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Do you ever put your baby on it's stomach to sleep?

  • Never

    Votes: 16 29.1%
  • Occasionally

    Votes: 14 25.5%
  • Usually

    Votes: 9 16.4%
  • Always

    Votes: 16 29.1%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dd would only sleep on me or on her stomach.<br><br>
Ds will sleep on his back, but is more likely to stay asleep on his stomach. I usually put him on his stomach if I am transferring him from my arms. I make sure the bed or whatever is firm and not fluffy, no stuffed animals around, etc...<br><br>
I'm just curious if most parents follow the sleep-on-the-back recommendations or not.
 

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I was rligous about it with my first two. my first could sleep in themiddle of a mosh pit, my second rarely sleeps. My third was beginning to show some of the same bad sleep habits as my frst until one day when she was coupldof weeks old, I left her laying on her stomach and she fell asleep. i figured i was awake, she was ona firm surface, and I could check frequently on her , no need to disturb her. She slept for 4 glorious hours. I experimented several times and she usually slept for about 20-40 min on her back and 2-4 hours on her stomach. I tried swaddling thinking that would help but she wanted her tummy (I am a die hard tummy slepper too). I decided to just risk it. We had no other risk factors and at night she slept primarily in my arms. Wen she was about 7 months old we found out that her constant conjestion was caused by a birth defect and the most helpful thing we could do for her was put her to sleep on her stomach. zgo figure. She knew exactly what she needed. Now she is 9 months and rolls all over theplace while sleeping.
 

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Always. She didn't sleep at all for the first 3 weeks unless she was lying on someone on her stomach. We are not a co-sleeping family so we thought maybe we could get her to sleep in her own bed by being on her stomach. She slept great and has been on her tummy ever since. Well now she rolls all over the place but I still put her down on her tummy.
 

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When I had my first (1977) "they" told you never to put a baby on their backs for the very same reason "they" tell us not to put them on their stomachs.<br><br>
With my second, I had to force myself to put her on her back......so she slept both ways, but seemed to prefer her stomach.<br><br>
I think there is a link between crib deaths and the crib mattresses themselves. But thats jmho.
 

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DD doesn't like being on her tummy for anything, even to try to crawl. There's no way she'd sleep on her tummy.<br><br>
But a couple times when she was new, I put her on my chest to sleep (on her tummy) and she slept a little longer. Only let me do it twice, though. After that, shrieking followed if I tried it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">
 

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My girls always slept on their tummies. I really think that SIDS is a socio-economic related thing - the major risk factors are 1) young maternal age, 2) smoking, 3) not breastfeeding, and 4) overheating (wrapping too snuggly).<br><br>
I think most cases of SIDS are unprovable negligence - either forcing a baby to CIO, thereby causing breathing difficulties (stuffy nose from crying), or just not responding to a baby in distress.
 

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I put dd to sleep on her side in the co-sleeper (when she slept there instead of our bed) until she was about 5 months old and could roll over both ways. Now she sleeps on her tummy, every night...I quit worrying about it when she could roll, push up, etc, and she sleeps so much better! She has always hated being on her back which is why we did the side sleeping thing when she was tiny.
 

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Both my dd and my ds sleep on their tummies. For the first few weeks after dd was born she would sleep at nihgt, but not during the day unless I was holding her. One day I laid her on her stomach and she slept for hours, instead of 10 minutes. I was so worried I called my mom and she said that all of her kids slept on their tummies and nothing ever happened. Then my ds was the same way. When I went to my midwife for my 6 week check-up I told her that Sam slept on his tummy, too. SHe said their was a new study receently published that said their weren't any less sids deaths with the back to sleep campaign. That at first there were, but it has been linked to an increased awareness, not the actual way a baby sleeps.
 

