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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Amethyst is 5, she just started public kindergarten last week, full day, five days a week. We had been planning on homeschooling, but everyone that we saw asked if she was starting school and she decided she wanted to go to ps. So we just went for it. She HATES it, and I hate feeling like I have to make her go. She loves learning, just devours her books (we have a library practically), she is just scared of being at school. She is very attached to James and I, and Asheby too for that matter. We always do everything as a family. James is a disabled veteran so he's home also, so we are VERY close. And we love it that way.<br>
I was homeschooled for part of my school career, graduated when I was 16, and I did very well at it. I did it myself too. I am just so nervous about doing kindergarten!! I don't know how to teach someone to read!! We live in a very small town, and we are pretty much the outsiders here. I'd say most of the kids in her class are related, have the same last name, etc... We don't have any extracurricular activites that she can do here either. No sports, no ballet, no gymnastics, NOTHING. We are trying to move, but our house just isn't selling.<br>
She does extremely well with adults, can carry on whole conversations with almost anyone. She is very smart and would be reading now if I just knew where to start. At the school the teachers told us they will be learning their letters and numbers this year, but she has known them and been able to write them since she was TWO! BTW, the reason I was homeschooled was because I was sick of all the wasted time at school, when I could do it myself in a tenth the time. She also has severe food allergies and the the school just can't seem to figure it out!! UGH, I am just so upset by all of this!<br>
I am just afraid that we won't be stimulating enough for her at home. I would love to homeschool, I guess I'm just scared, hence the name of this thread. James is onboard too, btw. We just don't want her to miss out on anything. Can anyone give me any reassurance? Let me know we can do this? Please, only positive responses, I am seriously in tears over this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Also, where do I start? I am a very structured person, if I don't have at least a loose schedule, I never do it, so I need some kind of curriculum. At least for the first year. And I don't have enough money to be trying more than one.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
Take a moment and just breathe. Write down your concerns and then look for answers. Teaching a child to read? You'll find several different methods on here, and on other homeschool sites. (btw, <a href="http://www.starfall.com" target="_blank">www.starfall.com</a> is a great intro). Stimulation -how do you stimulate her on the weekends, and before she went to school?<br><br>
It's okay to be nervous - I think most of us were at the beginning! And it's fine to take it year by year, too. Just hit each of the issues head on and see where you get with them.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MPsSweetie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9082863"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Also, where do I start? I am a very structured person, if I don't have at least a loose schedule, I never do it, so I need some kind of curriculum. At least for the first year. And I don't have enough money to be trying more than one.</div>
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Kindergarten is very easy to do with free or cheap curriculum. Try <a href="http://www.letteroftheweek.com" target="_blank">www.letteroftheweek.com</a> for a free preK-1st curriculum. There's also a ton of supplements like <a href="http://www.janbrett.com" target="_blank">www.janbrett.com</a> , <a href="http://www.internet4classrooms.com/month2month.htm" target="_blank">http://www.internet4classrooms.com/month2month.htm</a> , <a href="http://www.donnayoung.org" target="_blank">www.donnayoung.org</a> , and can't forget <a href="http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/" target="_blank">http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/</a> for any question you might have - from laws to learning styles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you. I don't know why I'm so nervous!! I know I can do it, I just feel like her whole adult life is in my hands, and I want to make sure she can do it. But now that I think about it, we must be doing something right, she is already very smart and very mature for her age. I am not much of an "outside" person, so I am scared she won't get enough outside play time, but Asheby will be walking soon, and I'm sure he will want to be outside also.<br>
I guess I am just overwhelmed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you sooooo much, I can breathe now! I CAN do this!
 

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you can do this! i've only got a minute so this will be a jumbled post to ya - sorry! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> for reading you can do a few things that will be cheap and effective imo. you can buy the leapfrog DVD's "the letter factory" to teach the sound each letter makes, and follow it with "the word factory" which teaches how to blend the sounds to create words. you can utilize <a href="http://www.starfall.com" target="_blank">www.starfall.com</a> to teach the same things. also, if you want a more structured curriculum, you can add the tanglewood reading program here: <a href="http://www.tanglewoodeducation.com/ReallyReading2.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.tanglewoodeducation.com/ReallyReading2.pdf</a><br><br>
you can also buy cheap workbooks if she likes that kind of thing. if you use explode the code, i word start with workbooks a,b, and c first. but read reviews first at <a href="http://www.homeschoolreviews.com" target="_blank">www.homeschoolreviews.com</a> - cuz some people hate this program. you can also use teach your child to read in 100 easy lessons. again - it's loved or hated, so read the reviews first.<br><br>
you can also try <a href="http://www.headsprout.com" target="_blank">www.headsprout.com</a> and do the first 3 lessons for free -- it's excellent!<br><br>
as for other subjectsm try <a href="http://www.amblesideonline.com" target="_blank">www.amblesideonline.com</a> or <a href="http://www.tanglewoodeducation.com" target="_blank">www.tanglewoodeducation.com</a> or <a href="http://www.letteroftheweek.com" target="_blank">www.letteroftheweek.com</a> or <a href="http://www.coreknowledge.org" target="_blank">www.coreknowledge.org</a> and click on lessons. all of those site are free.<br><br>
as for dance and gymnastics, you can join blockbuster online for under $20 a month and have educational videos (including dance instruction) delivered to your home. plus, you and dh can rent cool movies and family movies too! sorry if there's typos!!!<br><br>
hope this helps!!
 

