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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As stupid as this sounds I'm really worried about how my (2 in October) dog will adjust to the new baby come November. He's used to tons of attention and will just jump in your lap and lay down for a nap or curl up next to you and nap. We call him cuddle slut all the time. He is not going to be getting near the amount of attention he does now when Smudge arrives and it's going to be a big shocker to him.<br><br>
Plus he sleeps in our bed, usually snuggled up behind my knees or by DH's feet. When it's cold he tries to cuddle our heads and usually ends up by my back. I know this is not going to work once we start cosleeping and starting in September I plan on starting to get him to sleep in his crate. He's crate trained and loves his crate, but I still feel kind of guilty.<br><br>
Please tell me I'm not insane to be worried about my puppy when I have a baby coming home.
 

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You're definitely not insane and it's great that you love your doggie so much that you're worried. I'm going through the same dilemma. No children for DH and me, just our super spoiled dog. She sleeps on the bed with us and is my shadow throughout the day.<br><br>
DH and I are also going to gradually wean her off our bed and into her own bed. We've tried a couple nights but she'll whimper and then just sit on the floor at the foot of the bed and give her pathetic little stare.
 

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I'm in Oct DDC but saw your post. I took a quick class in dealing w/ dogs & kids that was helpful. I have a dog walker that recommended the book linked below. I thought it was really good as well. Can't remember the details. In my situation things have worked out well w/ the 2 dogs but realize that every situation is different. The dog that I thought might be difficult has been really good and vice versa. Think I would recommend the crate sleeping earlier rather then later. We do this w/ one dog who likes the kennel and she's absolutely fine. She hangs out in there early when she's tired. Good luck.<br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FChildproofing-Your-Dog-Complete-Preparing%2Fdp%2F0446670162%2Fref%3Dpd_bbs_sr_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1214892297%26sr%3D8-1" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Childproofing-...4892297&sr=8-1</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm definitely going to check that book out. Thanks!
 

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When our daughter was born we had two dogs, 50-60 lbs each, who slept with us and were our babies.<br>
After dd came alone, sometimes they got kicked out of bed, sometimes they managed to not take up 75% of the bed. But they LOVED having a baby to look after. They acted like sentries.<br>
They never stepped on the baby or even crowded her.<br><br>
The cat on the other hand, immediately began sleeping in the guest room and wouldn't look at me for three months. He was harsh.<br><br>
So go ahead and worry, but know that it may turn out great and your dog may adore the baby and have no problems at all. Just don't completely forget about the dog once the baby arrives.
 

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I was super worried about my dogs when I was pregnant with my first. I was on bedrest the last 6 weeks of my pregnancy and they were in the bed or chair with me pretty much 24/7 except to eat and go outside. They were really spoiled before that anyway but we became even more bonded then after spending all day and night together every day for so long. Once the baby was born, it was hard at first because they still wanted to be in my lap whenever I sat down, which was a lot because of nursing. My chihuahua would push in right beside the baby's head to get in her spot. My poodle was a little more laid back though. When he was tiny, my chihuahua would come running to me if the baby cried and I wasn't right there. She would run back and forth between us trying to let me know I needed to do something. Now that my son is almost 3, they have a love/hate relationship because he torments her a lot. She is a shadow to me though and always has to be by my side. It can be a problem because she won't back down and my son doesn't always want her next to me. My poodle is much easier though, she mainly just uses avoidance as her tactic and so she doesn't have as much of a problem with him. I don't know what, if anything, you can really do to help get the dogs ready for a baby. I think you just have to wait and see how the personalities of the dogs and you and the baby mesh once that time comes.
 

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We were also worried about our dog who was 18 months when DD#2 was born. She's a high energy, super social, nuerotic, needy boxer/lab mix. Every tme anyone expresses concern about their dog with the baby, I share this picture of them about 12-20 hours after Gloria was born:<br><br><a href="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v125/buckysprplmonkey/Gloria2yr/gloria061406002.jpg" target="_blank">Awesome picture</a><br><br>
Sure she's still under foot sometimes to get attention, but she's gentle and loving with both the kids (DD#1 was 5 when we got the dog). And I swear that dog knows that there's something scary going on in the family right now and she's reacting perfectly. Lots of extra love and cuddles (getting a boxer to slow down for a cuddle is a big deal!).<br><br>
Oh, and I never have to mop the food off the floor when the kids make a mess at dinner. Dogs are a must have when you've got kids, if you ask me.
 

