Mothering Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,490 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm completely new to the idea of co-ops. I'm wondering if it's standard for parent-led co-ops to be organized into grade level classes? There are so many co-ops in my area and I'm wondering if I can expect this type of organization. I have a child who does not fit into a grade level across the board, so, on the surface, it seems problematic. What do you do if you think your child belongs in a higher grade level class? Would that, typically, be a difficult thing to negotiate? Again, I'm really new to co-ops. I'm just researching options in my area. I was surprised at how "school-like" the co-ops seem to be, at least on the surface.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,560 Posts
We participate in a one morning a week coop that we really love. Class topics are brainstormed 2x a year and taught by folks based on interest. The breakdown is this:

2-3 year olds (craft, story, play)
4-5 year olds (craft, story, play)
5-7 year olds (topics)
8-10 year olds (topics)
11 and up (topics)

If a kid wants to attend a class in an age grouping greater than their own, they (or the parent) talk to the teacher. Often, when bumping up an age the parent attends along with the kid. There are two 1-hour sessions and playground time. It runs 8 weeks with a 9th session of potlucking, playing and sharing performances.

We skipped the coop until dd1 was turning 5. Dp is teaching a class to the 5-7's this next time on "Ancient Science" with ideas from this book: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/047...901423?ie=UTF8

Some coops in our area (the ones I'm familiar with are restricted to conservative Christians) are structured like part-time schools. I think those have grade levels assigned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
Our co-op uses age or grade level as a general description of the classes. Most people, homeschooling or not, have a pretty good understanding of "grade level" as far as the content of any given class is, I think. For instance, I intend to teach a grammar class from the (released tomorrow) new 'Eats, Shoots and Leaves' book, which has been modified for ages "4-8" according to the publisher's description. I will likely say the class I am offering is for 2nd-3rd graders, but it is open to anyone, including parents who are not teaching that period, who would like to have fun learning about comma use. Likewise, my toddler movement "class" will be geared toward 2-3 year olds, but some 4 year olds may like to sing and clap and stomp and some 3 year olds may be more interested in a hands-on art class. My boys are under two and will be part of that activity period. My literature class last year was "K-2", according to the class description, mainly so that parents would have a rough idea of what "Literature" meant, since the meaning, in the context of class content, can vary wildly from K-12. If my 5 year old was doing 4th grade math and that was a class being offered, I'm sure the class would be available to her, it's just a benchmark for understanding of prerequisite material.

I guess what I'm trying to say is: we use grade levels, but they're not meant to be exclusive, only to provide a guide for parents who think their children may be interested in the topic.

Does that help at all? I feel a little ramble-y today. I think it's the fumes from painting windows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,825 Posts
The co-op we're participating in this upcoming year divides classes into 'general grade levels.' There are classes for preschoolers, K-2, 3-5, and 'middle school.' Class descriptions tell what is taught in the class. Parents are free to place their child in whatever class they feel would be appropriate for their child. There are multiple classes available for each age group, and you can sign up for 1 class or 5, depending on what your child is interested in (and how much extra $ you have sitting around
) You could sign a child up for one level science class, and a different level literature class if that's where you felt your child's needs would be best served.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
The coop we did had a preschool class with nursery for some babies and toddlers. K-2, 3-5,6-8 and highschool. We did ours at a sports complex center 2hour session once a week. 1/2 of the classes would be in the gym area while 1/2 were in classrooms after an hour they switched. It worked really great. My kids LOVED it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,896 Posts
most of the ones here are organized by age.

I have organized several. one organized by age (5 and under, 6 to 11, 12 and up), one specifically for 6-10 with the condition that they must be reading and writing, and one that was split by non-readers, reading elementry and middle school and up. and there was a gym time which is split between big kids and little kids


we were very firm on the age thing. everyone thinks thier kid is special and intellegent. esp[ecially if they seem more intrested in the cooler more technical stuff the older kids are doing. but the older kids don't nessecarily ant the younger kids around even if they are capable, we know which ages are most likely to participate and have arranged materials and instructors accordingly, and if one 8 year old gets to move up everyone else will think they have the option too (and well they should. if you get to choose why shouldn't they). So we had a firm policy on age boundries. and if you didn't think your kid would enjoy the activities for thier age range then this activity just wasn't a good fit for them. in our group though parents were always free to plan and ecute whatever activities they wanted with whatever rules and restirctions or whatever freedoms they wanted. so if they wanted a more open free-er co-op they were more then welcome to set it up, organize it and pull it off. but who ever had done the work got to make whatever rules they wanted and be as firm as they wanted.

although we did learn it was best not to do grade levels because that was far to easy to fudge. especially in the homeschool crowd. so we always always did age.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,899 Posts
We're part of a coop that is loosely organized by school categories (lower elementary, upper elementary, middle, high school). This is just to give an idea of what kind of maturity is needed for the class. Anyone can take the class, no matter how old they are, if they think the material will be appropriate for their skill level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,490 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you everyone. It's good to know that there's a wide variety of set-ups out there, some stricter and some looser. I will have to keep looking at my local options. Thank you.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top