Mothering Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(x-posted a few days ago in Nutrition and Good Eating)<br><br>
Having recently discovered that I'm allergic to dairy, I've been thinking a lot about calcium, and where to obtain it in my diet (as well as for my kids). When I looked at which foods have calcium and their relative quantities, it seems to me like the USA's RDAs can only be feasibly met with large quantities of dairy, or through supplementation. What is your opinion on the need for calcium in one's diet? Should I start supplementing myself (and my kids)? What kind of foods did non-dairy traditional folk eat that satisfied their calcium requirements? Should I even be concerned about it - I often wonder if such a high RDA is really just a nod to the dairy council. Thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,249 Posts
The RDA is only 1000 mg per day. You can get that with a cup of collard greens, a cup of cooked rhubarb, and a couple oz of sardines. Greens and canned fish (bones included) are excellent sources of calcium, as are bone broths properly prepared, and beans. All these have probably better mineral content and balances overall than dairy products.<br><br>
It's arguable whether calcium from (pasteurized) milk is even absorbed well enough by the body to COUNT for the RDA.<br><br>
Historically, people ate a lot more high-calcium food than they do today (wild greens are VERY high in calcium, and I think bone marrow is too) so I think the RDA is probably pretty good.<br><br>
The USDA has a handy-dandy chart showing the amounts of calcium in a whole bunch of foods (not bone broth though). <a href="http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/Data/SR18/nutrlist/sr18w301.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcom...t/sr18w301.pdf</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,053 Posts
Don't ask me b/c I think the RDA is off on everything. They just set the amounts based on clinical symptoms, not what will confer superior health.<br><br>
I would only trust bone broths if I couldn't do raw dairy. The minerals in greens are not easily absorbed and individual gut function plays a large role. And eating with fat soluble vits too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Okay, since getting my kids to eat something green takes a feat of extraordinary proportions, I'm going to have to start creatively using our bone broths. They don't typically eat a lot of broth as soup, but I'm thinking of cooking it down and using it for their meats, rice, etc. Hmmm, I did make them green popsicles last summer that they (mostly) enjoyed, so those may help a bit. Thanks for the input.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top