Mothering Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,484 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
<p>Between accusations of currency-fixing (U.S. and China both), the break-downs and bail-outs in Greece and Ireland affecting the Euro, and <a href="http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/2010/1103/Federal-Reserve-to-buy-600-billion-in-bonds-as-hedge-against-deflation" target="_blank">the Fed printing more money to  induce inflation,<span style="display:none;"> </span><span style="display:none;"> </span></a> I guess <span style="display:none;"> </span> I just wouldn't be surprised if the economy (for lack of a better way to put it) double-dipped.  Am I the only one getting a little ansy? </p>
<p> </p>
<p>I remember back in 2008, when this forum was HOPPIN'!  So looking on the bright side, at least a crummy economy will increase our traffic a little!  <span><img alt="wink1.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/wink1.gif"></span></p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,967 Posts
<p>Oh yeah. We are definitely double dipping.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Really, though, can you call it a dip when you never rise back up? I have serious doubts that the US, as we know it, will EVER recover.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
<p>OP, love your signature! I miss the old format, too. I do NOT like this new one!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Anyway, back on topic, I'm a bit antsy, too. There are just not alot of good numbers/stats out there that warrants short-term optimism, imo. And long term? Not sure either. I hope I'm wrong but I have a feeling that the US glory days are over. Too many strong up and comers as far as other countries in the world these days and we just keep digging ourselves deeper as far as the economy, education, health, national debt, bipartisan fighting, etc. I don't know, it's like there's something around every corner. I'm leery -- and weary -- of the state of our country these days.</p>
<p> </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,931 Posts
<p>I'm scared, totally.  Though I really liked Usually Curious' suggestion that you can't call it a dip if you never come back up again.  I have believed since late 2008 that the US was changing permanently never to be the same as it was again.  I doubt anyone will admit to it but the mindset in the US is entirely different than it was just a few years ago.  It's not quite spend, spend, spend like it was.  Frugality has become popular and trendy and getting a "deal" on something is actually desirable instead of parading around the expensive new Coach purse you just got for $500.</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,834 Posts
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>sweetjasmine</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1281197/does-it-smell-like-recession#post_16069170"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>OP, love your signature! I miss the old format, too. I do NOT like this new one!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Anyway, back on topic, I'm a bit antsy, too. There are just not alot of good numbers/stats out there that warrants short-term optimism, imo. And long term? Not sure either. I hope I'm wrong but I have a feeling that the US glory days are over. Too many strong up and comers as far as other countries in the world these days and we just keep digging ourselves deeper as far as the economy, education, health, national debt, bipartisan fighting, etc. I don't know, it's like there's something around every corner. I'm leery -- and weary -- of the state of our country these days.</p>
<p> </p>
</div>
</div>
<p><span><img alt="yeahthat.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/yeahthat.gif">  (and I hate how long it took me to get that smiley vs. just typing out the code--which is the same, but didn't work when I did it in another post  :mad:  )</span></p>
<p> </p>
<p>I just finished my Master's in education and the research on how long we've been miseducating the majority to be followers and unable to do any kind of critical analysis or research was so profoundly disturbing that I finally understood how our gov't was making the decisions it made (and why we rank 15th & 17th in the world among industrialized nations for academic performance).  So I'm wondering how we'll manage to pull out of that pit.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>So much is changing.  On one hand, it's a good thing:  people aren't happy and they're making changes that need to be made.  They're being as careful with their money as they should've been all along.  People unhappy with our education system are sacrificing to be home and homeschool.  And for many, as they start to think more critically about these other things, it's spilling over into their diet and health.  All good things... for the individuals.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>But as a country... ugh.  Greece had the EU to bail them out and even then, Germany played a major role in that because they had a LOT to lose if Greece defaulted.  Spain and Portugal were next in line and now Ireland is on the chopping block.  But all of them looked like we do now before the fall--and that's seriously disturbing.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I'm thanking God EVERY. SINGLE. DAY. that we came into money that moved our debt repayment up two years and we are currently debt-free.  I seriously couldn't imagine it getting worse and possibly having dh lose his job with that hanging over us.  It was planned and in retro, it was the best way to accomplish what we did and saved our butts in other ways--but it's not a situation I want to be in again.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>BTW, I thought we had two consecutive quarters of positive movement in the economy?  That's all they need to declare the end of the recession and therefore declare a "double-dip" if we go down again.</p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>heatherdeg</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1281197/does-it-smell-like-recession#post_16076641"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container">
<div class="quote-block"><span> </span></div>
</div>
<p>BTW, I thought we had two consecutive quarters of positive movement in the economy?  That's all they need to declare the end of the recession and therefore declare a "double-dip" if we go down again.</p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
</div>
</div>
<p><br><br>
The so-called "positive movement" doesn't even begin to compare to normal levels in prior years. It's positive only in the sense that it isn't going downhill anymore or remaining flat. That's not cause to declare that the recession is over as far as I'm concerned. Poor criteria in my book but that's how some economists and most talking heads view it.</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,834 Posts
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>sweetjasmine</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1281197/does-it-smell-like-recession#post_16077425"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>heatherdeg</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1281197/does-it-smell-like-recession#post_16076641"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container">
<div class="quote-block"><span> </span></div>
</div>
<p>BTW, I thought we had two consecutive quarters of positive movement in the economy?  That's all they need to declare the end of the recession and therefore declare a "double-dip" if we go down again.</p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
</div>
</div>
<p><br><br>