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When DC3 seemed to be on the way (this time for real! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy">: )we started training our lap-slut "puppy" Sunny (she's full grown Golden) to lay BESIDE us and not on us. When she'd jump up we'd have a shove competition till she layed down next to us instead of on us. It didn't take long, now she's content to curl up in our sides, or lay her head across our knee and there's still plenty of room for baby!<br><br>
We never let her sleep with us because I wanted the whole bed free/clean for lounging with baby and BFing, and so that habit never started... no advice for you there. sry.<br><br>
We just got another Golden who's 5yrs old. We're waiting to see how he will handle the extra activity and noise of a new babe....
 

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I'm not in your DDC but wanted to post as we have four dogs and two cats and am looking forward to blending a baby into the pack.<br><br>
The Childproofing book that someone referenced is great for anyone with dogs and kids.<br><br>
What's really important with any dog is that they understand where they are in the pack order. Your baby should be "dominant" over them, even though your baby could care less at this point. But to avoid problems as the baby ages, ensure that the dogs understand that the baby is higher than they are in the pack order. So if your dog is on the couch, get the dog off of the couch and then sit down with the baby. The baby should eat first, too. Eventually you can have your toddler+ start "helping" you feed the dogs, which is another dominance sign.<br><br>
Some dogs get all of this quite naturally and there is never a problem. Still, dogs are animals and can be unpredictable so doing some preparation and alpha reinforcement makes life less confusing and generally better for all involved. Dogs are really uncomfortable when they don't know where they stand in a pack.<br><br>
We have two dogs that it won't be a problem with, but one of them will need to be watched and the fourth I'm just not sure. He's a very old dog and while very sweet, a little one might make him quite cranky.
 

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we have a 15 month st. bernard we call the "love sponge". we always socialized her around kids (easy to do in the city) expecting to have kids eventually, but she's been even needier since i got pregnant. we make sure she knows who is boss. who wants a dog that's bigger than you challenging your authority? plus, she's going back to chicago in a couple of weeks when we go on vacation and my parents are pretty strict with animals and kids.<br><br>
one of my sisters had a baby nov. 2007, so we're going to have her spend some time w/zocha to get her more used to the baby, the crying, smell of diapers, etc. do you know anybody with kids you can have over? some exposure in a controlled environment might help. i've heard a lot of good things about taking home something from the hospital that smells like the baby. we're having ours at home, so i just let her sniff away when she's curious. until she gooses me.
 

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I was on bed rest the last two months of my pregnancy with my first and my dachshund was by my side the whole time and I worried about jealousy with her but when we brought out daughter home, it was completely unexpected. The dog wouldn't let the baby out of her sight. Whined when she cried, slept next to her cradle, and chased the cats away if they got within 5 feet of wherever she was. It was crazy. She has always been a social dog but began growling and snarling at people she didn't know who came to see the baby (we put a stop to that one).<br>
When dd was a couple months old dh and I had to go out of town and would be getting home late so she stayed all night with grandma. When we got home, we were greeted by the short legged protector and when we weren't carrying a baby all hell broke loose. The dog ran in circles, howling and whimpering, from room to room, back and forth ALL NIGHT LONG! It was terrible. She was in a complete panic.<br><br>
I guess the point of that big long story is that animals will surprise you and I'm sure everything will be fine<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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You have gotten such great advice already. I really think it will not be as hard as you imagine if your dog already knows the pack order. We have an 11 month old labradoodle and though she gets lots and lots of love, she also knows that the human members of the family are the pack leaders. We eat first, we walk through a door first, etc. Although we didn't get Rosie until Kayley was 5, I am not worried about her with the new baby. But if things don't work out the way I hope, we have a trainer in mind to help.
 
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