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Discussion Starter #1
At my son's WBV yesterday I was chastised for not giving him enough solid food. DS is almost 8 mo and just not that interested in solids. He loves to nurse, and we still nurse very frequently, but the pediatrician said I need to be giving him solids 3 times a day.<br><br>
Also, the doctor said that I should be giving him a vitamin supplement. I thought that he was getting all of the vitamins he needs through my BM except for Vitamin D. Am I wrong?<br><br>
DS is very healthy and happy. On the 10th he'll be 8 months old and he is 21 pounds. He is smart, clever, social, happy. He's not crawling yet but he's sitting well and pushing up on his hands and knees (just not going anywhere yet). I thought all was well.<br><br>
Advice?
 

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Sounds like your little one is thriving off your milk and he'll be interested in solids when he's ready. I wouldn't worry about a thing! (Basically: I'd ignore your ped on this)
 

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Ignore your doctor.<br><br>
If your baby isn't interested in solids now there is no point in forcing them on him and he doesn't need them for nutrition. Breastmilk should be providing the bulk of nutrition for him up until at least a year old anyway. Right now he is eating solids to learn to eat solids and just like every other developmental milestone he is going to mature faster than some and slower than others.<br><br>
If you are concerned about vit. D he is old enough to eat egg yolks if he wants them but again I wouldn't force it. My 3yo absolutely loved them and my 17mo wants nothing to do with them at all.
 

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My daughter wasn't terribly interested in solids until she was over a year and she was fine. Her pediatrician was fine with this too. I would ignore your doctor.<br><br>
I was giving her a multivitamin around 8 months, but only because I was having trouble locating vitamin D drops locally that weren't made by a formula manufacturer. She definitely didn't <i>need</i> the multivitamin.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>fruitfulmomma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15371767"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Ignore your doctor.<br><br>
If your baby isn't interested in solids now there is no point in forcing them on him and he doesn't need them for nutrition. Breastmilk should be providing the bulk of nutrition for him up until at least a year old anyway. Right now he is eating solids to learn to eat solids and just like every other developmental milestone he is going to mature faster than some and slower than others.<br><br>
If you are concerned about vit. D he is old enough to eat egg yolks if he wants them but again I wouldn't force it. My 3yo absolutely loved them and my 17mo wants nothing to do with them at all.</div>
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It was my understanding that he should still be getting the bulk of his nutrition from my breast milk, but then I get this look from the doctor like I'm a terrible mother and starving my child and it makes me panic. (If you can't tell, I'm a first-time mommy and still unsure of myself sometimes.)<br><br>
I would love to get more Vitamin D for him (because we live on the rainy Oregon coast) but he seems to have a sensitivity to eggs. He gets terrible baby acne whenever I eat them. I've cut them completely out of my diet (along with dairy and gluten, but gluten is because of my sensitivity, not his.). Do you know of any other food sources of Vitamin D?<br><br>
Thanks for the reassurance. I've been unhappy with this ped for a variety of reasons, and this visit just solidified that I need to look elsewhere for the health care of my child.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>rparker</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15371821"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My daughter wasn't terribly interested in solids until she was over a year and she was fine. Her pediatrician was fine with this too. I would ignore your doctor.<br><br>
I was giving her a multivitamin around 8 months, but only because I was having trouble locating vitamin D drops locally that weren't made by a formula manufacturer. She definitely didn't <i>need</i> the multivitamin.</div>
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Thanks for this. It always helps to hear other mamas' success stories. What multivitamin did you decide to use? I would like to get vit. D but I don't want to be supporting formula companies either.
 

