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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My DS saw a pediatric neuro the other day. He has been doing this odd thing where his eyes roll up in head and he seems out of it for a few seconds. We had his vision tested and it was fine. She scheduled him for a EEG to rule out seizures. Any advice about what to expect? They said we need to wake him up at 5AM for a 10AM test so that he will sleep through it but I don't know how he is supposed to get to sleep. Do they give him something? Any advice from you experienced mamas is appeciated.
 

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*sighs*<br><br>
when we went for ours, we were met by a nice lady who proceeded to use super glue to attach the electrodes to rae's head. lots of them. she didn't understand what was going on, and she screamed through the whole application, crying from pure fear...even though it was a nice quiet room with a wonderful tech.<br><br>
she slept, pure and simple, because she was tired out. after they glued all the electrodes on, they handed her to me and i nursed her...she passed right out. we sat in the dark room for quite a while before she came back in and awakened rae.<br><br>
she then removed the electrodes by washing her hair with a "remover". when i remarked that it smelled like turpentine...she admitted that it was.<br><br><br><br>
wasn't the best experience for us, but it was worth it to rule out the seizures, as many in my family suffer from them and rae falls down a lot. my daughter was just a bit over two years.
 

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It's hard to know exactly the way it will be done because each hospital differs. For us they've used a cap each time and they put it on and then use a blunt tip to scratch in the middle of each electrode. They tried sedating my son but it didn't work so he was awake for most of it and screaming because he hated the cap, hated the scratching, etc.<br><br>
As far as being sleep deprived... They like to get a reading while they're both sleeping and awake so that's part of the reason and also it makes it easier if they're planning on sedating.<br><br>
I refused sedation the last time and told the tech I wanted to nurse ds and he was a bit more calm that way.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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My son has had 2 of them, one at 14 months and one at 26 months (or thereabouts).<br><br>
The one at 16 months was not too big of a deal. The morning was terrible because he was SOOO tired and cried a lot. We almost had to douse him with cold water to keep him awake in the car. But he handled the individual electrode application (ours didn't seem to be superglue/turpentine...;-}) well and then just nursed to sleep when they needed him to.<br><br>
The one he just had was difficult. Getting him up and keeping him occupied was much easier...my husband and I took turns doing exciting interactive things with him. But once we got there, he freaked out when she started to do the electrodes. He basically cried so hard he couldn't breathe...then once she was done, he couldn't calm down. Eventually she asked us to leave the room so he wouldn't think we were going to 'save' him. Boy did that go counter to everything I believe in parenting. My husband and I listened to him cry for almost 10 minutes and then he finally fell asleep. That was the hardest doctor's appt we've ever done. And I won't do another EEG if we don't absolutely have to.<br><br>
I don't want to scare you...because it isn't painful...but you will be dealing with an overly tired child who is submitting to a tedious process where he/she can't really move around much. Bring lots of your child's favorite things, juices, snacks, toys and make sure you have enough sleep. If you are exhausted and stressed, it will be harder on you to deal with your child being exhausted and stressed.<br><br><br>
Sally
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for your honest replies. It helps to know what I am in for. I always do better with full information. How I wish he were still nursing but he is not. We stopped at 15 months for my own medical reasons. Maybe I can break out a bottle. He hasn't seen one in about 4-5 months but maybe it will be comfort he needs.<br><br>
Thanks again
 

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With a short term EEG, at a clinic that specializes in pediatric neurology, it is very rare that they will glue the electrodes to the child's head. Short term protocol is to use a paste that washes out with shampoo. Long term protocol (overnight monitoring) is to use glue, because in long-term EEGs the paste allows the electrodes to move, and that can cause injuries and blisters. I'm so sorry loriforeman. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> That must have been awful.<br><br><br>
An EEG for a 20 month old should be easy (with the exception of the sleep deprivation part...that's hard on everybody! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"> ). You'll need to get your son as sleepy as possible at 10am, so wake up whenever you feel you need to to make that happen.<br><br>
When you go in the office you'll fill out some paperwork, then go to an EEG room where an EEG tech (NICE people usually) will measure your son's head, possibly use a wax pen to mark spots, and then the tech will paste little electrodes (they look like the ear units on Ipods) all over your son's head at regular intervals. He'll press on the electrodes until the computer says they're reading correctly (takes some fiddling, usually). Then he'll probably wrap your son's head in a gauze bandage so your son can't mess with the electrode locations. He might also put a heart sensor on your son's chest and two temple sensors on his face (for eye movement, I believe). Your son will have a big gauze-wrapped head with lots of electrode leads coming out of the top. Personally, I think the "snorkle" look is adorable. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love"><br><br>
Some kids hate getting the electrodes on, but they don't hurt. You can sing, read books, or do whatever you need to. Sometimes you'll have to help restrain the child slightly to make it possible for the correct electrode placement...usually you can do enough just with gentle holding and/or blanket wrapping.<br><br>
The test starts and each place does it a different way. There's a sleep stage, a waking stage, and awake stage, and often a visual stimuli (flashing lights) stage. You can be near your child, even holding your child, as long as you're careful not to bump, scrape, or rub the area with electrodes (even a slight bump will set the EEG reading off for several seconds). With that in mind, make sure to NOT TOUCH the electrodes IN ANY WAY if you see seizure activity or approaching seizure activity. Steady pressure on the electrodes is okay, but movement against them isn't.<br><br>
The EEG tech might stay in the room with you (probably will) and read the EEG while it's happening. You can probably dim the lights. You can bring music or musical toys from home--anything that helps sleep. They may even have nighttime music for you. You can nurse or bottle feed (usually). You can smile, sing, do gentle play, and touch. It's best if you can have your son stay in the hospital bed while it's happening, but I once held my son through an entire EEG (he was in a stage where he would only sleep in my arms at nap time).<br><br>
Ours usually last 30 to 45 minutes, but it's flexible depending on how long it takes to get your son to sleep.<br><br>
At the end, they unwrap the gauze, pull off the electrodes (no pain with paste), use a washcloth to get the wax marks and paste off, and send you home! Easy, really! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> You normally get results in a few days.<br><br>
PM me if you have any other questions. We've had several dozen EEGs in this family, so we've kinda seen it all. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
Good luck! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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Lily has had about, gosh, 8 or 9, I think? Each time, they did everything RedOakMama said, except they didn't do any stimuli or sleeping/waking thing except on her most recent she had she did the waking thing to try to bring about a seizure. Her most recent was the only one looking for seizure activity though, the others were just looking at brain waves to help determine the extent of damage. She never had gauze wrapped on them, but she'd never grab them anyway.
 
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