The so-called "positive movement" doesn't even begin to compare to normal levels in prior years. It's positive only in the sense that it isn't going downhill anymore or remaining flat. That's not cause to declare that the recession is over as far as I'm concerned. Poor criteria in my book but that's how some economists and most talking heads view it.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p>ABSOLUTELY AND TOTALLY AGREED that it is absolutely nothing like normal levels, it was just upward movement--no matter how minimal.  I'm just saying--that is what they use to make the statements about there being a "double dip".</p>
<p> </p>
<p><br>
 </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
<p>Yes, and I don't understand why they do that and why don't they just tell us the truth so we can get on with the business of turning things around no matter how difficult it may be? I think it just lulls some people into a false sense of security. For me and my family though, I don't want to take any chances. I want to be frugal and save as much as I can. I keep hearing "they're just kicking the can down the road." In other words, if we don't take austerity measures right now it might just be worse for our children and grandchildren. Although, austerity measures taken in France, Greece and England recently caused riots in the streets. Sometimes I wonder if Americans would do the same. Scary times these days. :(</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,834 Posts
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>sweetjasmine</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1281197/does-it-smell-like-recession#post_16079855"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>Yes, and I don't understand why they do that and why don't they just tell us the truth so we can get on with the business of turning things around no matter how difficult it may be? I think it just lulls some people into a false sense of security. For me and my family though, I don't want to take any chances. I want to be frugal and save as much as I can. I keep hearing "they're just kicking the can down the road." In other words, if we don't take austerity measures right now it might just be worse for our children and grandchildren. Although, austerity measures taken in France, Greece and England recently caused riots in the streets. Sometimes I wonder if Americans would do the same. Scary times these days. :(</p>
</div>
</div>
<br><br><p>Americans don't appear to give a hoot about what belies their children and grandchildren.  If they did, recycling would be more rampant and San Diego's construction code wouldn't be specific to San Diego.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I wonder if the austerity measures WOULD provoke riots.  Hard to say.  Most of the measures taken in those countries have hit the public sector employees hardest (and really, not so much "hard" as "no longer living the high life").  I'm sure there were be protests here.  Look at NJ when they tried to implement new pension plans for incoming teachers and grandfathering the existing teachers under their old plan rules--so you came into it knowing what you were getting into.  Well, the teachers union FLIPPED. OUT.  They also got what they wanted.  Same for another sector of gov't employees but I can't remember which one.  That was before Christie came into office there, or I wonder if they'd have gotten what they wanted.  Christie is certainly trying to close budget gaps in NJ with a vengeance.  We just need the rest of the gov't to follow suit.  It's POSSIBLE if you don't mind ticking people off.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,484 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
<p>Well, there are are some pretty easy austerity measures that our power-holders wouldn't dream of taking. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>1. Not only should members of Congress stop voting for their own raises (conflict of interest, anyone? <span><img alt="eyesroll.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/eyesroll.gif">) but they should all take a voluntary pay cut.</span></p>
<p><span>2. Cut all of the perks and pork.  You want a limo ride, you pay for your own. </span></p>
<p><span>3. <a href="http://www.fcnl.org/issues/item.php?item_id=3538&issue_id=19" target="_blank">Cut military spending.</a>  Massively. </span></p>
<p>4. Extend unemployment benefits.  It sounds counterintuitive to a lot of lawmakers, but a high unemployment rate is going to cost more jobs and place a huge burden on our social services.</p>
<p>5. Get corporations off welfare.  Adam Smith did not have this set-up in mind...</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Let's try those first, then we'll discuss those other riot-vulnerable austerity measures.</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,834 Posts
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Usually Curious</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1281197/does-it-smell-like-recession#post_16089558"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>Austerity is the new normal. Get used to it.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p><br>
I don't see where we have any austerity in the U.S. to GET used to...?  What am I missing?</p>
<p> </p>
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Turquesa</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1281197/does-it-smell-like-recession#post_16082878"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>Well, there are are some pretty easy austerity measures that our power-holders wouldn't dream of taking. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>1. Not only should members of Congress stop voting for their own raises (conflict of interest, anyone? <span><img alt="eyesroll.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/eyesroll.gif">) but they should all take a voluntary pay cut.</span></p>
<p><span>2. Cut all of the perks and pork.  You want a limo ride, you pay for your own. </span></p>
<p><span>3. <a href="http://www.fcnl.org/issues/item.php?item_id=3538&issue_id=19" target="_blank">Cut military spending.</a>  Massively. </span></p>
<p>4. Extend unemployment benefits.  It sounds counterintuitive to a lot of lawmakers, but a high unemployment rate is going to cost more jobs and place a huge burden on our social services.</p>
<p>5. Get corporations off welfare.  Adam Smith did not have this set-up in mind...</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Let's try those first, then we'll discuss those other riot-vulnerable austerity measures.</p>
</div>
</div>
<br><br><p>Totally agreed.  And as you noted in your first item, the people voting for these things are the ones most affected by them--thus they won't vote for them (corporations getting off welfare hurts them in campaign contributions).</p>
<p> </p>
<p>I find it remarkable that the gov't got so upset seeing some of the lavish things the corporations did after the bailout--pulling them into DC to chastise them... like they had ANY. BUSINESS.  Glass houses, anyone?</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,172 Posts
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Usually Curious</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1281197/does-it-smell-like-recession#post_16089558"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>Austerity is the new normal. Get used to it.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p><br><br>
Yep.  At the mico level my household has.  If we could just get there as a culture and stop spending money we don't have we would be doing great.  I really don't think growing GDP is in America's best interest in the first place or a very good measure of the health and well being of its population.  </p>
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top