Mothering Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
538 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a six year old who for at least two years has had pubic hair. Our last pediatrician felt that she should have a blood test and have some x-rays done. I am not against this, and am more than happy to let our current pediatrician have this done. I would like to know beforehand if we are going to have any major problems. This pediatrician has seemed to be invasive in during the other times I have seen him with my children (saying he would give me disposable diapers if I couldn't afford them, chastising me for not vaccinating my children against chicken pox before my now six year old got it just a week ago). He seems intollerant of me using my intuition and my knowledge of vaccines. While I can appreciate his concern, I got rather upset when he told me that I may have DCFS coming to my door. I have nothing to hide! I even have a background check done through my state when I was working for a daycare. My question is, being a military family, what can I do to prevent this from getting out of hand? Am I able to say enough is enough when and if I feel that things have gone too far. How do I find my legal rights. I don't want dh to get in trouble with the Coast Guard and/or his command, but I do want the best for our children..even if that means not taking action when they want us to.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,789 Posts
I think you have a few major concerns.<br><br>
1) *What* is the best treatment for your daughter who is going through early puberty.<br><br>
2) Is your doctors current response appropriate.<br><br>
3) How does this apply in the military context.<br><br>
I'm not actually knowledgable about this, but have posted a link into the Military Mommas thread (where I know you have been before) to hopefully get you some help with #3.<br><br>
Here is a fairly lengthy explanation of Precoious Puberty:<br><br><a href="http://www.emedicine.com/ped/topic1882.htm" target="_blank">http://www.emedicine.com/ped/topic1882.htm</a><br><br>
I thought you may find the following interesting given your specific situation (early pubic hair):<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Premature thelarche and premature pubarche, much more common conditions than true precocious puberty, are 2 benign normal variant conditions that can look like precocious puberty but are nonprogressive or very slowly progressive. Premature thelarche refers to the isolated appearance of breast development, usually in girls younger than age 3 years; <b>premature pubarche refers to appearance of pubic hair without other signs of puberty in girls or boys younger than age 7-8 years</b>. A thorough history, physical examination, and growth curve review can help distinguish these normal variants from true sexual precocity.</td>
</tr></table></div>
So, apparently before a diagnosis of "true" Precoious Puberty your daughter should first just do a physical exam & growth curve review (which should be fairly easy, definately non-invasive).<br><br>
This site has a much shorter explanation:<br><br><a href="http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/health/info/endocrine/diagnose/precocious.htm" target="_blank">http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/h...precocious.htm</a><br><br>
And a much more straightforward recommendation for diagnosis (I have condensed):<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">How is precocious puberty diagnosed?<br><br>
x-ray<br><br>
measurement of gonadotropins (LH and FSH), estradiol, testosterone and / or thyroid hormones<br><br><br>
ultrasound of the adrenal glands and gonads (ovaries and testes)<br><br>
gonadotropin-stimulating hormone (GnRH) stimulation test to determine the form of precocious puberty (gonadotropin-dependent or gonadotropin-independent)<br><br><br>
magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)</td>
</tr></table></div>
Regarding your doctor. I personally would not see him ever again, but I do not know your situation re: military care. Is it possible, though, to get a referal to an Endocrinologist? It sounds like this has been a concern for a couple of years and earlier treatment is generally better.<br><br>
I hope you get some good advice and GOOD LUCK!<br><br>
Kay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,491 Posts
wow- I didn't know early puberty waws considered a medical problem. I hate pubic hair around 6 or 7 and started my period at 8 1/2. I have not experienced any problems from this other than being shorter than I would have been had the estrogen not have kicked in (which I am glad for since I am 5'4 and the Dr.s were projecting 5'10 for me since I was already 5'3 in 3rd grade). One piece of advice- I don't know if your daughter goes to school or not but since no one else at my elementary school had their periods my mom had to ask the principal to install pad recepticles in the bathroom stalls. And my mom talked to my teachers so that they wouldn't laugh in my face when I said I had to go home due to cramps.<br>
I did have to be on the pill for about 6 months since my cycle was so frequent (bleeding for 7 days then nothing for 10 days then bleeding for 5 days, etc). But now I am fine and happy expecting my first child!<br>
