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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone a raspberry grower?<br><br>
I have a 4x8 foot raised bed planted with raspberries. They were planted 2 years ago and have produced well both years. This is my first time growing raspberries and I am not sure how to maintain them now that they have filled the box. I googled a bit, but cannot find any info about dividing them.<br><br>
Do I need to dig them up and divide them at any point? Do I let them go another year and see if they still produce well? I have a ton of work to do in the garden this spring and would like to simply ignore them for another year and see how they do. I assume that they will stop producing well if they are getting overly crowded.<br><br>
I do some basic maintenance. I cut the old canes out in the fall and cut the newer canes back a bit to keep them from getting too long the next spring. They get a good layer of compost every spring before the new growth starts and I mulch them a bit in the summer to keep the roots cooler.<br><br>
I love the berry patch. It has been my most beloved garden bed. Maybe this year I can out run the kiddos and get to the berries before they eat them all. These children can eat a LOT of raspberries!
 

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From "Macmillan book of Berry Gardening", a great little book I picked up at a used book store, tells you all about different berry propagation:<br><br>
Producing young raspberry plants is extremely easy, but really not recommended because so many mother plants may harbor viruses. Simple propagation requires only transplanting the strongest of the rooted shoots into either a nursery bed for a year or directly into the garden...<br><br>
Last year's canes provide this year's fruit, and they are cut to the ground or even deeper following harvest. In summer, sometimes after June, or at the latest in winter, new canes are thinned... six to eight will be allowable. This way the planting never becomes too dense, and the remaining canes are much more robust.<br><br>
Shoots growing between rows or too far away from the mother plant are removed. Otherwise, only canes that are weak, crooked, or those that are blighted are removed.<br><br>
Finally, at winter's end, any very long canes may be shortened to 6 feet. Perhaps a few berries will be cut away at this stage, but the remaining ones will be that much better for it.<br><br>
****<br><br>
I know out here, most people won't allow cane berries in their gardens because they're like weeds. We have a volunteer in our yard that I'd love to let grow for the fruit, but every year I have to cut it back or it would take over the yard. You're very lucky to be able to grow them. I'm so jealous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wonderful info! Thanks cristeen!<br><br>
Sounds like I should have cut out a lot more of the new growth. I did get a few spindly, non-producing canes last summer which is why I was thinking that I need to divide them. We are in the middle of a storm, but next time I can get out I'll cut out some more canes and leave the strongest for fruit production.<br><br>
I do cut mine much shorter than 6 feet otherwise the canes look really messy in the winter. They just send up a ton of new growth from their nodes and seem fine. I spend a little extra time trying to keep the patch neat because my neighbor's dining room looks right on that garden bed.<br><br>
Yes, I feel really lucky that we can grow berries. I was worried about them running all over the yard, but I boxed them in and sunk the wood of the box deep in the ground. I do get a few volunteers trying to pop up every so often, but it has been simple to yank them out. Overall, they have been extremely easy and provide us with 2 good berry crops, one in June and another, smaller crop, in late summer.<br><br>
I always think I'll make jam, but the berries never even make it into the house. My kids nosh them right in the garden. I hope they remember lots of sweet mornings snacking on fresh berries in the garden.<br><br>
Thanks again. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 
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