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During the day Micah sleeps in his carrier, semi-reclined on his back, and at night he sleeps on his tummy on my chest. I try to put him down to sleep at night, but he fusses until I put him on my chest and then he snuggles in and sleeps like a log. Why fight it? We both sleep better that way... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/sleeping.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="sleeping">
 

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Since she was a newborn my dd always turned from her back to her left side, and sometimes I found her on her tummy in the mornings. Now that she is starting to roll all the time she always ends on her tummy, but now she is 5 months old and I'm less worried about SIDS which estadistics says happens more in babies younger than 4 months old.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">1) young maternal age</td>
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I just wanted to say that I have never seen this listed anywhere as a risk factor for SIDS and would like to see where you got your information.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I think most cases of SIDS are unprovable negligence - either forcing a baby to CIO, thereby causing breathing difficulties (stuffy nose from crying), or just not responding to a baby in distress.</td>
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Yikes. I'd hate for any heartbroken mama whose baby passed away to come by and read this <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">.<br><br><b>seren</b>, you don't happen to have any more info on that study your mw mentioned? I'd love to read it.
 

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My ds either sleeps on his side or stomach. His ped told me to put him on his right side to sleep, but then with his reflux Dr. Sears suggested left side or even stomach. He cosleeps and will usually start on his left side, but if he's really fussy or stuffy I'll move him onto his stomach. He naps on his stomach too if he's not napping on my lap or in a sling (which is more common). My ds won't nap on his side or back - he is constantly reaching out to see if someone is there and will wake up if his arms reach out to nothing - that's why he naps on his stomach. For some reason I don't worry too much about SIDS during naps, b/c my ds just doesn't sleep that deeply during the day.<br><br>
I don't worry too much b/c as other mothers have mentioned - we don't have any of the factors that make SIDS more common - we don't smoke, breastfeed and co-sleep.<br><br>
Still I sometimes worry - babies sleep sounder on their stomach but according to the Baby Book - deeper sleep isn't safer sleep and it's the deep sleep that can lead to SIDS.
 

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DS sleeps between DH and I so I <span style="text-decoration:underline;">never</span> put him on his stomach. There's too much of a chance that he will roll into his Dad and might not be able to breathe that well.<br><br>
I'm a first time mom so I have that whole, "is he breathing????!!!" thing going on. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug">
 

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Jack's Mama: I have that whole first-mom, is-he-breathing thing too - I have it bad! I guess this is good, to be so (scared and) vigilant. If I ever put my DS down in his co-sleeper for a nap and turn the monitor on, I still have to check constantly because I can't trust that the damn thing is actually working. It just seems "too" quiet!<br><br>
My boy hates lying on his belly. The first month, he would (grudgingly) let his dad put him belly down on his chest to sleep and/or cuddle, but now he won't stand for it. He's a stuffy-nosed baby, so he often seems most comfortable on his side.<br><br>
Right now I'm reading Our Babies, Ourselves - How Biologoy and Culture Shape the Way We Parent, by Meredith F. Small. In the chapter on sleeping patterns and 'sleep across cultures,' as she puts it, the author reports that the U.S. has the highest rate of SIDS and Asian countries the lowest. Canada also has a very high rate. Meanwhile, Asian immigrant populations in Western industrialized countries (U.S., Canada, UK) have significantly lower SIDS rates than the overall population of their adopted lands - with higher rates correlating with length of time in country.<br><br>
She quotes McKenna at length, who believes that the Western habit of putting babies to sleep alone is unnatural - as 'Infant sleep evolved against a backdrop of being jerked up and down in the back of a sling' (quotes McKenna).<br><br>
I found this passage by Small on SIDS and cultural differences very interesting:<br><br>
"(...) Recent dramatic changes in the SIDS rate do underscore the importance of childcare practices in preventing SIDS. Originally advisors said that babies should be placed face down when they sleep so that the child would not choke on its own vomit. But a connection between the supine position and the low rates of SIDS began to appear, and the rates of SIDS began to drop once parents were advised to put the baby face up rather than face down. <b>There has been, for example, a 90 percent reduction in the rate of SIDS in the United Kingdom from 1981 to 1992 since the new sleeping position was advocated, and a 50 percent reduction in the Netherlands, Australia, and New Zealand.</b> The drop in the SIDS rate has been much less dramatic in the United States because this change in pediatricians' recommendations has been less publicized and less well accepted. But most pediatricians now realize that the prone position does not allow the baby to kick off its blankets when it is too hot, negating the baby's natural instincts to regulate its body temperature."<br><br>
The section I bolded is telling. How can a 90 percent drop in the UK be ignored? The correlation betweeen SIDS and belly-sleeping must be there (despite what my mom - who raised 5 belly-sleeping kids with no apologies - has to say to about it - and say it she does. Constantly!).<br><br>
The section goes on to talk about connections having to do with the necessity of light sleep cycles in babies (not the "hard" sleep possible on the belly), breastfeeding and especially bf'ing at night (and how bf'ing goes hand in hand with the back sleep position), and a study of Welsh parents and Bangladeshi parents living in Cardiff which seemed to indicate that the Bangladeshi's highly social and active family environment - in which babies were never really left alone and were almost always in the presence of one primary caretaker - had an impact.<br><br>
FWIW.
 