I did go through depression for a little while because I was so much more emotionally and mentally mature than my peers (I am a psychology student and have studied the various hormonal changes and how they affect the brain- it is theorized that the hormone cascade of puberty develops the child mind into the mature adult mind capable of abstract reasoning- which I did develop way before my peers- it was helpful that my parents did not treat me like the typical 8 year old or age I was)<br>
I did have experience my sexuality emerging earlier than my peers- which made me feel uncomfortable since 12 year olds having sex is "unthinkable"- but it is only natural for sexual feelings to accompany puberty- this does not mean I had sex that early but "waiting until marriage" and things like that seemed ridiculous to me since I had been having sexual urges since I was 9 or 10 and people don't marry nowdays till their mid 20's!<br>
It definately made me different- but not in a bad way- even to this day my peers sort of "look up" to me- I am a junior in college and my classmates always think I am a graduate student taking some classes for fun!<br>
Don't worry- your daughter is just ahead of the curve!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,789 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I didn't know early puberty waws considered a medical problem.</td>
</tr></table></div>
One purely physical problem that comes to mind is increased cancer risk due to increased estrogen exposure. There are possible consequences to early puberty and, IMO, each parent needs to weigh them against the possible consequences of hormone therapy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,997 Posts
Well I'm not sure If the Coast Guard uses the same system as the Army but we have Tricare and there are several levels of it. With Tricare Prime, you are stuck going to a military doctors which are hit or miss but you basically never pay a cent. But there's other levels (I want to say it's called Tricare Plus) where you can choose to go to a civilian doctor however you do have to deal with copays but if you're really unhappy with the military doc near you then it may be worth it.<br>
I'd definitely say to check in with the Military mommies thread - I'd bet at least a few of them have gotten disgusted with military docs and switch to the plan with the optional of civilian care and would be happy to give you plenty of info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,903 Posts
If you are on TriCare Prime, you should drop down to Standard so that you can see a civilian doctor. Military doctors are <b>such</b> a gamble, and if he is threatening to get CPS involved (on what grounds, I don't know) then you need to take her to another doctor immediately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
538 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I am going to get the blood tests etc. I did read that she has a higher rate of cancer. I have cancer in my family and so does dh. I don't know about the drugs, we will see. The good thing is that the Dr. who did all of this is not her regular Dr. and we will see a different one. There are several Peds at this particular dept. They will refer me out. My other daughter is small for her age (22.5 lbs at 2.5) and she needs to see an endocrinologist also. I can't change my Tricare in this area. I live too near a Military Treatment Facility. I'm not concerned about getting referrals or changing peds. It seems that Alaskan Military Treatment Facilities are very open to giving referrals. Thank you for all of your information. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,925 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>allisonrose</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Well I'm not sure If the Coast Guard uses the same system as the Army but we have Tricare and there are several levels of it. With Tricare Prime, you are stuck going to a military doctors which are hit or miss but you basically never pay a cent. But there's other levels (I want to say it's called Tricare Plus) where you can choose to go to a civilian doctor however you do have to deal with copays but if you're really unhappy with the military doc near you then it may be worth it.<br>
I'd definitely say to check in with the Military mommies thread - I'd bet at least a few of them have gotten disgusted with military docs and switch to the plan with the optional of civilian care and would be happy to give you plenty of info.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<br>
They changed the rules, you can see a civillian doctor now as long as they accept tricare prime, you can ask them to write out a script for the military pharmacy to avoid copays or you can have it filled at walgreens etc. and pay the $3 or $9.<br><br>
As for getting the blood work done I would since it's serious if left untreated.<br><br>
As far as vaxes goes, they can't do anything to your dh AFAIK for refusing them. We don't at all and my dh has never had problem and our doc hasn't given us much trouble other than strongly suggesting them and making sure I understood that my dd can catch things without them. Yes I'm aware of that!<br><br>
I don't know what would happen if you refused other recommended medical treatment because I never have but I don't think they can do much. Good luck!!!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top