Mothering Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wondering what you all think about this.<br><br>
I really like that he says he's not in support of 'pushing babies around at night' before a year. But this sounds to me like crying it out. But I'm so tired I can't think straight either! Just wondering really if anyone has used this with a successful experience. I will *not* let my dd CIO. I don't believe in it ethically. At the same time I'd like to stay married. (Joking there). But I'm not myself anymore. I can hardly function after more than a year of not sleeping more than 4 hours a night.<br><br><a href="http://www.drjaygordon.com/development/ap/sleep.asp" target="_blank">http://www.drjaygordon.com/development/ap/sleep.asp</a><br><br>
Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
We tried his method one night when I had reached the end of my rope. It felt too much like CIO, so I just bought a new rope, KWIM? We may try the method again one day, but we just weren't ready for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
743 Posts
I'm not sure about this one. I've been wondering,<br><br>
Is breastfeeding your child whenever they ask the only AP way to night time parent? Is it really CIO if you do not?<br><br>
Because my son does cry, a lot, if you do not breastfeed him as soon as he asks in the middle of the night. Even if you are holding him. In fact, he usually arches his back and gets really angry and pushes you away.<br><br>
We have been contemplating this method, but have not been able to implement because it doesn't feel right to have him cry when I can prevent it by giving him a boob. But then, I'm not sure I am doing any of us any favors when I feel powerless to set any limits on nursing all night long. Thankfully, DS only woke up 2x last night, so I feel much more human today than usual. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
We've tried it twice now, but whenever we get to the 7th night and you're supposed to actually not nurse them back to sleep, I chicken out. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
I really like Dr. Jay Gordon, and from the way I read him, I think he would really prefer that moms continue to nurse their toddlers through the night when they need it, but he offers this "program" for those who are at the end of their rope. My ds is 17 months now and has NEVER slept through the night (has only slept 6 hours straight ONCE when he was 9 wks old), and often nurses every hour throughout the night. It's hard, and I particularly remember having a sort of panic attack right after his first birthday where I realized and said loudly, "I haven't slept in over a year...do you understand what I'm saying...I haven't slept in over a year!" But it seems since then I've settled back into our old routine and am dealing with it one day at a time.<br><br>
We will try the program again when I think we are really ready to follow through. I do think that there is a difference between CIO in a crib in another room, and crying in your bed, in your arms, and helping your toddler break a pattern so that the whole family can sleep better and function better during the day.<br><br>
Anyone else have actual success with this program?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,677 Posts
I tried it a couple times when DS was about a year and a half old, but it felt too soon. However, I retained the concepts and very quickly and gently nightweaned in January at 2y3mo following DS lead of occasionally sleeping through.<br><br>
This doesn't feel like CIO to me. DS did a little crying, but it was short because #1 he stopped quickly and went to sleep or #2 I could quickly tell if he needed more Mama love and nursed him.<br><br>
I think the most helpful revelation to me was that he doesn't always need a nipple to get back to sleep. In the beginning I would rub his back and shhh, or nurse a little and pop him off. I could easily tell if his unhappiness would be short lived or if he really needed to nurse.<br><br>
Now, this past weekend we were out of town AND he got sick. I definitely nursed him when he woke up crying. Last night, I woke up with him nursing, but detached him and he protested for a few moments and went back to sleep.<br><br>
This will be a short break from night nursing for me... #2 is expected in July <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> but it's a great time for a little break.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top