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<p>Hi,</p>
<p>This is a little long, but after a lot of heart searching I have decided I want to become a doula.</p>
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<p>I am actually a PhD scientist right now. All my life I thought that is what I wanted, but now that I am one it just isn't for me. I have actually had a lot of success with it but after birthing two children (one a bad experience with a scheduled induction and the second a beautiful redeeming natural birth) I HATE the PhD lifestyle. It is simply way way too much time away from my children, it is a cold environment that is not at all accommodating to families, particularly young mothers. My children and birth experiences have changed my life for the better and I want to help other women have that experience.</p>
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<p>Now I would love to become a doula. I am not looking to make much money (or any really) but would like to make a difference in a family oriented career. There are a few doula certification programs out there and I am not sure which one to choose. DONA seems great but are there other options out there that I should consider? If I were to become a doula, what would mothers look for in a certification?</p>
 

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<p>It seems to me most mothers look for a connection with a potential doula. Someone they feel comfortable around and they would feel comfortable with and supported by at their birth. It seems like the rest (certification, even experience sometimes) is just sauce you know?  <br>
I bet for some, they want to see credentials though.<br>
I actually asked a similar question a week or so ago-- asking what they teach in DONA workshops, trying to decide what prgm. to go with. The members here gave me good advice saying find out who teaches the trainings in my area.</p>
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<p>Try Childbirth International's site to see a list comparing some (not all) various doula-certification programs.<br>
<a href="http://www.childbirthinternational.com/birth_doula/compare.htm" target="_blank">http://www.childbirthinternational.com/birth_doula/compare.htm</a><br>
If you can find a doula group in your area I bet you'll find a lot of encouragement and inspiration too. :)  You can learn so much even from just having a conversation with one single doula!  Welcome! </p>
 

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<p>Yes, the previous poster is right - what matters more is a) finding a group that fits your philosophy (DONA, CAPPA, ICEA, ALACE, Childbirth International, etc).  Once you find that then also look at the trainers - talk to people who have taken the training because some trainers are great and others really aren't so good and it would be a waste of money.  </p>
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<p>You can also start to immerse yourself into the community by finding out if there is a local support group, start reading the books on the list for the organization you feel fits with you and stuff like that.</p>
 

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<p>Congrats. I am also a PhD turned doula. Here are the things I think you should consider:</p>
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<p>1. Who is certifying most of the other doulas in your area? If everyone seems to be DONA, then it might make sense to be DONA. If it's a real mix, then your options will be more open.</p>
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<p>2. Who is offering trainings in your area that you could attend? If no one is offering trainings and you would have to travel far or wait a long time, then perhaps something more flexible like CBI makes the most sense for you?</p>
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<p>3. Are their trainers who are local for you? Connecting with the local doula community is really valuable and a local trainer is a real asset to you in your future work. If there is someone local, I would strong consider training with her.</p>
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<p>4. What appeals to you the most? If one of the programs speaks most strongly to you, then I would lean towards that one.</p>
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<p>Good luck!</p>
 
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