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My son is now 7.5 months and did not start eating solids yet. Every so often my husband starts talking about how we need to give him food, (which I dont want to do yet, I dont feel he is ready and hes not really that interested). He thinks that if I dont get him "used" to food and water he wont like anything when hes 2+. Its not like he <i>needs</i> food at all, hes about 22 lbs!<br><br>
Anybody delayed solids and have a picky eater? Thoughts?
 

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Of my parents' 3 kids, they waited the longest with me (6 months... other 2 were something like 2 months and 4 months, as the ped kept changing recommendations), and I am the pickiest eater in the world, BUT... I didn't like most solid foods to begin with, and I think it's actually a genetic pickiness - the kind you don't outgrow. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
I do think that getting lots of tastes in early can be helpful though. So far, both my boys have started right around 6 months (6.5 and 5.5 respectively), and they both like everything so far. My older one is not picky at all. He eats whatever you put in front of him, and really likes red and green veggies. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> The baby doesn't eat much in quantity, but I give him a little taste of everything, in hopes that he'll be like his big brother and not like me!<br><br>
But that said, if your kid isn't interested in solid food, no sense worrying about it. They'll eat when they're ready. Just offer alot of different healthy foods so they develop a taste for these things whenever it is that they do start eating. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Assalamu alaikum,<br>
I think introducing solids too early can create allergies which can create picky eaters.<br><br>
DH was fed solids at 4 months, and has food allergies (which aren't common in his family) and is, due to them, the pickiest eater ever. Any amount of dairy and he won't eat it. Any amount of citrus and he won't eat it. I think a lot of his pickiness is due to his having had reactions to those foods early on so he associates bad things with that food. He's tried some things again recently and he's actually liked them but it took a lot of cajoling. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I'm planning on introducing DD to all the fruits and vegetables out there and several times too. Well, I'm just going to offer. She'll take them when she's ready. I'm seriously holding back on dairy and citrus, and also things that are known to be heavily sprayed like strawberries and peaches unless I get them from a local organic source.
 

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Starting solids is more is more exploration at this point. Since the world is discovered through their mouth at this age, it should be fun and enjoyable. Although I have read that starting to late <b>might</b> create a picky eater, I really do believe that picky eating is more taught that created. I read that if you start to late they have trouble liking textured things and start to believe that all food is liquid, but I think they are talking 1yr+. I would offer foods like sweet potato puree (since BM lacks vit A) and if he likes great, but if not don't push it. He will let you know when he wants to eat solids. Mine couldn't wait to eat but I waited 'till 6 mo and I am still pretty slow at introducing new foods, you are suppose to wait 4 days with a new food to see if they are allergic. BTW, I am allergic to a lot of foods and am not a picky eater. I will eat anything if I am not allergic, because I have always thought food was exciting and was never forced to eat anything I didn't like.
 

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We didn't start Ina on solids 'til she was about 7 months, and the same for SJ ... we knew that Ina had multiple food allergies so waited past six months for her, and for SJ too (we know she reacts to milk if I have any in any form).<br><br>
I know a lot of parents of food allergic kids, describe how their kids were very picky eaters as infants .... I think it's a defense mechanism, in those cases.<br><br>
Ina is not a picky eater despite not starting solids 'til after 7 months. She (at 3 1/2 now) loves pretty much anything we put in front of her (not a huge fan of potatoes though?) -- she eats squash, eggplant, mushrooms, lots of foods which people don't think kids 'like.' I think it's because I eat them, and we watch Food Network so she sees lots of adventurous looking foods that way. She *requested* the eggplant, it's not something that I normally cook, for instance. But she saw it at the store and wanted it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
When we did start solids, it was very small amounts (like, one small infant spoon of it and that was IT) -- and we built up gradually. I started Ina with rice cereal, and that's all she had for over a month (until she had hit 'infant serving size' of it). I really followed her lead. She was more interested in solids than SJ is.<br><br>
SJ, we skipped cereal and started with squash - she has been wanting to eat off our plates (grabbing food) for awhile, but honestly once she gets them, she's not so interested in solids. She likes squash, and likes prunes - I've tried pears, applesauce, peaches, and regular rice (mashed) with her. She especially doesn't like the rice. Honestly - if we didn't have such easy access to infant foods, would we be giving our kids food at this age?? You know? Watching SJ's reaction to rice (twisted her face all up like a cat with a hairball) - she KNOWS that she's not ready for it yet. Back in prehistory, our kids would be either getting foods we'd chewed up first (and probably small bites, essentially tastes), or else be teething on non-chokable things (like a large bone), until they were much older.<br><br>
It's really hard to hold out on giving solids. SJ didn't give cues towards wanting them 'til after 7 months, but even with that, dh (and our families) were very ready for us to give solids, and worried about why we weren't. Apparently there's some research which shows a higher rate of wheat allergy if wheat isn't introduced before 8 months (which is odd, as other sources will say to wait 'til at least 10 months) - but that was trotted out as a concern for why we shouldn't be 'so cautious,' too.<br><br>
Pretty much our approach with SJ is to give her 'tastes' - a few spoonfulls, and as soon as she loses interest we're done, and mostly we just let her play with it on her tray.<br><br>
Ellyn Satter is supposed to have some great books on foods and children (in terms of picky eaters etc.) - and healthy approaches to food issues. I keep meaning to pick her books up, but haven't yet.<br><br>
ETA:<br>
Because of Ina's allergies, we introduced solids slowly (1-2 weeks for each new food) which meant that at a year of age, she had only eaten:<br>
squash, potatoes, beets, carrots<br>
pears, applesauce, peaches, apricots, plums, blueberries, cherries, avocados<br>
wheat (via cooked pasta), rice<br>
beef, and chicken<br><br>
So although she started solids earlier than your little one, she definitely was on what most people would consider "very few" solids 'til past a year of age. No dairy 'til her allergy was outgrown at 19 months, for instance; no chocolate 'til she was nearly 2; didn't even try bananas til she was past a year of age (family history of banana allergy, so we were cautious there)
 

