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my friend is pregnant with her first, and though she had hoped to go with a midwife, she has been advised that her PKU puts her in the too-high-risk-for-a-midwife category...does anyone know if this is actually true?
 

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Is there more than one thing called PKU?<br><br>
As far as I know, the PKU test is done on newborns within a few days of birth. My homebirth MW can do it. If your HB MW doesn't, you usually just go to a pediatrician within a few days to have it done.<br><br>
I know the PKU test originally tested for one condition. I don't remember what that condition is. Could it be that she has this condition?<br><br>
If she asked an OB or other medical professional, they are likely going to tell her that there is NO WAY she can have a MW. OBs generally think MWs are not capable of handling births, because they believe birth to be a complicated and difficult thing, and they think of MWs as nurses. My OB told me that if I go with a MW, the baby would likely live, but be too brain damaged to work anywhere but in McDonalds for the rest of his life. The OB then went on to tell me that MWs can't give Vitamin K and eye drops, can't sew you up if you tear, etc. None of that was true.
 

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The sad thing is, a lot of CNM practices are unable, because of the way that their practice guidelines are written, to take on women who are high-risk for any reason.<br><br>
A woman with PKU isn't any better off with an OB than she is with a midwife -- OBs certainly aren't experts in nutrition.<br><br>
I think she does need to be monitored by someone who is an expert in PKU and who can design a diet for her that provides just enough Phenylalaline for the baby while not providing too much. She will also need frequent blood levels taken.<br><br>
I think she should try to work with a midwife, whether a CNM or traditional midwife, but also seek out the experts for co-care that can help give her the information that she needs to keep her and her baby safe.
 

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PKU is nutrtional, not gynecological<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:<br><br>
I don't see how it could matter who she sees or what enviornmet she wants to give birth, provided she either knows what she is doing nutritionally or is seeing a nutritionist who can advise her both on pregnancy and caring for the baby (who if i'm not mistaken is more likely to have this too?)
 

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<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenylketonuria#Maternal_phenylketonuria" target="_blank">Wikipedia on PKU</a><br><br>
Since the correct course of action doesn't occur AT the birth, but leading up to iit, I don't see why it matters where or how the birth itself occurs.
 
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