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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone pump for their LOs during a birth? How do you make it work out time-wise? Make sure the partner is OK with mother for a few minutes? Anyone have their DH bring your baby to the hospital and nurse there?<br><br>
I've tentatively said yes to 3 births over December and January. My twins still nurse every 2 - 3 hours day and night. They'd be almost 17mo by then. I'm teaching them to use sippy cups with water and hoping to stretch out their nighttime nursing just a bit. I haven't pumped in almost 3 years though I know with my huge twins and a toddler supply I won't have any problem getting enough for 24 hr or so for them.<br><br>
Ideas?
 

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My son was 15 months when I went to my first birth. I was with her for almost 24 hours, and I managed to pump twice during that time (by the second pumping I was VERY engorged, but I didn't actually notice it until I stopped to pump).<br><br>
As you said, I waited for opportunities where I knew mom and dad were fine together. The first time they were in the shower, the second time, resting.<br><br>
It was easy to find a room to pump in while we were at their home, harder while at the hospital. I usually asked a nurse if there was an empty patient room I could use, and this has worked for several births.<br><br>
The most difficult part was washing the bottles. I wish I'd just brought a stash of clean, empty bottles so I didn't have to worry about that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OK, so I will definitely need to remember extra supplies. Good thing the birthing rooms have fridges.<br><br>
Oh and I wanted to mention that I've told all prospective clients that for now they need to know when they hire me that I WILL need a chance to pump and my DH will most likely bring my babies to nurse which takes 10 minutes. None of them have cared about that as they know breastfeeding is important. And considering there are only 3 doulas (that I know of) in a city of 15 million.... can't be too picky with who the doula is!
 

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I have had to pump before. My lo was 7 months old and I spent 24 hours with a couple and 42 hours... so pumping was NEEDED<lol!!<br>
I made sure mom was ok, and that dad was in the room. Then I went into another room, or the closet in the room and pumped. I quickly ran out of bags, (as never thought I would be at the one for 42 hours!!) And the nursing staff was wonderful in getting me supplies. I forget what I did with my milk. I must have brought a cooler and ice packs with me.
 

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My nursling is 16 months, and I attended my first birth as a doula a week before he turned one. It's gotten easier as time's gone on. He still nurses every few hours, but somehow my body does better with longer stretches now.<br><br>
The hard part is that between going somewhere to pump, setting it up, and pumping until my breasts are empty or nearly empty, can take 30+ minutes.<br><br>
I get engorged after 5-6 hours. I wait until I can't stand it any longer. LOL I've pumped at three of the seven births I've attended. The other four I just waited. I once waited 16 hours to pump at a birth, just hand expressing a few times in the bathroom sink.<br><br>
One birth a few months ago, I had to pump twice. It was about 20 hours. She had her mom and her husband for support, so it was pretty easy for all of us to rotate taking short breaks.<br><br>
Both of the hospitals where I attend births have designated pumping areas for the nurses. I've been given permission at both hospitals to use those areas. I also pumped once right in the room with a client, but my relationship with them was a little different.<br>
I don't save the milk, which seems silly... but I don't pump except at births and I have a feeling I'd have milk sitting in a bag somewhere and forget about it.<br><br>
We only have one family car, so bringing him to the hospitals isn't an option. Even if it were, I think I might have a hard time with seeing him and having to leave him again. It's hard for me to even call home and hear them in the background. It's a long time to be away! Also I get a little nervous about hospital germs and bringing my kids there.<br><br>
My clients always respect that I need to pump, and I usually mention it well in advance... no surprises here.<br><br>
Oh, and my one last piece of advice?? Bring the pump with you, don't leave it in the car. Even if you think it will be a quick one, bring it with you.
 

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If I am gone for a long time, sometimes I will slip into the bathroom and hand express into the sink if I need to. I never try actually bring a pump or storing and saving milk, just getting it out.
 

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I'm not a doula, but can I share what my doula did?<br><br>
Instead of pumping, she had her dh bring their ds to the hospital. She gave me plenty of advance warning, I knew exactly what was going on. My labor wasn't progressing much at that point and a nurse stayed with me while she was away. It didn't take long at all. I think it took her less time to nurse her ds than it would have to pump.
 

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I brought my hand pump (Medela Harmony) and didn't leave the mother's side. I would set the pump down and take a break during her contractions, then pick it up again between. Not the most efficient way of pumping, I know, but it got the milk out. I know labor is unpredictable, but just do your best to time it so you're not distracted during transition and double-peaking contractions. Or pushing.
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">Oh and I wanted to mention that I've told all prospective clients that for now they need to know when they hire me that I WILL need a chance to pump and my DH will most likely bring my babies to nurse which takes 10 minutes. None of them have cared about that as they know breastfeeding is important.</div>
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All I will say about this is that many times people are okay with it in theory but when it actually comes down to it then things can change. I have had many situations where I tell clients something and then when it really comes true they are freaking out. For example once I took on a client who knew I was doing a training several weeks before her due date and she would get my back up. She still hired me and when she went into labor on that day she freaked out.<br><br>
Hopefully that won't happen in your case. I know I am in the same situation - I am also nursing and told my clients I have to pump. The only difference is that before they hire me I really emphasize this and don't just say it. I let them know that I will be pumping at least every four hours and then go into detail explaining the whole thing - giving examples of how we can transition dad into helping or when I might fit the pumping in, but I don't just mention it in passing.
 

