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Discussion Starter #1
I may be hoping for something that doesn't exist, but I figured you folks would know if anyone would. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
I am looking for books (or other suggestions) for my DD to satisfy her current interest in math. She is a very early/advanced reader (reads fluently up to at least a 4th grade level) but is only a bit ahead (?) in math (has great number sense and is able to do arithmetic in her head with the numbers 1-10, but has limited number sense past that point). As importantly, she is very self-directed and driven, and likes to learn independently. She isn't interested in workbooks. She doesn't need <i>practice</i>--once she gets something she's got it. She just needs explanations.<br><br>
I've found NO books at her level. Either they are far too simple (e.g., counting 1-10), or they are far too difficult (e.g., adding in the thousands). Typically they involve stories, but right now DD is interested in math for its own sake. I think she would really dig a book with number charts, or simple explanations, without a story or poems or characters to muck it up. Yes, I am thinking of something that doesn't exist, aren't I? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
Ideas?<br><br>
ETA: I am posting here because I think the PtGC folks have the most experience with asynchronous development, and also because I am writing about my gifted 4 year old. But I am open to moving the thread if there is a better place for it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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What about an actual math text book? Say for 1st or 2nd graders? We just looked online for my daughter's 3rd grade one, so we can keep going during the summer with her, and for my 6 year old that is interested. Would something like that fit the bill?
 

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Maybe <a href="http://www.keypress.com/x6252.xml" target="_blank">Miquon</a> or <a href="http://www.cimt.plymouth.ac.uk/projects/mepres/primary/default.htm" target="_blank">MEP</a>?<br><br>
We are going to "play" with both of these over the summer to see if we like them. MEP is free but I had it printed at Staples (the practice book and lesson book - Year 1a) for a little less than $25. I made it into a workbook but it seems pretty hands on.<br><br>
ETA: Miquon is very much a "self discovery" program. It's really different! And I would purchase it through Rainbow Resources since it's cheaper and you can get one of the books as a "bargain book" (really cheap).
 

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What about these? They're fun.<br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fs%2Fref%3Dnb_sb_noss%3Furl%3Dsearch-alias%253Daps%26field-keywords%3Dtang%2Bmath" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...ords=tang+math</a>
 

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Have you looked at any of Mitsumasa Anno's books? They may have too much story, but the math is good. Here are links to a couple.<br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FAnnos-Mysterious-Multiplying-Masaichiro-Anno%2Fdp%2F0698117530%2Fref%3Dpd_cp_b_2" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Annos-Mysterio.../ref=pd_cp_b_2</a><br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FAnnos-Math-Games-Mitsumasa-Anno%2Fdp%2F0399211519%2Fref%3Dpd_sim_b_67" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Annos-Math-Gam...ef=pd_sim_b_67</a><br><br><br>
We also like Greg Tang's books. They are full of tricks for doing all sorts of mathematical operations.
 

