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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 5 yo ds had his second session of speech therapy today. He has some articulation problems although people understand him for the most part. My dh's plan has some coverage for therapy, but not enough to get us through the long haul. Anyway, at today's session, the speech therapist went over some flashcards that focussed on the articulation sound (the letter "w") and then played a game of memory with ds. That was it. On the drive home, I thought, "That wasn't anything I couldn't myself at home." It would save me the trouble of getting three kids out the door (not the mention the trouble of dropping the other two at my mom's). The cards are available for purchase online. Very tempting. But should I take something so important (speech articulation problems) into my own hands?<br><br>
Any suggestions for activities we could at home???<br><br>
Thanks.
 

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My son had speech therapy at that age through the public school he was attending and it was all free. We worked with him as well. I think in our case, he loved going to speech and was definitely more willing to do the things she asked of him than what we tried.<br><br>
So, I do think it's helpful but I also think you could get the therapy for free.
 

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Yes, I would suggest trying the public school system. Is your son currently enrolled in public school? If so, you start the ball rolling by requesting an evaluation. You can provide the district with any information you have from your private therapist and they are required to consider it. If he's going to private school or home schooled, the public schools' obligations vary by which state you are in. If he's not yet school age in your district, he is still eligible for services under federa law (because he's over the age of 3).<br><br>
You can also ask your ST for suggestions of things to do together at home and you could also ask her if you can go longer between sessions to stretch out your insurance money while implementing her suggestions at home.<br><br>
Catherine
 

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I think yes you can do it at home. Also i recently read that most speech problems fix themselves by age 7.<br>
So i think guiding him at home will be helpful;. My DS pronounces the hard C like a T so we work on lifting the middle of his tongue instead of using the front. there is no set time we do it just now and then we'll say, "look Michael like this" then we do it until he says he's had enough.<br>
As long as there aren't any outside issues (tongue tied or some kid of trauma) I think yes you can work comfortably at home.
 

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Our therapy is free through the school system. I think any child can get speech therapy, and ours comes to our house. We do practice words a lot at home- making up rhymes and repeating words which she has problems with.
 

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I just thought I'd add that I would also try to take that evaluation from teh private therapy place to the school district and use it to say, "Look. My child needs an evaluation/services," because it can sometimes be difficult to get much help from the school system. It is possible though, and definitely what I would try. He most likely won't see a therapist as often as he can privately, but then if you work with him at home too, you should be good to go!
 

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You should also talk to your current therapist about what the diagnosis is for your son and what his/her plan for therapy with your son is. It doesn't sound like they've communicated that very well to you. I agree that taking that info to the schools is crucial for getting help for him there.<br><br>
In addition, they should be talking with you/giving you things to do at home. The best approach is to have the parents and the therapist work as a team. There is more to speech therapy than just using flashcards -- there needs to be an assessment as to what sounds (or sound combinations) are delayed/missing. You need to know the typical developmental trajectory for these sounds so that you which ones to focus on early and which ones to put off until later. There should be periodic reassessment to see if he's making progress. The therapy should work from getting him to make the sounds to getting him to use the sounds in words to getting him to use the sounds with words in sentences (each step adds a level of complexity).<br><br>
So, the therapist has the knowledge to set this kind of plan in motion, but then should work with you to implement it.
 

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I agree with LynnS6. Ds (almost 3) is in speech therapy and has for a little more than a year. Everything his SLP (speech language pathologist) does with him, she gives me some ideas on how to implement those things everyday in our house.<br><br>
What sounds is he missing? I've asked our SLP about my older child (newly 5) not making some sounds yet and she said it was perfectly normal until around 7. There are a couple of sound combinations that it's normal to not have until about 9.
 

