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Barb -- I'm moving to Cali and hiring you right away. I'm due any minute, think I can make it? lol You rock!<br><br>
I wear scrub bottoms at the hospital. I work for a hospital (basically I volunteer). We're not required to wear scrubs, though its recommended. (bottoms only) We have a doula shirt that we can wear or a we can wear plain colored shirts or low-key shirts. We don't have to wear the scrub bottoms, we just have to wear dark colored bottoms, and that's okay with me. Its to differenciate us from the rest of the staff. Heck, the nurses and doctors and everyone else wear different colored scrubs and coats to differentiate amongst themselves, why not us? I actually like my scrub pants. It's really hard for me to find anything that fits and is comfortable and I looked long and hard for these. They fit well and are comfortable. I'm very short (4'11") and these actually fit my height the way they are supposed to. The're really comfortable as well. And they have a nice pocket on the leg that is perfect for a small notebook and my cell phone <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I've worn sweat pants before and different shirts. I don't tend to look sloppy or anything like that. For homebirths, I wear whatever. Always barefoot <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I have worn scrub pants and skirts, tank-type shirts, t-shirts. My birkenstocks go everywhere, I even try to take 'em to hospital births but then I remember that the floor is slick sometimes and my tennis shoes work better, so they sit in my bag <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
It never occurred to me to ask my MW about what she wears to births. I know she told me actually, though now I forget. She comes to my appointments in all kinds of different things, everything from shorts to really nice clothes. I know she said she waears comfortable clothes to births and went into more detail but frankly, I forget. It wouldn't bother me if she were wearing scrubs, or if my doula showed up in them either, because I'd be a little too busy to care <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
Namaste, Tara
 

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OK, so I'm pondering this topic more.<br><br>
What would the difference be between comfort in the form of cotton yoga clothes (I have been into many yoga positions assisting at births lol!), t-shirts, the like and scrubs? Both are equally washable, and you could carry a spare, low care clothing...<br><br>
The ONLY thing I can come up with for scrubs is the look-staff clothing, uniform!<br><br>
I gotta tell you I have gotten all kinds of things on me and have spent much time with Mama on the floor, bathroom, holding her and babe. And I always leave my shoes at the door. It's a sign of respect.
 

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Zoo Loo Naturals asks:<br><br>
What would the difference be between comfort in the form of cotton yoga clothes (I have been into many yoga positions assisting at births lol!), t-shirts, the like and scrubs? Both are equally washable, and you could carry a spare, low care clothing...<br><br>
I answer:<br><br>
For me, for a long, long time, loose and cotton clothes didn't come in my size. Easily, for 15+ years, I wore sundresses (from Frankfurt to Orlando to San Diego - no matter the weather) that I could find that fit my body. When they finally came about in my size, I wore bike shorts under the dresses so I didn't get nearly as chafed as I had for years previously. (I also learned that Monistat would quell the "rashes" I got under my belly and boobs; that helped, too.)<br><br>
As I got smaller, I began wearing leggings with a big giant shirt (I had plenty to draw from) and have only begun wearing scrubs recently and even then, it isn't every time. While I haven't gotten to a birth without undies and my hair askew <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"> I *have* gone without make-up and my hair done and that is about the same for me as no undies and spaghetti stains on my shirt. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="blush"> (Now I am bald from medication so it significantly shortens my getting-out-of-the-house time!) The scrub pants I wear tend to be stretchy and almost always have to have ankle cuffs because I am also far too short for most pairs of pants; Capri pants meet my ankles like regular pants. I'm in a place of not-so-much-comfort-in-my-body, so know that is part of why I don't wear leggings/yoga pants (which are always far too long).<br><br>
Still many thoughts as the topic unfolds: how nurse/medical family members feel comforted by seeing scrubs (yes, differentiating heirarchally *to the family* - I agree - but part of that is being seen as the woman's care provider; helpful in many situations); clients glad I am able to stand toe-to-toe with the hospital staff in a transport/transfer (I know that, for me, wearing similar, but different, clothes helps *me* feel seen and heard when my client needs me to be seen and heard); understanding of the distaste for scrubs and my knowing my own motivations and continuing to adhere to not only my standards, but my community's standards.<br><br>
Which, btw, is different to many. What is modest or not-offensive to one person can be highly eyebrow-raising and immodest to others. (I distinctly remember a client's husband being embarrassed by a midwife-supportive shirt because a belly and breasts were on the front.) Scrubs are always modest and if they have patterns, don't show leaking breast milk, spilling period blood, meconium, or spilling hot chocolate - all positives in my book. They are also thicker than most casual clothes I could wear or have worn.<br><br>
Ultimately, for me, because I wear both scrubs or regular clothes (that right now are mostly skirts and tops), the choice is for the mama to make and I carry complete changes of clothes of both, down to undies and socks, too in case she changes her mind or I get splashed or gookie.<br><br>
I wanted to mention Birkenstocks' plastic clogs (Super Birki Clogs) are the best! I have them in Purple and Black and they can be tossed into the washer (some throw them in the dishwasher) with the insert removed after a birth... can be kicked off when arriving to a home and slipped on quickly when leaving. I slip them off and put my car keys in the sole (heel) so I always know where my keys are. (If toddlers are around, the keys go UP!)<br><br>
Anyway, I do understand the points against scrubs. And appreciate the points for them.<br><br>
Barb Herrera
 

