually referring to smooth jam, i.e. jelly had been labeled jello. :nerd:
 

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Let's see, here are the things I knew of as a child.
We all got chickenpox.
I knew one person's little brother had ADD. He took meds occasionally and he was a zombie when on them.
One kid who was a few years younger than me died of spinal meningitis.
No diabetic children.
No peanut allergies (heck most kids lived on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches).
A few had asthma.
Didn't know of (and never heard of) anyone on the spectrum.
Only heard of one kid's little brother had cancer.
Knew no kids with any other serious illnesses.
Very few kids were even overweight.
One of my friend's mom lost her hearing when she was a little girl (measles I think I was told).
I do remember two girls that got cold sores whenever they got sick (i didn't know it was herpes until I was much older).


Other than the illnesses above, I didn't really hear about any other diseases until college, when I took child development classes.

I was born in the late 70s, so much less vax than today and we were not raised on gmos. Also, I don't think the attitudes towards vaccinations were as crazy. My husband and I were both delayed vax at the recommendations of our pediatricians (due to minor reactions to first vaccinations).

On a side note: The first time I learned about AIDS was in eighth grade. We read about a boy named Ryan who got it from a blood transfusion. I know it really scared me at the time. That was the headliner disease of the time.
Ryan White. Rest in peace...they were a brave family. <3

I worked trying to get funding for research and doing education around HIV before we even had the name AIDS. It was a difficult time.

And not one that would give one lifelong confidence in the ability of government to make compassionate and informed public health decisions, come to think of it. :(
 

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Meningitis yes in this case it was a child and happened in the 70s
Polio yes but only people I know from my mothers generation
Mono yes
Hep A yes but it was an adult
Hep C yes a relative by marriage has had Hep C for 30+ years.
My cousin was diagnosed ADHD when we were kids
My husband who's in his 50s self diagnosed himself as having aspergers
My mom was overweight from childhood

The only vax I didn't get as a child was smallpox, because my Ped didn't recommend it.
 

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This is the most likely reason that polio was only prevalent during your mom's generation:


Prior to this time there wasn't really an issue with polio, then suddenly a polio 'epidemic', when they were dousing vulnerable children with pesticides, such as DDT.

Similar to what we are seeing with the scare-mongering regarding the Zika virus, meanwhile they have recently been including a pesticide in the drinking water in Brazil.
 

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I went to grade school and high school in the 70s and 80s. I knew of ONE little girl and one boy who had cancer and that was a BIG deal, shocking even. I knew of ONE boy that had autism, again, this was a BIG deal as NO ONE - be it children or parents - even heard of autism. No one I knew had asthma, arthritis, food intolerances/allergies, diabetes, eczema, psoriasis or any of the other diseases and syndromes that have become household terms. I'd wager a bet that NOW, in 2016, nearly everyone of us knows a child dealing with any of the above-mentioned condition. I lived in a fairly big town and my high school graduating class was somewhere north of 700.
 
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