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If you do or don't... why?? What message do scrubs convey?? if any. I am going to say:<br><br>
It alarms me that homebirth Midwives and students would wear scrubs to births. Aren't we trying to avaoid "medicalization" of birth. Scrubs in my humble opinion convey to a woman that the wearer of the scrubs has some authority over her..... I do not like it. I wore scrubs for 10 years at the hospital. I do not plan to wear them at homebirths....<br><br>
doning my fire retardant suit..... What do YOU think???<br><br>
Sincerly wondering,<br>
Michelle
 

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I do because they are much more comfortable than anything else I have. Plus I wear Pink scrubs for girls and blue for boys. I also notice I get more respect from OB's and nurses if I'm in scrubs and families get a kick out of the color cordiantion and bottom line they are so easy to sew together. I've often had extra sets used by partners after getting wet or other body fluids get their normal clothes gross.
 

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I don't wear scrubs because I think it sets up a power structure in the home, but that's just me. I don't feel like I'm part of the "scrub club" - nor do I want to be part of it. I'm an invited peer and guest into a family's home, not a surgeon. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">
 

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My midwife wears scrubs during births. I'm glad that I knew this before the birth. I think it might have bothered me if I hadn't been mentally prepared for it. For me its not so much a power thing as a general ambiance of medicalization. My midwife showed up in her regular clothes and changed at my house. I didn't mind it too much during the birth. I figure its more comfortable in some of the weird posistions she ends up in and they are something that she isn't going to worry about getting messy like her regular clothes. I had a roommate in college who wore scrubs all of the time as her regular clothes so it doesn't take me too long to get used to it.
 

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I always wore scrub pants and a t-shirt (either birth advocacy or plain) to births....it was more comfy and less likely to stain. Since I wore a t-shirt on top, it didn't look quite as medical. I felt that my behavior at a birth was more telling of my feelings of power structure than my clothes...but maybe I'm wrong. Always learning and improving <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I prefer to wear the bottoms and a t-shirt, just because the bottoms are soo comfy. I usually have on flip flops which I can kick off as soon as possible, too, so my bare feet, purple polish, toe rings and ankle bracelets probably deter a bit from the medical look. I love the roomy pockets of the scrub tops, but don't wear them unless I'm in a clinic.<br>
I wore a skirt to a birth twice and once it went over my head (waterbirth) exposing my big flowery butt for all the world to see (well, everyone who watches the birth video).<br>
I'm rather intuitive about my clients as well, so if I feel as if my scrub bottoms won't be appreciated I'll wear something else (NOT a skirt, though!). I know some women really have issues with medical stuff.<br><br>
I have worn the bottoms, tops and white shoes (even socks!) to a birth because the mama's family had reservations (okay, they were totally freaked out) and felt comforted by a more "medical" looking attendant.<br><br>
I don't judge people by their appearances, so how some one dresses has no influence on how I view them as a person or attendant. Scrubs or not, some people are just damn bossy and their actions and attitude are going to make them appear as if they would like to be in a position of power.<br><br>
Ya'll would have gotten a kick out of my midwife who came to my births in her gov't issue white uniform, right down to the white stockings and shoes, with her little cap on her head.
 

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Scrub bottoms for me-black only though, and a solid colored tee or sometimes my 'doula' top <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> I definatley find that if you wear black scrub bottoms, most people wont even really notice that's what they are. I just really find them comfortable, washable, and practical but do not want to look medical AT ALL, either by my clients or by the medical staff. If it's a homebirth I wear a slightly different outfit, black drawstring pants that are technically workout pants I think but look like dress pants if I need them to. Then if there is a transfer for any reason, I have a plain button-up collared shirt that I put on (over my top which is always a black or white shell). I think that gives me a professional look and just helps the hospital staff see me as more than one of those 'hippee homebirth doula people' (which of course, I am).
 

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several mws I have worked with wear scrubs- I don't and they don't ask me to-- but I also carry a bag for myself that includes at least one change of clothes.<br>
If I were to wear scrubs I would probably wear the kind you couldn't even tell were scrubs- this one younger mw I work with off and on has 100% woven cotton scrubs that look like ethnic pants and she wears tee shirts with them-- most of the gals I work with who wear scrubs usually change into them at the couple's home and I think it mostly has to do with keeping their clothes from getting stained or ruined, but maybe it does serve some "ritual" purpose as well -- some contrast from the everyday to birth mode... I don't know- I just try to avoid getting messy- and want to be comfortable/be myself-- which includes how I dress and how I ritually prepare for birth is to still myself- I step into what is happening right now and don't spend time -dwelling or thinking about my own life- I try to make all my home arrangements before I arrive at a couple's home if possible or soon there after, and unless I have someone else due I even shut my phone off too.
 

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My mw wears comfy pants and shirts, think sweats or some type of excerce pants and t-shirts or some type of a nice fitted shirt. She wears a short apron with a lot of pockets.<br><br>
Her helpers have worn dresses as that is their dress code.<br><br>
Scrubs would bother me. I am having a HOME not medical birth.<br><br>
I really like seeing my mw in comfy clothes, it help relaxe me.
 

