Mothering Forum banner

Do you think that you should pay a doula for a homebirth?

  • Yes

    Votes: 162 95.3%
  • No

    Votes: 5 2.9%
  • Other: Please explain:

    Votes: 3 1.8%
41 - 60 of 65 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
"That's like saying, if you come to see me and you have extreme pain, that your adjustment should cost more, cause I have to do more work. Nope.. my time is my time, and it costs the same no matter what. (unless i do a reduced fee.)"<br><br>
My experience has shown over and over, for me, that I have a huge amount LESS stress at the homebirths I attend, the labors go faster, the mothers do experience less pain, the caregivers are truly caring, there is no fear/worry/anxiety, and by golly - it's an all around nice place to be. I charge less for that reason. I work a lot harder in the hospital.<br><br>
That's just me. I am not saying everyone should reduce thier fee, of course not. But because I do not have to work near as hard, I charge less...and I feel really good about that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Boy did you open a can of worms with this one!!!!!!!!<br><br>
If I didn't get paid to be a doula or midwife I wouldn't be able to attend women as either! I would have to have another job to pay my bills & feed my family.<br><br>
While I enjoy attending birthing women, especially at home, it's not about me & my 'joy' of attending a birth... it's about how I can benefit a birthing family, being available for them at a moments notice 24/7 from the time that they hire me to be their doula. Advocacy is only a small part of my job & is best left to the birthing family!<br><br>
Seeing a baby come out of a vagina whether at home or in the hospital doesn't buy food for my children or pay my bills ,whether I 'enjoy' the birth or not!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
Yes, All professionals should get paid for their work, regardless of the work they do. I pay my plumber, I pay my doctor, I pay my dry cleaner. I would definitely give a very close friend a serious discount, but thats not even saying anyone else should do so, its just my personal preference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,358 Posts
If you are speaking in terms of clients, I don't think the location matters, you should be paid for the service you provide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,984 Posts
I am not a doula, MW, or anything of that sort...I would pay anyone who helps me out if/when I had the means too.<br><br>
I am commenting on the fact that I'm kind of sad that people would think that a paycheck is equal to proving worthiness in your life's work. I'm pretty sure that is the kind of thinking that makes society undermine a SAHM's value. You don't make money, so what value are you!?<br>
Proposterous.<br><br>
Midwives, Doulas, Childbirth educators - You all deserve to be paid SO MUCH more then you earn. But IMNSHO, even if the currency you recieved for your hard work was dirt - Your value in society has not been comprimised, you are still just as special, worthy, & needed. How much you are paid dosen't validate your profession any more then being a size 2 makes you a healthy eater, or driving a hummer makes you a better person then the person in the Geo...<br><br>
Hoping I didn't piss anyone off<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"><br>
Katie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,440 Posts
Of course we should charge for homebirth! What, a client calls our business, and we say "oh, you're birthing at home? Oh, ok, no charge!"<br>
Give me a break!<br><br>
IMO, you may need to examine how YOU practice. If you are not "doing as much" at a home birth, you may need to check yourself and see if your not just making assumptions that just because Mama is home, that she doesn't need assistance as much.<br>
Homebirths are indeed lovely to attend, but it is an honor to attend a birth no matter what the setting. Quite honestly some of the longest, most challenging births I've been to have been homebirths. Just because a Mom has decided to birth at home does not mean she is totally free from doubt, worry, anxiety. It CERTAINLY does not mean she is free of discomfort, or the need for food, drink, ideas for positions, encouragement, help for her partner, help with a toddler or older child etc... on and on....<br>
The midwife is not always there the whole time...I've attended women for hours and hours before a midwife is needed or present! Plus the midwives have other business to attend to at times.<br>
Anyway, I could go on and on about this...<br>
If you choose to do homebirth for free, that's wonderful ( although, your free services might be more well used at hospitals if you have them to give).<br>
But to suggest that there is no work for a doula at a homebirth is absurd. If that is the case for you, you probably shouldn't charge!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,663 Posts
Discussion Starter #47
Wow, that was nasty.<br><br>
I never said that I ever said there wasn't any work to be done at a homebirth.<br><br>
I was going to respond further, but I am not now, as you are just being mean to me and you don't know a thing about me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,522 Posts