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What Lynn said. DS has had speech therapy weekly since July. We do pretty much the same thing at home for much shorter bursts but 2-3 times a day. We've also started to integrate it into everything we do as long as DS's mood can tolerate it. The upshot is that he's making progress at ~2x the pace we were told to expect.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>pbjmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14745964"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Another vote for free service through you school district. They will do the eval, service, everything.</div>
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But the school district (at least ours) won't provide service unless the child has some certain amount of delay. All 3 of my kids have had articulation issues but the district would not even consent to a formal speech evaluation on them, let alone any speech therapy.<br><br>
Of course, they did give me tips to help my two oldest. So it couldn't hurt to talk to them. But unless your son is having language issues, not just articulation issues, I doubt he will get any therapy.<br><br>
Do you have any colleges with speech pathology programs near you? My youngest gets speech therapy at the college and it's all free.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>lindberg99</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14750257"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">But the school district (at least ours) won't provide service unless the child has some certain amount of delay. All 3 of my kids have had articulation issues but the district would not even consent to a formal speech evaluation on them, let alone any speech therapy.<br></div>
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Then your district violated federal law. Under IDEA, public school districts in the US are REQUIRED to do evaluations upon written request from parents.<br><br>
Catherine<br><br>
ETA: Here's a link to a sample request: <a href="http://www.studentadvocacycenter.org/sampleletters/special_ed_eval_request.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.studentadvocacycenter.org..._request.shtml</a>
 

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The money we've spent in speech therapy has been absolutely worth it (and we've spent thousands). Our speech therapist got my son to make sounds that I just couldn't get him to make. Totally, totally worth every penny. As my dh said, we bought the gift of speech.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>crl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14750332"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Then your district violated federal law. Under IDEA, public school districts in the US are REQUIRED to do evaluations upon written request from parents.<br><br>
Catherine<br><br>
ETA: Here's a link to a sample request: <a href="http://www.studentadvocacycenter.org/sampleletters/special_ed_eval_request.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.studentadvocacycenter.org..._request.shtml</a></div>
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OK, I think I phrased that wrong. The preschool would not do one for my youngest because he was receiving in-class interventions. He was a "peer model" at the early intervention preschool.<br><br>
For my older two, they said they could do one but the chance that they would qualify for services was essentially zero so the ST didn't see much point in doing one for either of the kids.
 

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I too would suggest calling the local public school and asking who to speak to about it.<br><br>
My DS started therapy through the state at 20 months. He had a delay. At 3 he was handed over to the school system which put him into preschool for free 2 mornings a week in the morning. He LOVES it. He is 4 now and doing very well and goes 3 mornings a week. There is a speech therapist in the room most of the time. Periodically I get suggestions for things to do at home. All his therapy has been paid for.<br><br>
My older DS had was evaluated at 5 for articulation. I did not think he needed the evaluation but my DH thought he did. But I spent a lot more time watching and listening to groups of kids. So to me DS sounded normal. The therapist agreed with me. She said the issues DS had were within normal for the age range. That if they continued into 2nd grade he would then get help.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>lindberg99</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14750257"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">But unless your son is having language issues, not just articulation issues, I doubt he will get any therapy.</div>
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I read your other post too. I think this varies alot. Some of it is differences in state laws. Some of it is how much you push for it, knowing the right phrases to use, etc. My ds is in speech for articulation at 3, he scored 89% for language.<br><br>
OP, as stated, the state is required to do an evaluation if you ask for one. Even if you get the eval and he doesn't qualify they will give you good ideas on how to work with him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
My computer has been disconnected for about 10 days now (doing basement renos), but I wanted to express a sincere thanks to all who responded.<br><br>
My son will get speech therapy through the school he's attending, but he's on a waiting list and they say it will probably be another 1-2 years before they get around to him (through the school system). Anyway, since my original post, we have attended another session and the therapist did basically the same kind of activities, but this time she has some "homework" for us to do in between sessions which we are finding very helpful. We will see how it goes. I have actually seen some improvement in my son's speech in only a few sessions, so the speech therapist is doing something right.<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Mamasjoy</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14791916"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My son will get speech therapy through the school he's attending, but he's on a waiting list and they say it will probably be another 1-2 years before they get around to him (through the school system).</div>
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I'm glad it is working out. I would like to point out that if your son qualifies for therapy through the district and they don't provide it I think they are breaking the law. You may want to check the laws in your state. You could save a boatload of money on therapy.
 
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