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Discussion Starter #1
I normally produce twice the amount my baby eats. I recently took dairy and wheat out of my diet to see if that would help her. Could that have caused my recent decrease in milk supply?
 

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It could relate - or it could be that the cut in calories decreased supply, or that your supply is becoming more regulated as your baby gets older. Or if your baby started solids?
 

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Any chance you cut out oats? They are a galactagogue.
 

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I wouldn't think so. I have Celiac Disease and can't have either thing in my diet. I make an adequate supply for ds. However, if there was a change in your caloric consumption due to these changes that could affect your supply. Hmm... I think La Leche League has a free hotline you could try.
 

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I am gluten free and dairy free, I was dairy free even before I got pg, but found out that I had to eliminate gluten when ds was 3 months and I lost about 10 pounds that I'm finally putting back on. Anyway, I did notice a supply decrease and had to up my calories and fat. I started having smoothies with coconut milk or nut butters, that helped and I try to eat an avocado every day. It came back pretty fast though onve I ate more and my body adjusted to the change.
 

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Hindyg,<br>
I think PP is onto something. Is your caloric intake less now? Is your protein and healthy fat intake less now?<br><br>
If you answered no to the questions above it is possible that whatever you have cut had a supply boosting affect, in which case you can either try experimenting with other foods that are high in protein, high in healthy fat or you can try taking herbs that might help (e.g., Mother's Milk Tea, Fenugreek, etc.)<br>
~Cath
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks all. I am trying to slowly figure it out. It could definitely be my caloric intake...though I do feel I am hungry/snacking all day. Thankfully...I am still making enough for my baby with around 8 oz to freeze each day...its just a big change from when I have over 20 oz a day to freeze.
 

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PAK--Just wanted to share my story...<br><br>
I started a TED 2 weeks ago and my supply did initially drop. (I EPump and have been pumping over 30 oz for well over a year now, right when I started the diet my supply dropped to around 25oz). I know it was due to calorie intake, I just could not seem to eat enough to feel well/full. Once I figured out how to eat enough to not feel really hungry all day my supply came right back. Their were no other factors involved but the TED (I still have not gotten AF) to attribute the drop.
 

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I would also guess it's due to a decreased calorie intake. Many dairy products have a good amount of calories in a small package (cheese, for example) and cutting them out could be cutting out calories and fat you need to keep your milk supply up. Can you eat more, or add things like nuts or avocado?
 

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I didn't notice before that it's an oversupply-->not oversupply issue. I thought it was normal-->low. Dairy consumption is linked to oversupply.
 

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There are certain foods you don't want to eat while you have a snotty nose/plugged sinuses, because those foods will encourage significant increase in the amount of mucus you make.<br><br>
Milk production is basically the same process as is mucus production. Therefor, the same things that activate excess production of mucus will activate excess production of milk.<br><br>
Those things include dairy, oatmeal, and eggs.<br><br>
When we are sick, we are often encouarged to eat chicken soup. This is because the same chemical in poultry which causes us to sleep, also decreases mucus (therefor milk) production.<br><br>
Turkey contains more of this chemical than does chicken, however, turkey was not as readily available in the early times of the USA. Chicken, on the other hand, was prevalent. Thus "chicken soup" rather than "turkey soup."<br><br>
The moral of the story... if you removed dairy and perhaps also increased turkey, you have the perfect recipe to decrease milk.
 
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