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I was wondering if anyone else has experienced with their child. H (almost five, in second year of preschool) loves the social aspect of being at school as he is very gregarious, but he complains about "doing the same thing over and over" (e.g., the same kind of painting, etc). I know that the idea of these comforting routines is integral to Waldorf, but I guess it doesn't work this way for all kids. He is only in two mornings a week, but still . . . I guess he's ready for something new. I'm planning to HS next year instead of Waldorf K.
 

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I think that's fairly common if he's just starting waldorf at that age. Some kids adjust (most?) and some kids it's just not a good fit for <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Is he new to Waldorf? I was surprised at the amount of "I'm boreds" that were heard from Dc's classmates this year. It's just a concept I could not even grasp, but there were so *many* children new to Waldorf in his class that came from other educational backgrounds.<br><br>
I think that in other schools their activities are often directed, add to that possible media-influence and the Waldof day would seem rather uneventful to some children, I would imagine. From what I understand the "I'm Boreds," have long since disappeared.<br><br>
Also, I'm sure the decision was made for good reasons, but it could also be b/c your Dc is in Nursery instead of Kindergarten at that age. Have you spoken to the teacher?
 

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When I began to babysit a four year old here it took a lot of time to transition her to the way things were done here. I really needed to work with her to help her to play and use her imagination which is a lot of the work of the younger years. It might be helpful to speak to the teacher though about what they are doing...even though there is repetition there should also be different stories, colors, lots of nature play, walks each day, etc. hth
 

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Yes. My son is 4.5 and in Waldorf preschool. I mentioned this in another thread .. I sooo wanted Waldorf to be perfect for him, but it's not. He learns the oral story in a few days and is bored stiff the rest of the month when they tell it. He's very verbal and is already sight reading words on his own, he's begging me to help him read. He enjoys all the outdoor play at Waldorf, but is also ready for more structure.<br><br>
So I'm sending him to a classical summer school, and I think I may send him there in the fall as well. It's going to be a big change, but no matter how much I love the beauty of Waldorf, I don't think it's the right fit for such an active learner.
 

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Hahah... yep... I put my oldest in a Waldorf preschool at age 4 and he found many aspects of it to be dull. He enjoyed it socially, but didn't enjoy the painting, and was anxious to learn to read and perplexed when the teacher discouraged it. The teacher didn't know what to do with his "boy energy," found him too gregarious for her liking, and found subtle and not-so-subtle ways to express her disapproval of him. I took him out after a semester and put him in a community center preschool, which he loved.<br><br>
I love Waldorf. I really, really wanted James to love Waldorf. As another parent said, it just wasn't a good fit. It's supposed to be able to incorporate every child, but I think that does depend on the teacher and how he or she applies the principles. I would have put my other kids in, even after James' experience, but we'd moved too far away by then.<br><br>
Mind you, this child who was the bane of his Waldorf teacher's existence has grown into a voracious reader who loves to disassemble broken electronics and perform stand-up comedy for his class during school parties. The things that were problems for his teacher-- that he was too exuberant, too reading-focused, too likely to disassemble her classroom-- have turned into passions and strengths for him. I think you just have to put your kid where he'll thrive, wherever that may be. I wish it had been Waldorf for James, but it wasn't, and he's pretty darn cool anyway <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
-Rebecca
 

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I personally don't think waldorf is for every child, and I really, really like waldorf education. Also, I've known at least two seriously anthroposophical families who realized that one of their children was not suited by waldorf and took the kid out. One child went back after a few years, the school turned out to be a good fit from 5th grade on. The other child had left in HS and that, was that.<br><br>
People are pretty varied and I can't imagine any form of education that would be ideal for every child, can you?
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/truedat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Truedat"><br><br>
I would have to agree with Deborah a 100%! Not any specific school works for every child. My sister was removed from the same school I went to by my parents because her teacher was (can I say this?)... an idiot.<br>
My teacher was very good, a very nice and kind hearted person who treated everybody equally in class and still made enough time to make sure every single student was well cared for.<br>
These are our 1st -8th grade teachers I am talking about now, later we did have some other good ones and also one or two bad ones, just like everywhere else.<br>
Maggie
 
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