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This website <a href="http://whfoods.org/nutrientstoc.php" target="_blank">http://whfoods.org/nutrientstoc.php</a> is great for getting a list of foods high in specific nutrients. The big ones for vitamin d would be milk, eggs, and seafood. If you like and can tolerate sea food you might offer it to him.<br><br>
Kellymom.com has some interesting thoughts on vitamin supplements for nursing babies that might be of some help to you in sorting this all out.<br><br>
Also, I love Nina Planck's book Real Food for Mother and Baby which goes into more details about first foods and the moms diet and such.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>4myfinn</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15371931"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Thanks for this. It always helps to hear other mamas' success stories. What multivitamin did you decide to use? I would like to get vit. D but I don't want to be supporting formula companies either.</div>
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Honestly she's been on so many different brands of multivitamins at this point that I've lost track. I mostly just bought her whatever our local co-op stocked that looked decent. (For some reason they keep changing the brands of kids vitamins that they stock.) The one brand I remember for sure is Dr. Greens.<br><br>
I did eventually end up finding straight vitamin D drops from a few different companies. The current one we're using is from a company called ChildLife (<a href="http://www.childlife.net" target="_blank">www.childlife.net</a>). NOW makes a plain vitamin D drop for adults which would be the same stuff but maybe not as palatable. (The kids ones are all berry flavored.) I've also seen mentions on MDC of a vitamin D drop by Carlson for kids.<br><br>
Do you have a co-op or a Whole Foods or a semi-crunchy health food store where your live? They could probably point you toward something decent. It's kind of sad that if you go into almost any drug store they'll only have drops made by Enfamil and that you have to go the smaller "natural" stores to find anything independent.<br><br>
I didn't feel the need to supplement her at all when we lived in a really sunny part of CA, but then we moved to northern MI where there is practically zero sunlight half the year. LLL is even now recommending vitamin D supplementation in exclusively breastfed babies which convinced me more than anything by the AAP ever could. I'll probably give this next baby vitamin D drops from a much younger age.<br><br>
I feel like the multivitamins are also starting to get a little necessary for her, but that's because she's two and gets most of her nutrition from non-breastmilk sources... some days her diet is great and other days it totally sucks. I envy you that you still have a little guy who is happy to eat mostly breast milk <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>4myfinn</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15371841"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would love to get more Vitamin D for him (because we live on the rainy Oregon coast) but he seems to have a sensitivity to eggs.</div>
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I haven't read the other replies, but you can supplement yourself with D and he <span style="text-decoration:underline;">will</span> get it through your breastmilk. I take 5,000IU/day, which helped raise both mine and DD's deficiencies to a decent level (they still could be better, but we're getting there.)
 