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Our CNM does...DH and I both felt that it added to her professionalism (read: can handle any situation under pressure better than if I was at the hospital)<br><br>
Combine that with her incredibly low transfer rate+total trust in woman's body+absence of any unnecessary monitoring+leaning on the side of the less intervention the better...and you have a super situation in my opinion!!!:0 We loved her!
 

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I hope it's ok I'm posting here since I'm neither a midwife or a doula...just an expectant mom experiencing the world of midwifery care for the first time.<br><br>
For the record, I love that I see my midwife wearing scrubs at our appointments. It's so much easier to talk to someone who looks more casual rather than one of those intimidating white coats. To me, the white coat is what someone would wear if they were trying to convey "who's in charge". Scrubs, at least to me, convey "I'm about to get my hands dirty with this birth, I'm not going to stand by and let the nurses do it all. We are in this together". They seem very casual to me and I love that it helps put me at ease. Her assistant wears regular clothes at our appointments.
 

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I'm not surprised that CNMs wear them because of the model that they're trained under.<br><br>
I am, however, surprised that homebirth non-nurse midwives wear them.<br><br>
To me, it's a reflection of how medically minded midwifery has become - and I think a great deal of it has to do (sadly) with formal schools.
 

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as a doula I don't wear them to homebirths but do to hospital births...<br>
I think in a hospital setting the parents aren't as concerned about the medical image (hence being in the hospital) but the scrubs seem to afford <i>some</i> respect from the staff, I stand out just a little, it's obvious I'm not just the sister kwim... but in a home birth I don't specifically for the reasons stated. I have a pair of hemp drawstring yoga pants I made that I love, they are super comfy and everything comes out of them paired with an advocacy or plain t-shirt and I always have a back up set of clothes or scrubs regardless of birthing enviroment.
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm not surprised that CNMs wear them because of the model that they're trained under.<br><br>
I am, however, surprised that homebirth non-nurse midwives wear them.<br><br>
To me, it's a reflection of how medically minded midwifery has become - and I think a great deal of it has to do (sadly) with formal schools.</div>
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As in, "you are what you wear"? I can't make that connection, maybe because based on my experiences it doesn't hold true. I know MW's who wear Birkies, bandanas and peasant skirts who will break water at 4 cms, direct pushing, and yank the placenta out, and mws who wear full scrub get-up right down to the nursing shoes who sit on their hands. I can't jump to the conclusion that a mw who wears scrubs is going to medically manage my birth as much as I can't jump to the conclusion that a mw who wears a daishiki is going to ask me to join hands and sing Kumbaya if I hemorrhage. I worked with and apprenticed with a broad range of midwives, (and I feel very blessed to have had not one but 5 preceptors and have been able to work with over a dozen midwives) both empirically trained and formally trained, even the odd CNM here and there, and it didn't seem to make much difference as far as how they chose to practice. Some of the empirically trained midwives were the quickest to jump in and manage a birth from the get go, and some of the formally trained midwives were so laid back they almost weren't there, and vice versa.<br>
I really think it has less to do with one's mode of training and appearance as it does with the mw's personal philosphies and how she applies her experiences to her practice. I wouldn't judge a midwife based on her attire anymore than I would judge a client based on hers.
 

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no, not in you are what you wear necessarily, but it sure seems like some mws really want to be "accepted" and so they like wearing scrubs to homebirths. I guess I feel like I'm not part of the medical model, wasn't trained in it, etc., and so I am not part of their "club". The last thing I'd want is to transport and end up having "them" see me in "their" uniform. Does that make sense?<br><br>
I have NEVER had an issue with getting blood/mec out of my clothes, but then again, I rarely ever get ANYTHING on me. I don't understand how scrubs are somehow more "comfortable" or "easier to clean" than regular street clothes.<br><br>
I wear nice jeans, pants, nice shirts, etc. I always wear professional clothes because if there's ever a transport, I want them to know that I am a professional and not somebody in shorts and a tank top.<br><br>
It's not about the fact that I'm a certain type of mw, so I wear birks (which I do not - I'm as far from hippie as you can get). It's about wanting to be "seen" as something that I'm not - part of the medical community.<br><br>
For me, I have to admit that I seriously wonder WHY a non-nurse midwife would WANT to wear scrubs other than to be seen as "part of the club". They aren't any more comfortable than street clothes - and for larger women, they suck. They are definitely not any easier to clean.<br><br>
So, yes, for me, it does bring up some red flags. Not necessarily in how she would manage my birth, but how she views herself in my community.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>pamamidwife</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">no, not in you are what you wear necessarily, but it sure seems like some mws really want to be "accepted" and so they like wearing scrubs to homebirths. I guess I feel like I'm not part of the medical model, wasn't trained in it, etc., and so I am not part of their "club". The last thing I'd want is to transport and end up having "them" see me in "their" uniform. Does that make sense?<br>
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I wrote and erased almost this exact statement, and interestingly when we have transfered the other mws usually change into street clothes- an ambulance transport would be a different thing though because there is no time then.<br>
one thing about scrubs is that it usually puts you not only on their team somehow but also as a "nurse" if you watch care providers usually will come in with street clothes on, and then slip into a particular color scrub- like that yucky green or powder blue- none of the ob docs I have seen wear speciality scrubs--<br>
when I first met mws who wore scrubs- it was offensive to me but over time it doesn't seem like a big deal-- I don't like the dress like a "professional" push to be accepted, it is your knowledge and behavior that makes you a professional-- at one point when thinking about dressing up for births I thought ok then why not have a closet full of costumes and offer "theme births"-- you know mermaid costumes to go with water births or little house on the prairie, tie die, a jingle dress and shawl, pirate costume... it would be more fun than a starched uniform ; )
 