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Well, not really. I don't disagree with you, I agree with your points. You just don't empathize with my issues. Your POV is coming across, to me, as fairly judgemental and inflexible.<br><br>
WRT what is or isn't "flattering" I really don't care. I don't go to a birth to try to look attractive, that's the farthest thing from my mind.<br><br>
I'm defintitely not ignoring how clients might feel, I already stated that I would have no problem at all skipping scrubs if it made someone uncomfortable. After this thread I will certainly give it more consideration. I would like to hear more from clients than midwives and doulas, hear what they would like to see their attendants wearing.<br><br>
Frankly, I think it's kind of overblown to put so much emphasis on what the midwife wears. Obviously if someone was scarred by a medicalized birth (I was) that is something to consider. I have no idea what my midwife wore to my birth, I don't remember, and at the time she could have been naked and I would not have cared. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
In my area there is a great deal of flack given (by the midwifery community) towards midwives who look unprofessional. Perhaps it is ingrained in me since I "grew-up" in this community... I don't know.
 

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I am a doula, and don't wear scrubs. I wear comfortable cloths- and bring an extra set, just in case, but I don't wear scrubs... here's why:<br>
1. I never even concidered it<br>
2. When I was transfered to the hospital, my midwife (who was a CNM and had privledges at the hosp) left for a few minutes and returned in scubs. It REALLY freaked me out. It sucked enough I had to be transfered into the hospital, but the fact that my midwife all of a sudden looked liked a doctore really bothered me. Pshcological? Yes- but a lot of what we expereince in birth is. Think of how we are always suggesting to women to bring pictures/something to focus on, or why the birthing environment it's self is so important. Images and our surroundings convay certain messages and really affect us. I don't want/need to convay any messages that my suggest anything "medical"- I think that's already been taken care of.<br><br>
If I am with a client who would like me to look professional, I have done a good job so far at doing so with out comprimising my comfort.<br><br>
I like to potray the image of nurtureer and caretaker, so I try to dress in casual, comfortable clothing that allows me to take an active role in the image I portray.
 

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This is a great thread! I really appreciate all of you who have put in your viewpoints.<br><br>
As the topic turned toward what is good for the couple and how they would view their birth attendants wearing scrubs, I had to reflect back upon my own births with midwives, the same midwives that I later apprenticeshipped under. My midwives were more than just my birth attendants, they were my friends in homeschooling, food cooping, LLL, and SO much more, that to see them in scrubs might have caused me to see them differently. I would have to say that from my viewpoint of a laboring/birthing mom, that I did appreciate them in regular, familiar clothing.<br><br>
Now, onto the time of my apprenticeship. There was a dress code stating, that we were to be in a modest dress during prenatals, births, and postpartum checks. I respected this code, because it made sense. Their reasoning was that we were there to serve and not be a distraction, either in irregular garb or in how it portrayed us. The whole idea was to be as much a part of the background as possible.<br><br>
I really appreciate this opportunity to think about what I need to do in the future. At this time, I have a set of scrubs to wear to births. The woman I am working with wears scrubs, merely to make sure that there is a set apart, clean outfit to wear and I am 100% behind her in doing this. I just need to see if it is scrubs that I need to be wearing.
 