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You've gotten lots of good replies but I thought you might want to hear about another kid who just wasn't intrested in solids till later.<br><br>
I offered dd solids starting at around 6 months. She HATED being spoon fed and short of force feeding her it wasn't going to happen. Since I wasn't willing to force it, we gave up on purees really quickly. I offered her all kinds of soft foods, sweet potato fries, steamed carrots and apples, pasta, chicken and turkey in small pieces etc. She played with and tasted most of it but didn't consume more than a tablespoon or 2 a day until well after a year. Around 15 months she picked up on her solids consumption. Now at 25 months she goes through stages. For weeks she'll be a light eater, then she'll start eating almost adult sized portions of some things and be eager to try new foods. I'm really thankful to still be nursing her so I can relax about the times when she eats less.<br><br>
She is on the small side for her age (25%tile for weight) but she's a bright, happy, active child.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>changingseasons</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15372457"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I haven't read the other replies, but you can supplement yourself with D and he <span style="text-decoration:underline;">will</span> get it through your breastmilk. I take 5,000IU/day, which helped raise both mine and DD's deficiencies to a decent level (they still could be better, but we're getting there.)</div>
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The efficacy of maternal vitamin D supplementation while breastfeeding hasn't been proven. From LLL:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Although supplementation of a lactating mother should be recommended for her health benefits, the dose at which supplementation of the mother would also benefit the breastfeeding infant has yet to be clearly defined. Therefore, at this time, supplementation of the breastfeeding infant with 400 IU of vitamin D per day should continue to be recommended.</td>
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Here's the entire article: <a href="http://www.llli.org/llleaderweb/LV/LVIss1-2009p2.html" target="_blank">http://www.llli.org/llleaderweb/LV/LVIss1-2009p2.html</a>
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>rparker</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15373768"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">The efficacy of maternal vitamin D supplementation while breastfeeding hasn't been proven. From LLL:</div>
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No, I suppose personal experience isn't proof. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked"><br><br>
DD's level was 11 when we had her tested, and mine was 20. Both of us were SEVERELY deficient. I started 5,000IU/day for myself, and when we were rechecked 3 months later DD was in the 20's and I was up to 30. A year later, DD was at 30, me at 50. Obviously, we still have a ways to go, and I could supplement more aggressively, but I'm comfortable raising our levels slowly with supplementation. (I actually would be supplementing DD directly by this point, but she reacts strongly to D supplements when she takes them.)
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>4myfinn</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15371716"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I thought all was well.<br><br>
Advice?</div>
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All <b>is</b> well, in your heart of heart you know it is. Some drs like every child to fit into this little box and if anyone is different - it's a catastrophe!! As LLL has been saying for the last 50 years + the second 6 months in a baby's life you can introduce solids, but look out for the signs of readiness, the thumb and forefinger pincer, no tongue thrust, baby can sit unassisted for a reasonable amount of time, the introduction of solids should be just that - giving breastmilk first and then letting baby taste his first foods, this should be a journey of discovery of tastes and textures and not three full meals a day, the 6 month limit may even be changing soon (within the next couple of years) to 9 months, so really don't worry about it and maybe if you're worried about the next visit then go with information and studies that can back you up and maybe educate the healthcare provider at the same time. Sounds all good to me as well - you're doing great!!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>changingseasons</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15373807"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">No, I suppose personal experience isn't proof. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked"><br><br>
DD's level was 11 when we had her tested, and mine was 20. Both of us were SEVERELY deficient. I started 5,000IU/day for myself, and when we were rechecked 3 months later DD was in the 20's and I was up to 30. A year later, DD was at 30, me at 50. Obviously, we still have a ways to go, and I could supplement more aggressively, but I'm comfortable raising our levels slowly with supplementation. (I actually would be supplementing DD directly by this point, but she reacts strongly to D supplements when she takes them.)</div>
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I'm sorry. I wasn't trying to imply that you didn't have success raising your and your DD's vitamin D levels, however, the experience of one individual/family still doesn't translate into "this will work for most people" or even "this is a safe course of action for most people."<br><br>
The OP asked if there was any merit in her doctor's advice and while most of it was crap there is pretty solid evidence that vitamin D deficiency is an actual problem that can have severe consequences if not caught. Currently the safest way to guard against vitamin D deficiency for most people is to supplement the individual directly. This makes it more likely that the child is getting an adequate dose. It also makes it less likely that the mother won't get too high of a dose of a fat soluble vitamin in her efforts to make sure that an adequate amount is transferred to her breast milk. Of course this doesn't work for everyone as illustrated by the case of your DD who can't tolerate direct supplementation. For the majority of mothers and babies, however, it is considered by most reputable sources to be the safest course of action.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CoBabyMaker</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15371752"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Sounds like your little one is thriving off your milk and he'll be interested in solids when he's ready. I wouldn't worry about a thing! (Basically: I'd ignore your ped on this)</div>
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This exactly! Some Dr.s just don't know what they should about breastfeeding. Sounds like you are doing everything you should be...listening to your son. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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Umm my DS had barely even started solids at that point, I think he would eat maybe a slice of banana for dinner and that was it for the whole day! And we did not do vitamins (except a little Vitamin D in the winter)... He is just fine and I'm sure your DS is too.<br><br>
I saw an increased interest in solids around 9mos & again around 1yr and finally at 15mos he is starting to have a little interest in 3 meals but it's still just a few bites for breakfast/lunch/snacks, he's more a dinner kind of kid!
 
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