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<p>Our boys are 5 and 3.  To this point my in-laws have been the only babysitters we have used since they live 5 minutes away.  But, they can't always babysit for us when we need.  For example DH needs to start working every 5th weekend at work.  I already work every weekend.  My in-laws are away the weekend DH is supposed to start.  But, to this point I haven't trusted a teenager with my children.  3 year old DS isn't a problem.  It's our 5 year old DS who is.  He finished chemo for a brain tumour 10 months ago.  I finally feel ok about that aspect of his health.  But he also has asthma.  It was under control for months now, but he has a cold right now and last night had an hour long asthma attack.  We were on the verge of heading to the ER for it when we finally got it under control.  He isn't old enough or responsible enough to take care of his own asthma which means it is all in the hands of a teenager.  I remember being a teenage babysitter and will admit that I wasn't a good one.  DS also has severe peanut and sesame seed allergies, but we don't have these products in the house so as long as they don't go anywhere it should be safe.</p>
<p>So, do I trust a teenager with him?  I don't even know where to begin to find one.  We don't know anyone in our neighbourhood and haven't seen any teenagers really around.  I could post notes on the mailboxes in the neighbourhood I guess???</p>
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<p>Are there any other options to finding someone we can trust??</p>
 

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<p>Probably the only way I would have this kind of a situation work would be to find an older teen who could come and sit for your DS, while you were home, several times, preferably while he has asthma symptoms, so that you could do some training around neb use, what asthma looks/sounds like, etc.  Actually, I would do this with any sitter you have, no matter what age.  I would also look for someone who has taken a good first aid course.  I would personally emphasize that 911 is to be called without hesitation if there are any concerns at all about breathing.  I would make sure that there was a really good support/back up system in place for the sitter (like a parent, for example).</p>
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<p>I don't have a comfort level of leaving my asthmatic ds w/anyone when he has any symptoms at all, but that's because he can turn really fast from OK to not OK.  If things were well controlled I might feel differently.</p>
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<p>In terms of finding someone, do you have a community college or school of ed or nursing around you?  Just thinking that you might find older or more experienced sitters there.  You could try the local HS or guidance office for a recc.  Or perhaps a church youth group?</p>
 

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<p>I will say please do not ask a nursing student.  They have not learned what they do not know, and could e more dangerous than a random person.  In most cases I would say no, however, I would trust an older teen who was an asthmatic themselves or who cares for a younger sibling with asthma.  However, it would depend on how long it would take DH or I to get home if there was a problem.  I also agree with PP about having them sit with you there ( or very close).</p>
 

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<p>I'd ask other parents for referrals to babysitters and you want to have a babysitter who (a) has taken a babysitting course and is certified in CPR and (b) who's parents or other family members live close by - if there is an emergency and you or your husband can't get home quick enough - there will be other adults for her/him to rely upon.</p>
 

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<p>Hmmm...my son is asthmatic and has anaphylaxis. I did find someone I trusted (a friend's daughter) but I sat down with her and went over how to use the epi pen (w/a practice one) and when along with the asthma stuff. She could do a practice puff of the inhaler with him as well. What I drilled into her was these symptoms mean do this and call 911..no hesitation, no calling us to check first, etc. I was clear that I would rather her over react than wait. In our case I was concerned about anaphylaxis more than asthma as most of the time until recently he's been pretty well controlled.</p>
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<p>Is he using a nebulizer or inhaler with spacer? You really can't mess up an nebulizer (I'd set it up and have a clock that will go off to remind her to use it). An inhaler with a spacer, if your son understands it, is easy too. If he can't do a spacer well and has that much trouble w/asthma I'd want the nebulizer I think.</p>
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<p>If he's so poorly managed though that the inhaler isn't helping and you guys are thinking ER I'd be hesitant to have a sitter but then I'd be hesitant being with him myself. That's scary. Are they changing meds or doing something to try to get it under control?</p>
 
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