absolutely yes yes yes.<br>
I would rather attend women at home than at a hospital and YES my time is worth something no matter where...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,490 Posts
we were originally going to have a doula, and birth in the hospital. Our hospital worked with the March of Dimes program and offered free doula services to patients.<br>
I thought that was great. They paired us with a doula in training. After meeting with her, we admitted we were also considering UC. She actually asked us if we were planning UC because of our feelings towards the hospital birth scene. (sorry...ot)<br>
Anyway, it was nice that her services were free, but a doula deserves to be paid, just like any professional. If she chooses to be free- more power to her. Perhaps some doulas need to bank their hours for certification. I havea massage friend who needed hours to become certified and of course he couldn't charge.<br>
I hope that those doulas who choose not to charge do not get taken advantage of. kwim?<br>
Its a lot of work to comfort a laboring mama, I am sure!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
I will do any birth on a sliding scale and even as a volunteer and the one homebirth I did was free for a friend. However, I need to make $ and homebirths can take as much time (and in my limited experience - as much work) as a hospital birth.<br>
Yes, it is an honor to be at a homebirth and if I had the money I would even pay to go to them but the fact is that I became a doula to do what I love to do and make money doing it (otherwise I have to waitress more) So not only am I doing the family a service but I am doing my own family a service by not having to work my other "job" so much cause I am making money doing what I love.<br><br>
doula, but most importantly wife & mama to 2 boys age - 4 and 6 both born at home and both born on Jan. 19th <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,325 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>darsmama</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Midwives, Doulas, Childbirth educators - You all deserve to be paid SO MUCH more then you earn. But IMNSHO, even if the currency you recieved for your hard work was dirt - Your value in society has not been comprimised, you are still just as special, worthy, & needed. How much you are paid dosen't validate your profession any more then being a size 2 makes you a healthy eater, or driving a hummer makes you a better person then the person in the Geo...<br><br>
Hoping I didn't piss anyone off<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"><br>
Katie</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
First.. you didn't piss me off. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"><br>
But i just wanted to say.. the money I'm paid for the healing I do doesn't validate me or my profession. It pays my mortage, my car payment (which is a used wagon) and puts food on my table. (oh, and it pays the horrendous student loans).... I don't want to make more money to be a better person, I want to make more money, to live a better life (debt free, vacation occasionally, have retirement) .<br><br>
I think most midwives and doulas are in the same position. I'd work for free causeI love what i do, but if I work for free, how will I eat? where will I live? I do see a number of low fee or free patients.. but if that's all I do... well then I'm in a heap of trouble. Loveing what you do, and deserving a living wage are pretty separate ideas. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"><br><br>
Thanks for bringing it up tho. Now.. i'm off to spend some of my small, but hard earned money on yarn. (on my day off!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
I am in total agreement with Chiromama... I don't need to be paid to validate me as a care provider or person... only to feed my family. I'm fortuate that I can make a living by doing something I enjoy. Part of what makes someone good at their job is their love for it. If I didn't love assisting birthing women the mothers would suffer for it. I'm good at what I do because I have the knowledge, experience, & the passion for it. If I didn't get paid for my job as a midwife or doula I wouldn't be able to do either one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,984 Posts
I was responding to a comment that when I went to go quote was by my own midwife. Oopsies... Guess I should pay more attention to names sometimes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,440 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>DoulaSarah</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br><br><br>
I told her the reason that I didn't think (as a birthing mother, which is how I was talking to her, NOT as a doula) that "I" thought it wasn't worth 600 dollars to hire a doula to be in at a homebirth where you are not doing the same thing as you would do at a hospital, which is absolutely true in my opinion. This came FROM MY EXPERIENCE<br><br>
I DO think that there is a difference between attending home and hospital.<br><br>
We are no longer protectors and walking birth plans,<br><br><br>
Ok, please let me know what you think...</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