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We delayed with our first and he's the most picky eater in the world, but I think he would have been picky no matter what- he's still a "milk baby" at 29 mo (meaning he'd rather drink his meals smoothies, water, etc)
 

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In my experience I have 5 kids the only child I started solids with early was my first I started with him at the recomended time (4 months at the time) and he is still the pickiest eater at 11 years old<br><br>
All of the rest of my kids were self feeders and didn't start eating solids till 8 months and they all eat everything now there are very few food they won't eat<br>
my oldest if he could choose would live on mr noodles and kraft dinner (I don't even buy those foods so not sure when he decided he likes them)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for your input, I appreciate it. How do you know when babies are interested in food? I mean, Rafiq tries to get everything and put everything in his mouth so how would I know specifically if he wants food or if he is just trying to get it like he does everything else. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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DD is interested in putting food in her mouth but once it's there she spits it out. She's fascinated with food as toys, but it hasn't occurred to her that people *swallow* this stuff. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
When she chews on a carrot for teething, she often reaches into her mouth and fishes out the little bits she's bitten off and flicks them off. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
So, she's almost there, but noooot quite yet.
 

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I have a friend (LC) who says that babies are ready to eat when they are making their parents feel guilty for eating in front of them. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
LLL has a list of cues to watch for, they include- sitting up without assistance, pincer grasp (bring small objects to mouth with their fingers) ...<br><br>
IMO, if baby is happy with an empty spoon, cup, or toy while everyone else is eating food, then baby is probably not ready for solids. Even the AAP says that breastmilk (or formula) should be the primary food for infants under 12 months of age .... solids are mostly for exploration 'til after that age, I think. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
SJ has never had more than probably 2 tsp of solids at a meal, and she gets solids once or twice a day. Most of it is for playing with on her tray. She's far more interested in figuring out how to get her spoon into her mouth just like the rest of us. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
I think a lot of people mistake the oral fascination which babies develop (and their fascination in general with watching what others around them are doing) with readiness to eat. And with our parents, grandparents, and even g-grandparents having been told to get their (generally ff'd infants) onto solids ASAP, it's really hard for people to "let go" of the solids issue, I think. Regardless of what science says today, what they're familar with, is infants given baby food at 3 months of age or etc.<br><br>
Ina had severe reflux, and many people thought that we should start solids early, to "help." We waited anyway but they were pretty sure she'd be done with reflux once solids were introduced. Wrong - she still had reflux, and it didn't get any better. But, once we started solids even though it was small amounts, most of them got off our cases about it. There are still those who think that by 8 months, baby should be using a steak knife to cut up his sirloin steak, but *most* people IME back off once they know some solids are being given. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">
 

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Could it be the opposite, that children who are destined to be naturally picky eaters are ready for solids later?<br><br>
I dunno. Just speculating.<br><br>
Anyway, my DD1 has been the pickiest eater you'll ever meet, and I started her a bit on the early side, with mashed banana at 5 1/2 months.
 

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I started letting my first eat solids at about 8-9 months, my second was 12 months, my third was 27 months. The first is the pickiest eater.
 

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I don't know how typical this is, but here's my $0.02:<br><br>
DS, now 22mo, started tasting solids at about 7 months but wasn't truly eating with gusto until about 13 months. However, starting at that time and still true now, he loves just about everything and eats a remarkable amount of food.
 

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I don't think so. My nephew started "eating" food at 4 months old (I say "eating" because it was extreamly watery purree and shoved into his mouth even though he was not ready) and is the pickiest kid in the world. The list of what he will eat is extreamly short. My dd started eating at 18 months and is also kind of picky, but not compared to her cousin (adn I think most of her issue is she has food allergies and is a food avoider as a result.)
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>twinalicious</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8227740"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">SI would offer foods like sweet potato puree (since BM lacks vit A)</div>
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Everything I have read says that breastmilk is the optimal source of vitamin A and the only reason breastmilk would be deficient is if the mother is deficient in vitamin A. And that can be resolved by ensuring the mother's vitamin A deficiency is resolved.<br><br>
If you've read other information, I'd be interested in finding out what are your sources. Thanks.
 
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