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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just wondering if you all think I need anything besides my breasts to get started. I have some lanishoh and some breast pads and a couple of nursing friendly sleep bras, but not bottles or anything. Should I have anything like that "just in case" or is it better to not even have it around? Or maybe should I have something else to feed baby with if he needs it - like a syringe or something to avoid nipple confusion but get him some nutrients if we are having trouble?<br><br>
I am starting to get close - induction date set for 8/18, and feel like all the sudden I have all these loose ends!!!<br><br>
TIA!<br><br>
J.
 

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One thing I couldn't have survived without was a breastfeeding pillow. I have 2 boppy's and a homemade one I made before ds arrived. I had thought the one I made would be enough, but I underestimated how frustrating it would be to be upstairs and have the pillow be downstairs. After hauling the pillow around the house for 2 days, I splurged on pillows for each breastfeeding 'station' around the house. The other thing to consider is the height of the chair you'll be sitting in to feed. I ended up having a sciatica-type issue with my hip because I didn't have a footstool and was holding my legs in a stressful way for hours a day... a footstool is also worth the investment. I so enjoy breastfeeding ds... I hope you have a similar experience.
 

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An easy to use water bottle that requires only one hand to drink from, but is covered on top so if you accidentally dump it (or an older child does), it doesn't go everywhere. Ironically, the free Similac diaper bag from the hospital included a perfect water bottle with a plastic straw with a cover.<br><br>
A comfortable place to sit and nurse with an easy surface for putting your water bottle, food, etc. in easy reach. A nursing station, basically.<br><br>
I second the boppy. Check out "My Brest Friend" as well. Great pillow.
 

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For the 'just in case' scenario, I'd find out who the local IBCLCs are in your area, call a few, find out their prices, interview one if possible. So in the case of any problems, you can immediately access one without any stress. They are also a great local resource for renting BF stuff like hospital grade pumps, buying alternative feeding devices etc in the unlikely event you'll need that stuff. I found LCs prices varied a bit depending on if they were CNP's or just IBCLCs. The CNP's with IBCLC were too expensive for me but it took me a while to realise there was quite a range of prices.<br><br>
I say this cause I had hell trying to find out all this info when I was completely stressed out after a c/s, baby who lost weight....<br><br>
Also I'd go to the library and borrow some good BF books. I liked Jack Newman's book - complete or ultimate? book of breastfeeding I think it's called. I found it more practical oriented and problem solving oriented than The Womanly Art of BF. I REALLY wish I'd read it BEFORE I had dd. It was so hard to get time afterwards.
 

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I highly recommend you got to at least one LLL mtg while still pg. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/reading.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="reading"> The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding is very good to read. Forget the What to Expect books.
 

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I second Darylll's suggestion about attending a LLL Meeting -- if you find you cannot, at least have the number handy of a LLL Leader in case you run into a problem (leaders take calls 24-hours a day and do not charge a thing; if they don't have the information you are looking for, they have other LLL resources, including IBCLCs, that they can turn to for more help. Chances are, if the information is out there, your local LLL Leader will find a way to get it for you).<br><br>
Also be aware that some mothers find babies who are induced and then go on to need other interventions can have problems nursing. My first was induced. Things went smoothly and I was able to avoid pain meds and an epidural, like I had planned, but after 3 hours of pushing, they pulled him out via vacuum extraction. It took us 2 weeks to get breastfeeding down really well.<br><br>
Years later I met with a LLL Leader who was also a public health nurse and an IBCLC. She was talking to someone else during a meeting. She said when she knows a baby has been assisted, either through forceps or vacuum, she has noticed (and grows to expect) it takes about 12 days to get things going. I was dumbstruck, as she hit our timetable exactly. Of course that was just our experience.<br><br>
It is always good to have numbers handy though, for unforseen problems which may arise, or if you have a question you want answered. My experience and gut tells me if a breastfeeding mom has any sort of question, the longer it remains unanswered the easier it is for well-meaning friends and family and health care professionals, even the media and the mom's own insecurities, to chip away at the mom's confidence about nourshing her child through the breast. Arm yourself in case you need to call someone any time a question or problem may arise. Good luck! Your body knows what to do once that baby hits the breast. All you really need is you and your baby!
 

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All I needed was:<br>
* a couple nursing bras<br>
* Boppy pillow (so nice with a newborn)<br><br>
I wouldn't recommend having any bottles or formula in the house. It's so easy to decide to give them "just one" bottle if you're sore or tired or someone else wants to feed them...<br><br>
Do try and find your local LLL phone number or a friend who successfully nursed and will support you if you have any questions.
 