These are the comments my pp was based on. I'm sorry if I came off as mean, that was definately not my intent. (that's one of the downfalls of writing, it's difficult for me to get the right tone across.)<br>
I think what strikes me most is the "we are no longer protectors and walking birth plans" part. Reason being is that that is NOT IMO what a doula is. Honestly if anyone were to ask me for a list of what I do,neither of those things would be on it. Location has nothing to do with anything. Every birth is different no matter where it happens. I've had hospital births where I barely felt as if I was needed, and homebirths that were really intense and long and difficult, and I worked my butt off.<br>
I do think many homebirthing mom's don't bother with a doula because they feel thier midwife is enough for them ( I definatly get more hospital birthers than homebirthers). But to me to suggest that we do less just because we are in a home is ridiculous...it's not even about the money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,663 Posts
Discussion Starter #55
I understand where you are coming from. Thank you for explaining it better for me!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
OK, so here is a very different opinion on something I am somewhat unfamiliar with.... I think if you do a service you should be paid... First & foremost.<br><br>
My dh is a chiropractor (as is mother, sister, BIL, SIL, father, step father, etc) It seems as though when you discount fees (or offer free services) for some reason, the appreciation factor is less... I am not sure why. Dh discounts his fees often (& his fees are extremely low to begin with). When he does, those tend to be the patients who call on our day off because they were unable to make it during office hours... Know what I mean?<br><br>
I think doulas are very loving people who give time & energy no matter where they attend the mother. I would be uncomfortable not paying someone for their work... (Dh trades with our massage therapist & I feel very uncomfortable asking her to work on me as part of the agreement even though she is great with it!)<br><br>
Was the person you were talking to about paying her doula looking for a way out of paying her? It wasn't very nice of her to put you in the middle. I am happy the doula was able to talk to you about it.<br><br>
I hope you work this out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,440 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>DoulaSarah</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I understand where you are coming from. Thank you for explaining it better for me!!</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Oh good! I felt really bad, because when I re-read my post I was like...wow, that does sound really mean! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/guilty.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="guilty"><br>
It was only 5:15am (not 7, as the post says, I think my settings are off).<br>
Anyway, again, sorry about that! Meaness is not my style! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,444 Posts
I'm a doula who works for a hospiotal. I also take private clients (of which I've had relatively few). I'll be attening my first homebirths in a few weeks. I will not be paid for them. This is because I volunteered to do it though. I've been a doula in one capacity or another for a long time. I am now working for certification. Although I know what I'm doing and they are trusting that I do, while doing these births, I wish to not be paid. Eventually, I will work for pay, though minimal. My family and I aren't in it for the money. It's satisfying work. Often long hours away from DH and kids. They love what I do and appreciate the time I put into it. My DH and his family are incredibly proud of me for doing what I do. The hospital at which I doula pays me (barely!). Again, it's not about the money. My service is free for hospital clients. (who said thye don't like the term "clients"? I grapple with it...I don't like it either but I odn't know any other term) Sometimes I wonder if, because I am free to them, I get shafted more often. It's much harder for me to get in touch with my hospital clients (some, not all) than others. I never am sure whether they apprciate me more or less, as someone mentioned regarding free/low-cost doulas.<br>
I'm working on doulaing for teens and low-income. I'll be doing this very low-cost or free. My family understands and supports. Should we need me to do it fo more, I'll take more "able to pay" clientele. for now though, I do it because I love birth, I love to see a woman reach the pennacle of motherhood. It's an absolute honor for me to be there to witness and to participate.<br><br>
TO the original question though, yes, I think a doula should be paid wherever she is. HB is work too. Often midwives don't arrive until a baby is crowning but a doula has been there hours. The midwife who arrives only to catch is paid, why shouldn't the doula? If a doula wishes to be paid, she will be a doula-for-hire. It's that simple to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,163 Posts
I have a perspective on it that I don't think has really been expressed yet. I'm not sure how well I'll be able to explain it, but I'll do my best.<br><br>