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Yes I do for all the positive reasons already mentioned.<br><br>
At one of my births my midwife told me that she was sorry to be be late she was at the barn putting the horses in. I was having a quick birth so she came like she was with out changing. I had blaring echos of tetnes in the back of my mind I never said anything to her but I began to wonder where she had been just prvious to my other births.<br><br>
Right then I decided that if ever I completed my studies(midwifery) I would wear scrubs.<br><br>
While in training under midwives they all requires me as an apprentice to wear scrubs. More than once I was anointed in amniatic fluid and was very glad to have an extra set in my kit.<br><br>
I could say more but I think others have already said it.<br><br>
BTW I try to be very hands off midwife. I really trust birth and womens bodies. I haven't felt that my scrubs have ever been an indication of my education or practice of midwifery.<br><br>
I do tell my clients that it is my preference and so far no one has ever abjected. and I don't object if my assistance or apprentices want to wear somthing else. I only require that it be something that they use only for birth or at least only worn that day for birth.<br><br>
Valerie<br><br>
Valerie
 

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Good point- I wear clean clothes and pack clean clothes to wear- if I have time I shower before I leave I do. so even though I wear my everyday clothing to a birth- it is not the stuff I have had on all day -
 

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Interesting point I think has been missed:<br><br>
What does the CLIENT want?<br><br>
I ask every client - scrubs okay? or regular clothes.<br><br>
Most have a distinct preference and I am sure to honor it.<br><br>
When there are children in the house, at the 37 week home visit, I also bring three shirts and let them pick out the shirt I will wear (will it be Nemo? Star Wars? a big birthing flower?). I do this for several reasons.<br><br>
1. To show the children they are a part of this process, too.<br>
2. To honor their decision-making abilities.<br>
3. To demonstrate to the parents that I care about their other children and will incorporate them into the birth as much or as little as the parents desire.<br>
4. To let the child/ren know what I will be wearing when I come into their home in the middle of the night - so they recognize me, whatever I am wearing.<br><br>
I also open my trunk and show them the bags I will be bringing in so they understand nothing is wrong when I step out and back in with a couple of different bags, open them, pull things out, etc.<br><br>
I always ask the parents if there are limitations to the choices I can offer the children (no Disney, no breasts, etc.) and honor those as well.<br><br>
When I transport, no matter what I am wearing, I change into new scrubs - and nice, pretty, *different* ones than any hospital staff would wear. We have, over the years, seen the attitude that comes with midwives wearing, or not wearing, scrubs during a transfer/transport and almost across the board, the treatment not only to the midwife, but to the client, is better, kinder, and more respectful. Of course it isn't any kind of panacea, but in some communities, ya gotta grab what you can get.<br><br>
Midwives in scrubs are "seen" and able to be picked out quickly in a room of questioning strangers. They are not only for authority's sake, but also so people know who is who! (I believe what we convey onto the clothing is what makes it authoritarian, not the clothing itself, but that's another philosophical point.)<br><br>
I don't want to be mistaken for the aunt; I want them to know I am the midwife. And one who can "play their game" of dress-up and speak their lingo and still be a staunch and sturdy advocate for my client and her baby and the family. I have seen midwives who didn't know how to play the hospital game and they are nearly impotent in getting anything positive going for their client and, many times, are just as snowed or railroaded as the client ends up being. I'm more than glad I came up in the hospital ranks, then moved through birth centers... I know it all pays off in spades as a homebirth midwife.<br><br>
Barb Herrera
 

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I can't say enough great things about Cotton Scrubs<br><br><a href="http://www.cottonscrubs.com/" target="_blank">http://www.cottonscrubs.com/</a><br><br>
They are so wonderful and last *forever*. (I have several pair that are 5 years old or more, including white tops, and they wash great!) I also wore them when I was 350 pounds.<br><br>
I also got large-sized scrubs (pants, because my behind is a LOT bigger than my top and Cotton Scrubs didn't have a size for me) from here:<br><br><a href="http://www.largesizescrubs.com/" target="_blank">http://www.largesizescrubs.com/</a><br><br>
They custom-make them according to your desire/need for pockets, length, etc. They also have a delightful variety of prints and colors - unusual for very large scrubs.<br><br>
Cotton Scrubs, however, are my all-time favorite because they are so soft and so breath-able.<br><br>
Barb Herrera
 
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