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I felt very nervous when we first made the decision, too, but since we've actually been homeschooling, I've found that we are actually more stimulating than the school, and my ds loves it. You can do it! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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one more thing - check out lillian's website. she post here often and her web link is below her signature! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
again - sorry if there's typos!!
 

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We just went to the first of a series of 'intro to homeschooling' classes put on by the local Christian HS group (which, of course, means I am now an expert on the subject <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"> ). Their advice was to do about a half-hour of structured learning for a kindergartener. That made me feel so much better, knowing that you really are easing into the teaching part of homeschoooling, even if you are planning to be somewhat structured in your approach.<br><br>
And I second the online resources (my own DS loves starfall). Even if you don't want your DD on the computer, you get lots of great ideas about how to teach phonics, for example (if that's how you want to teach reading).<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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<span>Amee, in view of the fact that she's known all the letters and how to write them since she was two, and she can comfortably carry on conversations with adults, she's obviously quite a little sponge. It will be a piece o' cake to meet her needs. I'd be sure to keep learning activities pared down to covering just what she needs to learn without having needless repetition. Well, that's important, in my opinion, with any child - but maybe even more important to keep your eye on with one who's mind is moving so quickly.<br><br>
You can take her to the library and peruse the juvenile non-fiction section while she's picking out books. You'll find wonderful things there, including many books with interesting projects you might enjoy doing together.<br><br>
Take a look through my page of annotated links - <a href="http://besthomeschooling.org/gateway/inted06.html" target="_blank">The Written Word, Reading and Language</a> - for some good reading. One of the links, for instance, goes to Home Education Magazine's wonderful archive of articles about reading. There are some great threads on reading here in MDC, but I couldn't get the Search feature to work - maybe it will be working later today. There are some other threads I'll toss you links to at that point as well.<br>
Have fun! (<i>I know you will!</i>)<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> Lillian</span>
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks again. I went and withdrew her after school today, so we have officially started this journey. I go from super excited to OMG what am I doing, but I'll be okay. I think once we get started and I see her learning things, from me!, I'll feel better.<br>
Of course today she had a much better day at ps, but when we asked she said she wants to homeschool, so I hope we are doing the right thing. No, I really know we are.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MPsSweetie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9087365"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Thanks again. I went and withdrew her after school today, so we have officially started this journey.<br>
Of course today she had a much better day at ps, but when we asked she said she wants to homeschool, so I hope we are doing the right thing. No, I really know we are.</div>
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<span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/clap.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="clap"><br><br><br>
You also wrote:<br></span>
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I think once we get started and I see her learning things, from me!, I'll feel better.</td>
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<span>You mentioned that she knew the numbers and alphabet and how to write it all when she was two - and she can carry her own in a conversation with adults - how did all that happen? She's already been learning from you. If you just take a look at what she already knows, which is <i>already</i> beyond anything a kindergartener is expected to learn by the end of the school year, you won't need to have anything demonstrated in order to know it's happening. All you'll need to do, as you said earlier, is provide lots of fun and enriching activities that will keep her happy.<br><br>
I still can't access the search feature, but I thought of some books that would be very helpful. If you go to the Amazon pages that describe them, you can click on the pictures of the books and be able to "search inside" and look all around at content. Very cool feature!<br><br><a href="http://amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Famazon.com%2Fo%2FASIN%2F0761563601%2Fref%3Dnosim%2F" target="_blank">The Ultimate Book of Homeschooling Ideas</a>: 500+ Fun and Creative Learning Activities for Kids Ages 3-12<br><br><a href="http://amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Famazon.com%2Fo%2FASIN%2F0761520287%2Fref%3Dnosim%2F" target="_blank">Homeschooling: The Early Years</a>: Your Complete Guide to Successfully Homeschooling the 3- to 8- Year-Old Child<br><br><a href="http://amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Famazon.com%2Fo%2FASIN%2F0761527885%2Fref%3Dnosim" target="_blank">The First Year of Homeschooling Your Child</a>: Your Complete Guide to Getting Off to the Right Start<br><br><a href="http://amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Famazon.com%2Fo%2FASIN%2F0609803433%2Fref%3Dnosim%2F" target="_blank">Getting Started on Home Learning</a>: How and Why to Teach Your Kids at Home. This is wonderful, and now available for as little as a penny through Amazon.<br><br><i>And anything by David Albert</i>: <a href="http://www.skylarksings.com/" target="_blank">his website</a>, which has chapter excerpts of all the books. Just click on "Essays" over in the left hand column.<br><br>
Have fun! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> Lillian<br><br></span>
 