Money changes things. A professional service that is financially compensated is different in certain ways from a volunteer service. It has a different vibe, if you will. To <i>me,</i> the exchange of money takes way from the sacredness of it. Although for me the point is actually kind of moot because ideally I would only invite people to my birth that I was deeply emotionally involved with and who had as much stake in the birth experience as I, and such a person wouldn't expect payment anyway.<br><br>
At the same time, I realize the need in our current society for professional birth attendants, and for people to be able to protect their own families' interests (in terms of material support) by putting a price on the time and services they give to others. Which is totally valid. If someone feels as I do about the conflict between the financial and the sacred, but if they still feel the need for a professional birth attendant, I really don't know that there is an answer, other than to compromise one thing or the other.<br><br>
OT: mommyto2 wrote: <i>"My dh is a chiropractor (as is mother, sister, BIL, SIL, father, step father, etc) It seems as though when you discount fees (or offer free services) for some reason, the appreciation factor is less... I am not sure why."</i><br><br>
This is interesting, because my husband has had a different experience, albeit in a slightly different scenario. He works for a government-funded public service organization providing free services to low-income people. He used to do similar work, only in the private sector for paying clients. He says the differences in appreciation level make him never want to go back to paying clients, who would often treat him as a lowly laborer, watch over him closely to make sure it was being done right or that they weren't being taken advantage of, and would act annoyed in general about having to part with their precious money, making for an overall stressful vibe. In contrast, when people who need these services very badly literally can't afford to pay for them, they usually behave very differently when they receive them, the vibe being one of good-will and appreciation for his work (and he does work hard, and conscientiously.) He's always coming home with gifts from these people, handmade things or food they've grown or cooked. He loves it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>blueviolet</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have a perspective on it that I don't think has really been expressed yet. I'm not sure how well I'll be able to explain it, but I'll do my best.<br><br>
Money changes things. A professional service that is financially compensated is different in certain ways from a volunteer service. It has a different vibe, if you will. To <i>me,</i> the exchange of money takes way from the sacredness of it. Although for me the point is actually kind of moot because ideally I would only invite people to my birth that I was deeply emotionally involved with and who had as much stake in the birth experience as I, and such a person wouldn't expect payment anyway.<br><br>
At the same time, I realize the need in our current society for professional birth attendants, and for people to be able to protect their own families' interests (in terms of material support) by putting a price on the time and services they give to others. Which is totally valid. If someone feels as I do about the conflict between the financial and the sacred, but if they still feel the need for a professional birth attendant, I really don't know that there is an answer, other than to compromise one thing or the other.<br><br>
OT: mommyto2 wrote: <i>"My dh is a chiropractor (as is mother, sister, BIL, SIL, father, step father, etc) It seems as though when you discount fees (or offer free services) for some reason, the appreciation factor is less... I am not sure why."</i><br><br>
This is interesting, because my husband has had a different experience, albeit in a slightly different scenario. He works for a government-funded public service organization providing free services to low-income people. He used to do similar work, only in the private sector for paying clients. He says the differences in appreciation level make him never want to go back to paying clients, who would often treat him as a lowly laborer, watch over him closely to make sure it was being done right or that they weren't being taken advantage of, and would act annoyed in general about having to part with their precious money, making for an overall stressful vibe. In contrast, when people who need these services very badly literally can't afford to pay for them, they usually behave very differently when they receive them, the vibe being one of good-will and appreciation for his work (and he does work hard, and conscientiously.) He's always coming home with gifts from these people, handmade things or food they've grown or cooked. He loves it.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<br>
Well said! I think in the perfect world we would all provide birthing services to our fellow sisters because we are WOMEN too. For free, for the joy, for the safety and the support. Has patriarchal society changed this?
 
41 - 60 of 65 Posts
Top