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No, I don't make my children "clean their plate." That is just asking for eating problems. I doubt there are many mothers on MDC who would do such a thing.
 

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No way. If I tried to "make" DS clean his plate every time we eat, I think our whole life would be one big meal. I try to avoid "making" my children do anything.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BellinghamCrunchie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6502576"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Of course not! I don't make DH clean his plate, either. Or the cat. Or myself. Or any guests visiting.</div>
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It makes doing the dishes easier if I make our dogs "clean our plates". They can masterfully and gleefully remove stuck-on cheese, leaving me and dh with a much easier job to rinse before going into the dishwasher.
 

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No way! It sends the message to children that they can't trust their bodies to know when they're full, and frequently sets kids up for eating problems/disorders in the future.<br><br>
I don't force myself to eat everything on my plate if I've mistakenly given myself too much. I also don't make myself finish my food if I've changed my mind about what I want, or don't have much of an appetite for whatever reason.<br><br>
I get a little "feisty" around this issue. I just don't get the idea behind "making" a child eat anything. Children will eat healthy amounts of good food, when good food is provided. Micromanaging every meal time is unnecessary, IMO.
 

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NO!<br><br>
My role is to guide my children through my healthy eating habits, providing good and nutritious foods and letting them decided what, when and how much to eat...<br><br>
~Charlene~
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
oh good, my MIL likes our children to eat all their supper, & we're going there for Thanksgiving. What you said makes sense, I just don"t look forward to all the drama. Thanks ladies!
 

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Nope. This is a big deal for me. My younger sis was made to sit at the table for hours, gagging down tiny bites of her cold dinner. Food became a control issue. She struggled for many, many years with an eating disorder.
 

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<i>It makes doing the dishes easier if I make our dogs "clean our plates". They can masterfully and gleefully remove stuck-on cheese, leaving me and dh with a much easier job to rinse before going into the dishwasher</i>.<br><br>
ROFLOL!!!
 

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Absolutely not! I think it's totally disresepctful to force food on a full or uninterested child.
 

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No.<br><br>
They are responsible to dish themselves up and eat what they take so they do not waste.<br><br>
We really focus on a little at a time....you can always have more <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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No, but they don't get anything else to eat until their plate is empty. It's wrapped and put in the fridge and they can warm it up when they get hungry later.
 

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I do not make them clean their plate but I will tell them they have to have a few more bites of vegetables if I suspect they are saying they are finished just so they can get to dessert.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Synthea™</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6502827"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">No, but they don't get anything else to eat until their plate is empty. It's wrapped and put in the fridge and they can warm it up when they get hungry later.</div>
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What if they don't like the food?
 

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Never. To me it's like force feeding them. Not ok in my book.<br>
In answer to part 2 of your question OP, I give them choices. A, B and sometimes a C. I take into account what they like and in my mind have already thought about the nutritional aspect of it. So that's how I arrive at the choices I offer them.<br><br><br>
DC
 

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Nope. We offer it and if she doesn't eat it than that's okay. If she's hungry later, she can have some yogurt if she doesn't like the food.<br><br>
Dh has horrible memories of going to visit an uncle of his who heaped loads of food on his plate and forced him to eat it. Now dh would eat a lot as a kid (high metabolism <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">) but he was positivley sick at the end and now holds a grudge against his uncle.
 

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Well, not exactly. But when my 7 yo ds was 4 and began eliminating meal after meal, ie. ate meal xyz just fine last week, but absolutly refused it the next week, we started putting exactly one scant serving of everything on his plate at dinner. So, maybe two tablespoons of protien, green veggie, starch, for example. Once he'd "cleaned" his plate he was welcome to help himself to more of whatever he did like. And now he eats a wide range of food once again. When he starts backsliding we go back to this method. We came up with this after months of him eating nothing but apples, cheese and crackers for dinner after trying one bite of our real dinner. It started to affect his sister too, b/c she would see him switch to apple/cheese/cracker and want that instead of our dinner.<br><br>
It worked for us, I don't feel that it was horrible for him at all.<br><br>
Now, we don't force them to eat when they aren't hungry or to clean their plate if their eyes were bigger than their stomachs, kwim? So, I don't consider them "clean plate club" participants.
 

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Nope. no clean plater's club here. Ds eats what and how much he wants. If I fix a meal, I won't get up an unreasonable number of times to get him something else, nor will I interupt my meal to fix anything more than a simple snack.<br>
But, even if he eats nothing on his plate, I will fix him something else after I'm done eating. Not a full meal, but something quick. He wouldn't ask for anything more difficult than cheese and crackers anyways.<br><br>
And yeah, nothing gets wasted because we have 4 legged garbage disposals. lol (ok, so I guess THEY would be part of the clean plater's club <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> )
 

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I remember my parents doing this a few times. I hated it!!! So although we are not there yet (I have a 13 month old) I wouldn't make my DD clean her plate. I think it is healthy to recognizing being full and stop eating. I had this conversation with my SIL who says after years of having to clean her plate she has to reminder herself now not to clean her plate! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 
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