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I let ds sleep on his tummy for naps only, when we can watch him. He can roll over, though, so I'm not too concerned. When he was really little, I ALWAYS put him on his back.<br><br>
For nighttime sleep, I always put him on his back.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by phathui5</i><br><b>I just wanted to say that I have never seen this listed anywhere as a risk factor for SIDS and would like to see where you got your information.</b></td>
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First off I just want to say that I don't agree with her conclusions but I wanted to offer this link to show that Anmarie is not lying about seeing the whole young mother thing:<br><br><a href="http://sids-network.org/risk.htm" target="_blank">From the Sids network</a> : "Statistics tell us that seasonality (i.e. the cold weather months), <b>maternal age (i.e. the younger the mother, the greater the risk)</b> , and baby's sex (i.e. boys are at higher risk than girls) are among the factors which must be considered. Baby's age is another risk factor. SIDS occurs most frequently in infants two to four months old; nearly 90% of the babies who die of SIDS are under six months of age. We also know that there is a higher incidence of SIDS for premature and low-birthweight infants, twins and triplets"<br><br>
I think the age thing is likely linked to other factors but statisticaly notable. Either that or it is due to nutritional strains during adolescent pregnancy.<br><br>
Now, Anmarie, can you explain to me what socio-economics, ie income level, has to do with likeliness to be abusive/neglectful?<br><br>
MM
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Great points, Melixxa. That's a great book, I've read it too.<br><br>
Also, Chaja, I thought this was important:<br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">babies sleep sounder on their stomach but according to the Baby Book - deeper sleep isn't safer sleep and it's the deep sleep that can lead to SIDS</td>
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Some babies must sleep deeply on their backs though (or all mothers would be going crazy!). I guess it's just easier to wake up in that position if they are in danger?
 

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This is some of whay Dr. Sears explains about why young babies don't sleep too deeply. If you go to the link <a href="http://www.askdrsears.com/html/7/T070200.asp" target="_blank">http://www.askdrsears.com/html/7/T070200.asp</a><br>
he explains more about why lighter sleep is good for young babies and getting babies to sleep too deeply can be dangerous,<br><br>
"In the first few months, babies' needs are the highest, but their ability to communicate their needs is the lowest. Suppose a baby slept deeply most of the night. Some basic needs would go unfulfilled. Tiny babies have tiny tummies, and mother's milk is digested very rapidly. If a baby's stimulus for hunger could not easily arouse her, this would not be good for baby's survival. If baby's nose was stuffed and she could not breathe, or was cold and needed warmth, and her sleep state was so deep that she could not communicate her needs, her survival would be jeopardized.<br><br>
One thing we have learned during our years in pediatrics is that babies do what they do because they're designed that way. In the case of infant sleep, research suggests that active sleep protects babies. Suppose your baby sleeps like an adult, meaning predominantly deep sleep. Sounds wonderful! For you, perhaps, but not for baby. Suppose baby had a need for warmth, food, or even unobstructed air, but because he was sleeping so deeply he couldn't arouse to recognize and act on these needs. Baby's well being could be threatened. It appears that babies come wired with sleep patterns that enable them to awaken in response to circumstances that threaten their well being. We believe, and research supports, that frequent stages of active (REM) sleep serve the best physiologic interest of babies during the early months, when their well being is most threatened."<br><br>
However, my ds sleeps pretty lightly during the day - even on his tummy.
 
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