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<div style="font-style:italic;">I brought my hand pump (Medela Harmony) and didn't leave the mother's side. I would set the pump down and take a break during her contractions, then pick it up again between. Not the most efficient way of pumping, I know, but it got the milk out. I know labor is unpredictable, but just do your best to time it so you're not distracted during transition and double-peaking contractions. Or pushing.</div>
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Did she have a partner with her? They were okay with you pumping in front of them? Not making a judgement just asking <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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I have done both depending on birth location, time, proximity, etc. Everything is dependent on what's happening at the time, but I most often pump instead of having baby brought to me. I have been nursing through most of my doula career and pumping has never been a problem. Some births I have gone to the car, others a location nearby, it all just depends on what mom is doing in labor. I always talk about it in prenatals, but don't spend alot of time on it. It's really not a huge deal and I don't want to make it seem as if it is.
 

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I'm a homebirth midwife (so a little different scenario), but here's what I did when I was pumping for babe #2. I started attending births when he was 6 months.<br><br>
I brought a little lunch-sack style cooler bag with my pump and bottles in it. My client's family doesn't need to see my bottles in their fridge as they go to snack. A little lunch sack is a bit more discrete, plus it keeps everything together... as people fumble through the fridge, and move everything around trying to get to something in the back. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
I used an Avent Isis hand-pump for births because it didn't require an outlet, and was silent. Of course, we always have two midwives at a birth, and we were in always in a house or birth center....so it was easier to sneak to the next room for 10 minutes, with the understanding that I could drop everything and run back if the other midwife called.<br><br>
But my most important tip? Get a carabiner clip for your keys, and CLIP your keys to the cooler in the fridge. You can't get far without your keys after the birth, and that way you never leave your pump or breastmilk in someone else's fridge. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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I pump when I am at births.<br><br>
Depending on the mothers comfort level around nursing I will either pump in the labor room with her (I'm so not shy) or step into the bathroom, leaving the door cracked so if mom/dad needs me, I am within earshot. This also allows me to keep an ear on how mom is handling labor emotionally, so I'm not missing anything when I come back.<br>
My 9 month is still 100% breastfed, so every 2 hours I need to be pumping. I do tell mom what I'm about to do, inform dad, asking if he needs to use the restroom or get a drink first so he doesn't leave her. I TRY not to leave mom during transition, especially if labor has been going quickly.<br><br>
At hospitals, every patient should have printed labels with their name and admission info. Every nurse I've worked with has been more than happy to label my milk (with clients name), and take it down to the NICU fridge. They don't let me use food storage fridges due to OSHA regulations. Everyone's been really good about it.<br><br>
when I interview new clients I ALWAYS mention I am a BF'er and occasionally during labor I will step away to pump. I've never not had a client hire me because of this.
 

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I've never pumped, but I've nursed my dd during births. a few births (5 now) I've had dd with me and let her nurse more-or-less on demand. All of them I had someone available (a friend, dp, a sitter) to be responsible for dd and keep her out of my hair at the important moments, but so far it's been fine. if she needed some boob, whoever was taking care of her checked in that all was fine, and brought her to me. One time I was even holding a mother in a supported dangle, while nursing dd in a sling <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br>
as long as the parents are fine with it, I don't see it as a problem.<br>
tbh, i believe that natural birth and nursing should be normalised to the point where this ceases to be an issue, but that's just me, and I admit; we're not quite there yet!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This is my first hospital birth in a long time. I wish I could still sling the twins to nurse but can you imagine slinging 40lb of baby on the front to nurse while doing labor support in the hospital? LOL<br><br>
Yeah I wish it were normal but it's not to most.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br>
yeah that would even <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">: me
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>BrooklynDoula</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12400081"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">If I am gone for a long time, sometimes I will slip into the bathroom and hand express into the sink if I need to. I never try actually bring a pump or storing and saving milk, just getting it out.</div>
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I've done this. I've also pumped. I went back to births when my son was VERY small (three months?) and I wouldn't suggest it. I had a birth go for a couple of days and it was very hard on me, breastfeeding wise.<br><br>
You just never know if a birth is going to take a few hours of if it's going to take three days. Next time I'll wait until I'm comfortable having my child eat some form of alternative food.
 
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