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I just got all my seeds and we dug out a garden spot today. I am excited but not really sure what to do next. Our last frost date is supposed to be April 28th. I planted lettuce and spinach seeds today b/c the package said to do that before the frost. All the other packages (peas, cukes, pumpkins, green beans) say I can plant them in the ground. Will I have better luck if I start them indoors? Also I would like to mulch my garden to keep out the weeds. How do you mark where you planted your seeds? Sorry for so many questions but I am just a beginner.
 

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I started my tomatoes, peppers, herbs and such indoors a few weeks ago. Started my artichokes, too, but come to find out I should've started those in February, but oh well. Supposedly our last frost date is May 15th, but I'm waiting until Memorial Day weekend because I'm cautious like that. And I always remember some freezing weather up to about then anyway (one benefit to living in the same area for a long time).<br><br>
Some things just don't transplant well... I forget which ones though. I think beans is one of them. Cilantro's another, but I'm tempting fate and started some indoors anyway. We'll see what happens. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
You could mark where you plant with popscicle sticks or straws or whatever else you've got on hand. That might work temporarily until you get little seedlings. Happy growing!<br><br><br>
ETA: I'm in zone 5, in the Inland Northwest. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I plant mine outdoors, but in small peat pots. When the seedlings are big enough, the entire thing goes in the ground.<br><br>
The exception to this rule for us is herbs and carrots. They go directly in the raised beds.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Kamie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7922964"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I just got all my seeds and we dug out a garden spot today. I am excited but not really sure what to do next. Our last frost date is supposed to be April 28th. I planted lettuce and spinach seeds today b/c the package said to do that before the frost. All the other packages (peas, cukes, pumpkins, green beans) say I can plant them in the ground. Will I have better luck if I start them indoors? Also I would like to mulch my garden to keep out the weeds. How do you mark where you planted your seeds? Sorry for so many questions but I am just a beginner.</div>
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Leaf lettuce is best directly sown into the grown, but head lettuce usually does better as a transplant. Leaf lettuce, spinach, and peas can all be diretly sown in cool weather. My leaf lettuce and peas survived several nights of 18 degree weather! Green beans are usually directly sown about a week after the last frost date. Cucumbers and pumpkins are usually directly sown a couple weeks after the last frost date, but they can be started indoors 2-3 weeks early for a headstart. Hope that helps!
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Jennisee</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7930613"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Leaf lettuce is best directly sown into the grown, but head lettuce usually does better as a transplant. Leaf lettuce, spinach, and peas can all be diretly sown in cool weather. My leaf lettuce and peas survived several nights of 18 degree weather! Green beans are usually directly sown about a week after the last frost date. Cucumbers and pumpkins are usually directly sown a couple weeks after the last frost date, but they can be started indoors 2-3 weeks early for a headstart. Hope that helps!</div>
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Hey! My DH grew up in Washington...just outside of Peoria. His Mom (MIL) does so much gardening...I heard about the cold snap up there!<br><br>
Just saying hello!
 

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Hi, devster4fun! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wave.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wave"> Peoria is actually 2 hours north of me, but we all got the same cold snap. It really did a number on people's gardens.
 
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