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David M. Schwartz <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FDavid-M.-Schwartz%2Fe%2FB000APFLNQ%2Fref%3Dntt_athr_dp_pel_1" target="_blank">has some great books</a> about math concepts. My kids also loved <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FTheoni-Pappas%2Fe%2FB001K7YRT2%2Fref%3Dsr_ntt_srch_lnk_1%3F_encoding%3DUTF8%26qid%3D1274305255%26sr%3D1-1" target="_blank">Theoni Pappas' books</a>, starting with Penrose at about age 4-5. Exploring concepts and "number sense", rather than arithmetic, is what I'd focus on. I think a strong conceptual foundation is what ensures that early math is really understood rather than simply memorized and executed.<br><br>
I have a 7-year-old who got really interested in math at age 4 and we pretty much just focused on playfully exploring concepts for that first year or two. She is doing very well indeed, thanks I think to <i>not</i> rushing into arithmetic. She learned the computational algorithms incredibly easily when we did start with arithmetic has not struggled at all as we've got into stuff like converting decimals, fractions, ratios and percents.<br><br>
Miranda
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>moominmamma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15424831"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My kids also loved <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FTheoni-Pappas%2Fe%2FB001K7YRT2%2Fref%3Dsr_ntt_srch_lnk_1%3F_encoding%3DUTF8%26qid%3D1274305255%26sr%3D1-1" target="_blank">Theoni Pappas' books</a>, starting with Penrose at about age 4-5.</div>
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I have 2 Penrose books sitting in my "wish list" on Amazon.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>moominmamma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15424831"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I think a strong conceptual foundation is what ensures that early math is really understood rather than simply memorized and executed.</div>
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I agree, which is why I like MEP and Miquon.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy"> I knew you ladies would have ideas. I will look into all the suggestions. Thank you. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>moominmamma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15424831"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Exploring concepts and "number sense", rather than arithmetic, is what I'd focus on. I think a strong conceptual foundation is what ensures that early math is really understood rather than simply memorized and executed.</div>
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ITA, but I'm not the one who decides what areas she focuses on. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"> It is a joy to see her pause & think as she works out a problem, though. I think the only thing she has actually memorized is 5+5; the rest she figures out anew each time. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>no5no5</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15424882"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">ITA, but I'm not the one who decides what areas she focuses on. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"></div>
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No, it totally get that: I have very single-minded kids who have sometimes continued relentlessly on trajectories that I'd prefer they abandoned or re-directed. But if you see a fire burning in one direction, you can choose to feed it in that direction, or you can stuff little bits of delectable tinder in in other places and encourage it to gobble them up and start moving in other directions. It might do so, it might continue in its original direction, or it might turn into a conflagration burning all over the place.<br><br>
Generally I've had very enthusiastic reactions even from my "7 + 8 is 15" kids when I say things like "Hey, did you know that there are numbers smaller than zero?" Or "What I love about triangles is that they live inside invisible rectangles that are exactly twice as big as they are." Or "Well <i>my</i> favourite number is pi." IME the addition-obsessed kid easily becomes fascinated with other mathematical concepts.<br><br>
Miranda
 

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Oh, Miranda, we are in total agreement. I guess I just didn't express myself well. DD is not all about arithmetic. It's just a new expression of her number sense. She's not memorizing facts; she's exploring ideas. I am very mathy (as is DH), so we've talked about negative numbers, infinity, etc., quite a lot. A few months back she was adamant that there was a number bigger than infinity: "innegaty." <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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I love the MathStart series. Theyr'e actual stories that kind of "sneak" the math concepts in. LOVE them. Written by Stuart J. Murphy. Our most recent find was "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FTally-OMalley-MathStart-Stuart-Murphy%2Fdp%2F0060531649%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1274324268%26sr%3D8-1" target="_blank">Tally O'Malley</a>"<br><br>
My 6yo tested at 4th grade comprehension last year (when he was 5yo) and these were perfect. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> The books are leveled based on the child's math concept awareness and they actually start at some REALLY basic concepts and move upward. But they're really awesome--especially if you have a reader on your hands. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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I love <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FMath-Know-Mathematics-Mary-Cavanagh%2Fdp%2F0669535966%2Fref%3Dpd_sim_b_2" target="_blank">this series</a> of books. I have Math on Call, which is for older grades, but I think that the Math to Know book is the one for early elementary.<br><br>
They are basically really great math dictionaries which explain clearly various math concepts as well as formulas and how to do various operations.
 

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Check out "Math for Smarty Pants" by Marilyn Burns.<br><br>
It's got a story frame, but "The Number Devil" is also really cool.
 

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I found this one at the library this week and love it. It literally has one million dots and a few other facts involving big numbers on the way to 1,000,000. the pictures are fun, but the point s how many dots.<br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fs%2Fref%3Dnb_sb_noss%3Furl%3Dsearch-alias%253Dstripbooks%26field-keywords%3Da%2Bmillion%2Bdots%26x%3D0%26y%3D0" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...n+dots&x=0&y=0</a><br><br>
It only has the one concept, so I wouldn't buy it, but I would definitely check it out if your library has it.
 

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<span style="text-decoration:underline;">G is for Googol</span> is a great book! It has math terms to go with each letter of the alphabet, so you can read it and talk about concepts, not necessarily doing computations. I got it used at Amazon a while back and my dd really enjoyed it. She has not actually enjoyed doing math- with Miquon as much.
 
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