Mothering Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been using sposies for a few days due to pinworms... I have been using Moltx which is made by ecobaby. I went on their site to see what they were about, because they are a lot more convenient, though pricey. They look pretty good. According to their site the diapers are unbleached no perfumes or chemicals or antioxidants and they are compostable.<br><br>
Does anyone know anything about these dipes??? Can all this be true?? Why should I cloth diaper if these are around (please convince me that all the $$ and hard work I have been putting in to cloth is worth it). DH is really pushing to use these and the truth is they are much more convenient and ds likes them. They are definately not as cute as cloth!!!!<br><br>
SOOO confused!!!!<br><br>
Dahlia<br><br>
here's the link to their site<a href="http://ecobaby.ie" target="_blank">moltex diapers</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
OK here's a reason not to use Moltex sposies.... DD sweats in them and got a rash by the top of the back of the diaper.<br>
I wonder if dh will think that's a good enough reason to use cloth???
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
I remember reading somewhere that you should NOT compost diapers because of the viruses found in baby stool - those found naturaly and those due to vaccinations. Also, what are these things made of? I can't find it anywhere on their site!?<br><br><a href="http://www.ecobaby.ie/ecobaby_home_01.htm" target="_blank">http://www.ecobaby.ie/ecobaby_home_01.htm</a><br><br>
Also, unless you send them specifically to a compost dump they will not actually compost. If you send them to the land fill, they'll just wind up sitting forever. Landfills are gross, air and water and sun don't get to all the junk in there so the stuff can't break down. But that's just what I've read...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,789 Posts
I'm sorry I don't have a link to this...<br><br>
but I have also read that diapers that say they are compostable, *are* but there are virtually no composting facilities like they need in the entire US. So, unless you just happen to have one that composts these kind of diapers, they are really just regular garbage. And, of course, you are still supposed to dump the poo in the toilet, which I find much yuckier w/ a disposable than cloth.<br><br>
Kay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,405 Posts
You can compost your own dipes if you don't have a local facility, it's just recommended that you only do the pee ones (worm compost is supposed to be great for it) I'm planning on getting some <a href="http://www.eenee.com/" target="_blank">WeeNee Pads</a> For the next baby, you can even rip them apart and flush them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
Well personally I don't think I will ever believe any type of disposables are better than cloth. If I had to use one they would be something like this but besides the environmental factor I am also in this to save money and I don't think I could save with this item.<br><br>
On their site on page 3 of this link:<br><br><a href="http://www.ecobaby.ie/ecobaby_home_01.htm" target="_blank">http://www.ecobaby.ie/ecobaby_home_01.htm</a><br><br>
It says they are made of:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">unbleached wood pulp, recycled plastic material<br><br>
Before disposables, mothers worked long and hard to keep their cloth nappies nice and white. They used chlorine bleaches and boiling water. The first disposable nappies contained unbleached wood pulp.<br><br>
When one manufacturer bleached the wood pulp to make a white nappy, all others had to bleach theirs too.<br><br>
Chlorine bleaching led to significant environmental damage. Greenpeace and others have forced changes in this area. However, many think that it is crazy to bleach disposable products at all.<br><br>
Most of the plastics in disposable nappies are<br><br>
Polyethylene, for the outer waterproof layer, and<br><br>
Polypropylene, for the inner liner.<br><br>
Since the disposable nappy is a single-use product, every effort must be made to reduce the environmental cost. Moltex make the Eco Nappy with a special polyethylene film which is very thin, and which contains recycled plastic. This reduces the amount of resources used to produce the nappy, and helps make the Eco Nappy the most eco friendly disposable baby nappy.<br></td>
</tr></table></div>
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top