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This is a really great topic <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> As a client, I have to say if my doula popped over in a pair of scrubs, I think I would fire her on the spot. Since a doula is supposed to be a labor support person and not in a medical role, it would really bother me to see her in scrubs. Now if it was a volunteer doula in a hospital setting, I can see the scrub pants and then a different top, but still it takes away the personal-ness of the whole thing, doesn't that make sense? The uniform would just bother me.<br><br>
As far as homebirth midwives wearing scrubs.... I guess it is cool with me if they leave it open to the client and let the client choose. I choose homebirth for my family because I feel it is a safer choice than the medical model. I don't want to see that medical model stroll into my home. Some clients might feel the most comfortable with their midwives in scrubs, but not me. And yes, it is something I notice and remember... I can still describe in detail what the midwife was wearing to the birth of my son <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I am surprised that in some places it is more acceptable for midwives in transfers to be wearing scrubs. Maybe it has to do with licensure? My last birth was in a state that doesn't license, nor is homebirth protected, so I guess the midwives there didn't want to look like they were trying to practice medicine. In my mind, I would think it would be worse to be dressed as part of the medical establishment. I can only compare it to when I was in the National Guard. They would do these weekends where kids (meaning 17-18year olds) could come and see what a drill weekend was like before they joined. The ones that always rubbed everybody the wrong way were the ones that would show up in their camoflague-looking-like-a-uniform-sorta outfits. It was just too wanna-be. So, I would think in at least some communities that wearing scrubs would kind of relate to my experience as the nursing staff and docs would see the midwives as just wanna-be's.<br><br>
Now, of course, this has all just been my own opinion, for what it is worth <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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It would be looked down upon here is you transported to a hospital in street clothes. Maybe because we are legal and recognized here? I don't know. But if you showed up in street clothes without a SOAP chart you could damage the reputation of other midwives in the area. One of us represents all of us here, it's a lot of pressure.<br><br>
This has been a good topic. I like it when people can disagree and state their opinions without insisting they are fact, KWIM? I learn so much more that way.
 

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soap charting!!!!!!! this is not done here at all- you better show up with a transfer sheet or else forms/copies of forms-- the docs and nurses here don't read at all- they want the info at hand and easy to read-- being able to give report is a key skill, not only to give report to nurses or docs but to be able to give concise info to ambulance crew too- this is a format they are use to and comprehend right away. I am more concerned with the gals who show up no matter how they are dressed and give "flakey" information, or fail to realize how some of their information may be received.<br>
I agree we all can represent but we have the biggest duty to birthing families. So if the best way to serve them is to show up with scrubs on ok but I don't think it is true everywhere.<br>
Pam also has a point about authority and trappings of authority, it is something to consider.
 

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My m/w didn't wear scrubs at the birthing center, ever. When I started pushing she put on a big drape and I think maybe some plastic things over her glasses? (I don't really remember!) I thought it was cool that she delivered me in sweatpants. I guess some of you would find sweats "unprofessional" but we all rolled in at 2:30am so I think it's to be expected. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I'd be weirded out by a homebirth m/w wearing scrubs, though, I do think that scrubs look super comfy. I'm always jealous of pg nurses because I think those things must be awesome maternity pants!
 