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ITA with wombat about finding an IBCLC (board certified lactation consultant) in advance. Here's how: go to<br><br><a href="http://www.iblce.org" target="_blank">www.iblce.org</a> and on the left hand column of links go to US Regional Registry (or international if you're outside the US).<br><br>
The La Leche League website has a link where you can look up local meetings; go to <a href="http://www.lalecheleague.org" target="_blank">www.lalecheleague.org</a><br><br>
Bookmark this site: <a href="http://www.kellymom.com" target="_blank">www.kellymom.com</a> for invaluable breastfeeding information. It wouldn't be a bad idea to read through the stuff about getting started now.<br><br>
I liked the My Brest Friend pillow the best, as it had a strap to keep it attached. I didn't like the Boppy.<br><br>
Also, if you don't mind me asking, why are you scheduled to be induced? Is there a medical reason? For a first baby, the average mom goes 8 days "overdue" ; ie 41 weeks is normal, not 40.<br><br>
HTH!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow! Thanks for all the replies. I feel like I have my homework cut out for me. lol But that's kind of nice because I have gotten ahead of schedule on the nesting and was thinking of refolding all the baby clothes a third time.<br><br>
Quite unfortunately, the induction can't be avoided unless I go into labor on my own first (unlikely since I'm being induced at 39 weeks 2 days). I'm a type I diabetic which means that my placenta is at a slightly higher risk of prematurely degrading and there is also a slightly higher risk of stillbirth after 38 weeks than for a non-diabetic (my docs are actually being fairly liberal with the 39 1/2 weeks - the ACOG guidelines say induce between 36 and 38 weeks). I was very depressed by the idea of an induction for a long time, but I have really come to terms with it now and I'm just excited about birthing this baby - however it ultimately happens. I think that's good because I was really worried about how terrible it would be for me to walk in with the feeling that I had already been defeated.<br><br>
I am happy to have the heads up on the 12 days or so it may take to get b'feeding underway if forceps or vacuum is used. Of course I'm really hoping that I can avoid all interventions beyond the induction, but I am well aware of the cascade effect.<br><br>
I am really committed to only feeding this baby my milk because of the corrolation between type I diabetes and not breastfeeding. Part of me feels like having a strong committment like that will have to help, but on the other hand maybe it'll put too much pressure on me... Ugh. If one could only know what it (having a baby in general, b'feeding in particular) would be like before hand, it would feel so different.<br><br>
Anyway, thanks so much. I'll definately check out those links and look into an IBCLC. And I'm going to my first LLL meeting a week from tuesday, which I'm really looking forward to.<br><br>
J.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> Glad to hear you're going to your first LLL meeting! The more you know and the more you read ahead of time, the better, IMO. Just FYI, though, even under the best of circumstances it can take a good 6 weeks before breastfeeding goes smoothly. For some it clicks right away and for others it takes longer. So if you hit the 2 week mark and you're still having problems, don't give up! Just make sure you get help at the first sign of trouble, if you have any.<br><br>
Next question: do you know what your OB wants to induce with? I would stay away from Cytotec if I were you. You may already know all about it, but if not, there is good info online about it.<br><br>
Best of luck!
 

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Lot's of great advice. I have to add that a breast pump is very handy. I used it to relieve engorgment and also to build up a "just in case supply" in my freezer. I never actually used any of the milk, but it made me feel good to know that it was there for whatever reason.<br><br>
My other advice to you is this. Believe in yourself and your breasts. You can breastfeed. For me I saw breastfeeding not as a choice. It was something I was going to do know matter what. Have your support set up. If you are involved in WIC you can get help from their Lactation Consultant. Also, LLL and here. Having a supportive partner is super important. My DH has been my backbone. We are here for you. You can do it!
 

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All I has was my breasts, lots of b/pads and I do have a pump..I also have 1 bottle just incase but I never used the pump or bottle until he was a few months old and then rarely..If you do have a problem then I would also cross that when you come to it..<br><br>
Good luck, and take each day as it comes..It is not always easy for some so don't feel like you are doing something wrong if things aren't completely smooth sailing to begin with..Ok..Just remember to make sure you have a good latch, drink lots of fluid, eat well and rest heaps...
 

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The only thing I can think of that I didn't see anyone else mention is rectangular pre-fold cotton diapers, or burp pads. Keep a few handy at each breastfeeding station, for spit-up.
 
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