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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do your kids do any studying in summer, preparing for the next grade which is not part of any assignment(s) the school has given for the next grade?

Just wondering.
 

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When my kids were younger (they are 17 and 18 now) they spent breaks doing things like:


Reading
Playing board games
Cooking
learning new life skills (cleaning, laundry, pet care, yard care, mending, and so on)
Going interesting place


All of these things support and increase academic learning. You don't need to get a workbook on specific skills for your child's grade. Did you know that in middle class and upper middle class schools, the average child returns to school reading at a higher level than they left school? (not so for kids from low SES). Live life, and help your child find things they are passionate about. Make regular trips to the library. Visit the museums, historic sites, and natural areas near where you live, and have fun.


(If your child is truly behind or has a special need, some focused work might be a good idea, but even then, keep it minimal and instead read together and play games with math. Kids need a break, and they really can learn a lot from an enriched life.)
 

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*we homeschool*, but summers are spent doing field trips, vacations, library time etc. All of which give/gave ds opportunites to read and comprehend. You would be amazed at what reading the informational plates at the zoo, museum etc do for a kids vocabulary and comprehension. DS loved stopping to read every-single-thing when he was younger. As he gets older there is summer session for classes but i try to get him to take a 'fun' class as well. Not just the requirements or core subjects all the time. We also did summer camps which fall under edu-tainment imo. (Science center, rock garden, extra swim camp etc).
 

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Do your kids do any studying in summer, preparing for the next grade which is not part of any assignment(s) the school has given for the next grade?

Just wondering.
We play. We read. We go to the library. The kids go to camp in the morning for half the summer (chess, drawing, fencing, robot building) and that is enough. We may have one or two goals for the summer (my rising third grader needs to memorize his times tables this summer, learn to tie his shoes) but nothing else. If one of my kids was struggling with something we might focus on that. The summer is a time to be free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks. Dd is doing only fun stuff - everything she enjoys including swimming, amusement parks, art class, beach, reading stuff she likes... However, there are kids that are going to Math and possibly other classes for the next grade and I was like a little bit of work once a week (maybe) couldn't hurt but she absolutely is not interested in any "work" related stuff.
 

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However, there are kids that are going to Math and possibly other classes for the next grade and I was like a little bit of work once a week (maybe) couldn't hurt but she absolutely is not interested in any "work" related stuff.


Not only could you end up with power struggles about going since she doesn't want to, it could make next school year worse. It's pre-teaching the curriculum, so it could make school less interesting and more repetitive.


I really think that the more choice we give our kids about their own lives the better. There are some things they can't make choices about, but when they can, I'm 100% for it. I'm also not a fan of pre-teaching material unless a child is either behind or has learning difficulty.


When my kids have done formal semi-academic classes during the summer, they were all enrichment based rather than school curriculum based. They did a thing on the legal system where they had mock trails for fairy tail characters and other stuff like that. I really wouldn't sign up my child up for the kind of program you are describing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not only could you end up with power struggles about going since she doesn't want to, it could make next school year worse. It's pre-teaching the curriculum, so it could make school less interesting and more repetitive.


I really think that the more choice we give our kids about their own lives the better. There are some things they can't make choices about, but when they can, I'm 100% for it. I'm also not a fan of pre-teaching material unless a child is either behind or has learning difficulty.


When my kids have done formal semi-academic classes during the summer, they were all enrichment based rather than school curriculum based. They did a thing on the legal system where they had mock trails for fairy tail characters and other stuff like that. I really wouldn't sign up my child up for the kind of program you are describing.

Thanks, Linda, always appreciate your advice. :smile:
 

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I used to encourage it. Since my daughter was going through speech therapy and what not, she had some work to do throughout summer, but not a whole lot. With her stress levels and anxiety now, I'm allowing her a nice long break to unwind. It's her 2nd weekend camping with her grandparents and I can see she is finally getting back to her normal, goofy, happy self. When she is 16 I expect her to start learning how to job search and hopefully she will get a p/t job for the summer and be involved in some sort of organized activity. She reads plenty enough. I try to look for opportunities to naturally teach her math, like in fractions in cooking, and counting money. I've noticed there is little need to learn multiplications as everything multiplied can be added and everything divided can be subtracted. It's just a longer way of calculating. Plus, there are calculators, too.
I teach her about history and geography. She is teaching herself Japanese so she can understand manga comics. And tries to use some French words.
She writes songs and stories. She's been creating art with art programs on the computer. She is really improving.
The only thing I think I would like her to work on is being more active. But then again, she isn't really a sports person. That's okay. She's doing lots of fun things outdoors and goes swimming every week or so. Hangs with friends. I'd say that this is what summer is all about. There's enough sitting and listening to lessons throughout the school year, and the teachers usually give a refresher at the beginning of the year anyways.
 

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Yes, definitely! I try to use a variety of workbooks/worksheets during the summer time to help my students be more prepared for the upcoming school year. IXL, Beestar, Kumon, Singapore Math that are available at the after-school program. Beestar is really helpful since it is free and my students can log in to the website from home. They also have a new section for gifted and talented students that is super helpful for some of my new students. During summer it also keeps them interested in the subjects since they can see their name show up on the honor roll system and keeps them engaged in learning.
 

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My son attends full-day museum day camp where each week is focused on an art or natural history topic. It is school-like enough that I don't expect him to do any other schoolwork. I read aloud to him for about 30 minutes at bedtime, but he can decide on his own how much he wants to read to himself. Once in a while he chooses to play math-related computer games.
 

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Yes, absolutely!
Studies show that kids who don't participate in some academic activities during Summer are a full month behind. Say you're learning a new language. You can't just take 3 months off and think you can pick up right where you left. When you get back into it you will be behind where you stopped 3 months prior. You'll catch up fairly quickly but you will still lag behind someone else who didn't take a full 3 months off.

Right now, we put our son in academic Summer day camp 3 weeks during the Summer, one week for each month off. The camp is held at his school so it also serves the purpose of helping to maintain relationships with teachers and friends. As he gets older we will find more specialized camps that focus on subjects he's most interested in (like science or writing).
 
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