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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a better time of year for dividing/digging up to give to others perennials? I live in the northeast. Specifically poppies (which I know don't transplant well, mine were from a friend's garden and probably half didn't survive but the other half are out of control!) irises, yarrow, bee balm and coneflower. Only the iris and poppies have bloomed yet this year. Should I have done it early spring? Should I wait until the fall? Wait until things have all flowered?<br>
Thanks for any advice!
 

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Hello,<br><br>
I live in the upper midwest. zone 4<br><br>
I like dividing my plants in the spring before they flower. When I divide them I make sure to add food to each hole and water in well. Then I water the newly transplanted flowers several times each week (a good soaking each time) for the first summer. I also feed the garden beds a couple of times during the summer.<br><br>
I've also transplanted in the fall which works well too, as long as the plant is done blooming and it well ahead of the first frost (6-8 weeks) in order for the plant to be able to handle the winter.<br><br>
Also, mulch well regardless of when you've transplanted.<br><br>
Good luck<br>
Heidi <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I live in north Florida, so I know our seasons are very different, but I divide and transplant in the fall, so plants can develop good root systems throughout the mild season.
 

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Fall and Spring are probably best, in that order. But we tend to dig up/divide/relocate perennials whenever we feel the need (some exceptions to that) around here...<br><br>
I'd say that the poppies and iris would be fine to move now. It'll be hard to find the poppies later because the foliage will go dormant soon, and the iris (especially siberian) are soooo hard to kill. Just remember that any little speck of those oriental poppy root will probably sprout a new plant (dh once tried to 'kill' poppies by chopping them up...the next year the whole bed was overrun with them, like cutting starfish in two!!!). Also trim any bad parts off the iris tubers prior to replanting.<br><br>
The other stuff would be best to wait until it's done flowering, which would be fall. If you feel like you can't wait, all of those plants will probably live if you transplant now, but just not flower. They'll probably do even better if you prune the flower buds off so they don't expend energy on blooming. Stuff like yarrow may send out new buds once it's comfortable in the new spot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for your ideas and suggestions, I am going to divide some things end of August and the rest in the spring. And from now on when I plant I will force myself to not plant so close, I just love the full look!<br>
Thanks gardening mamas!
 

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You're welcome. Have fun. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I know what you mean about loving the full look. For the first few years I planted everything as instructed, then the pendulum swung the other way and planted everything way to close <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">. Anyway, I think I've reached a happy medium but time will tell.<br><br>
Happy Gardening <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/coolshine.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="sunshine"><br><br>
Heidi
 
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