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Yup, here you better show up with a transport with the labor notes, prenatal flow sheet, and labs, as well as be able to give report. If you don't show up with labs, they're going to treat mama like she had no labs, including antibiotics in labor OR if it's too late for that, the baby is going to the NICU and get hooked up to IV ABX for 3 days. If you didn't chart it, you didn't do it, as far as they're concerned. And they're much less likely to take your report or charting seriously if you don't look professional or speak the lingo.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mwherbs</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">soap charting!!!!!!! this is not done here at all- you better show up with a transfer sheet or else forms/copies of forms-- the docs and nurses here don't read at all- they want the info at hand and easy to read-- being able to give report is a key skill, not only to give report to nurses or docs but to be able to give concise info to ambulance crew too- this is a format they are use to and comprehend right away. I am more concerned with the gals who show up no matter how they are dressed and give "flakey" information, or fail to realize how some of their information may be received.<br>
I agree we all can represent but we have the biggest duty to birthing families. So if the best way to serve them is to show up with scrubs on ok but I don't think it is true everywhere.<br>
Pam also has a point about authority and trappings of authority, it is something to consider.</div>
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I wasn't trying to say that only midwives here have the issue of representing for all... just merely pointing out what is expected of us. We also have to have a transport sheet but the hospitals don't care about that, that is just for our charts. Our biggest duty IS to the family but I fail to see how that contradicts what I said in my post WRT our obligations towards the midwifery community. It won't do any birthing families any good if we ruin our relationships with the hospitals around here, things are shakey enough.<br><br>
I agree that Pamamidwife has a point about the power and authority, that's her opinion and it definitely has value. But, I disagree that a desire for power is ALWAYS the motivation behind wearing scrubs. That's my opinion, no one here is exactly right or wrong, it's all opinions. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sevenkids</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Yup, here you better show up with a transport with the labor notes, prenatal flow sheet, and labs, as well as be able to give report. If you don't show up with labs, they're going to treat mama like she had no labs, including antibiotics in labor OR if it's too late for that, the baby is going to the NICU and get hooked up to IV ABX for 3 days. If you didn't chart it, you didn't do it, as far as they're concerned. And they're much less likely to take your report or charting seriously if you don't look professional or speak the lingo.</div>
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Ditto, sadly. That's exactly how it is here and, unfortunately, if the mama is too beat to argue they won't even tell her what they are doing.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AmieV</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><snip> I do think that scrubs look super comfy. I'm always jealous of pg nurses because I think those things must be awesome maternity pants!</div>
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That's funny, just the other day I was remembering how when I was 9 months with my dd my normally HUGE scrubs stayed up without being tied. I looked like humpty dumpty in purple, lol. They are really comfy and fairly flattering, IMO, at least they hide flaws.
 

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Just throwing my $.02 in here as a first time MW client for my 2nd pg...<br><br>
The only requirements I think a MW should consider in her dress is too look clean, professional and be comfortable. If scrubs fit the bill for her, then so be it.<br><br>
I personally don't have a problem with scrubs making a MW look too medical. I view MW's as licensed medical professionals. They have years of education and experience and should be respected for it. I expect my MW to have medical knowledge, yet I know her birth philosophy is not that of the medical model. I think some people get hung up on equating a medical professional with a medical model of birth. It doesn't have to be that way. My MW is not my sister or my best friend. She will bring medical equipment to my home birth and knows how to use it *if it is needed*. That doesn't mean she has any "authority" over me or is "in charge" of the way I birth, because I know that is not who she is.<br><br>
And on a personal note, I would be totally grossed out if my MW wore Birks to my home birth. I don't care how clean you are, ALL well worn Birks stink. And flip flops are only professional for a life gaurd or a swim team.<br><br>
RE the costume/theme birth comment:<br>
That is just silly. People wear outfits on different occasions because it is appropriate to do so. That does not make it a costume. When I wore business casual clothes to my corporate office, they certainly weren't what I would consider my personal style. They were just what was appropriate. Nothing more, nothing less.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">And on a personal note, I would be totally grossed out if my MW wore Birks to my home birth. I don't care how clean you are, ALL well worn Birks stink. And flip flops are only professional for a life gaurd or a swim team.</td>
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LOL!<br><br>
I think it's clear from this thread that everyone has a different take on what a midwife should be and that is great! However, we can all have our own ways of doing things and we can all be the kind of midwife we aspire to without passing judgement on others. My way is not the "right" way and neither is anyone elses. Luckily there is enough variety for all clients to choose what they need.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>TBA in PA</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I was taught to take my footwear, whatever they may be, off at the door. It is a matter of respect for me.</div>
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Me too. I never walk on people's carpeting or bathroom floor with shoes on. I always take my shoes off at the door. It also helps me walk quietly into a room, and I just feel more connected to the earth and the birth and all the higher energy that's going on.
 

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Thank you!!! I don't wear my shoes in people's homes PERIOD but especially not at a birth. I have seen midwives climb onto the bed with their shoes on. Ack. I have shoe phobia so I always take mine off.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Sheena</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Thank you!!! I don't wear my shoes in people's homes PERIOD but especially not at a birth. I have seen midwives climb onto the bed with their shoes on. Ack. I have shoe phobia so I always take mine off.</div>
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Everybody has their own personal gross outs. I have a friend with a foot phobia. She even makes her dh wear socks to bed. I'm pretty sure she would murder you if your bare feet came anywhere near her while she birthed <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 
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