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Congrats, you will do great! You've already done a great job, you just get to continue doing what you were already doing.<br><br>
As for freaking out about her entire adulthood in your hands, just take it day to day and year by year. Anybody can get overwhelmed thinking about the next 13 years, but the next week is easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Omg, you guys are just too nice here. I was expecting... I don't know, just not this. Especially because I am so nervous about it and wasn't sure if I should do it.<br><br>
I am really so excited to see her learning. And yes, I guess I have taught her quite a bit, but that was back when James was in Iraq and there wasn't a baby in the picture. But I'm excited about involving Asheby too. I am a huge reader and reading was how Amethyst learned so much when she was younger. I really don't know why the thought of teaching her how to read throws me, but it does. But like I said, I'm sure once we start we'll do great. I just need to get in the groove, lol.<br>
Again, thanks for encouraging me so much, you guys really have me excited about this!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MPsSweetie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9087785"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Omg, you guys are just too nice here. I was expecting... I don't know, just not this. Especially because I am so nervous about it and wasn't sure if I should do it.<br><br>
I am really so excited to see her learning. And yes, I guess I have taught her quite a bit, but that was back when James was in Iraq and there wasn't a baby in the picture. But I'm excited about involving Asheby too. I am a huge reader and reading was how Amethyst learned so much when she was younger. I really don't know why the thought of teaching her how to read throws me, but it does. But like I said, I'm sure once we start we'll do great. I just need to get in the groove, lol.<br>
Again, thanks for encouraging me so much, you guys really have me excited about this!</div>
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It sounds like you are already doing a great job. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"> You can do this. I felt the same anxiety when I first looked into hsing, but I will tell you that there is nothing that the ps could teach her that you can't do better. Remember that even the best teachers (and good luck finding those) cannot give her the attention that you can, even with the babe in the picture. They have 20-30 other students. You have only her, and you have the advantage of knowing her, and being able to follow her lead, none of which a ps would have.<br>
Good luck, mama! It sounds like you are doing the right thing.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>MPsSweetie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9087785"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">But like I said, I'm sure once we start we'll do great. I just need to get in the groove, lol.</div>
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<span><br>
Okay, I'm gonna' stop being so subtle and just say it. Sweetie, <i>you're already in the groove</i> - just hang out there and enjoy it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">. If you try to get into a different one, it can make it harder to get off to a good "start."<br><br>
Here's a thread that has links to some good articles about <a href="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=417993" target="_blank">decompression/deschooling</a>. You might find some helpful ideas in them. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> Lillian<br><br></span>
 

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Congrats! It will be fine. This is our second year of homeschooling (he would have been in K last year), and I have periodic freakouts, but overall am really happy with our decision. He was awake at 5:30am with a nightmare, and then went back to sleep until almost 9am. I was so thankful I didn't have to wake him up at 7am to rush him out the door to school.<br><br>
My best advice for this age: Don't feel like you have to be "doing something" every single moment. I have found that the richest moments come when I am busy with laundry or on the phone, and I walk in the room to find that he has created or discovered or learned something new and amazing, all on his own.<br><br>
And to make you feel better, I never went to Kindergarten. I barely went to first and second grade (small town, lax attendance, and parents who took us on a lot of trips out of town). I graduated with honors from one of the top Universities in the country. And my parents weren't doing anything special at home aside from every day life.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>oceanbaby</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9089208"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My best advice for this age: Don't feel like you have to be "doing something" every single moment. I have found that the richest moments come when I am busy with laundry or on the phone, and I walk in the room to find that he has created or discovered or learned something new and amazing, all on his own.<br></div>
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We're finding this too. I set things up to do, mostly because he loves it, but I leave it open too, so that he can do what he wants, an he has surprised me more than once with the incredible things he can do when he wants to. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>oceanbaby</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">have found that the richest moments come when I am busy with laundry or on the phone, and I walk in the room to find that he has created or discovered or learned something new and amazing, all on his own.</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>blsilva</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">We're finding this too. I set things up to do, mostly because he loves it, but I leave it open too, so that he can do what he wants, an he has surprised me more than once with the incredible things he can do when he wants to.</div>
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<span>And you come to realize that these things are only to be <i>expected</i> when we're out of their way - because we human beings are <i>natural born learners</i>. Have you seen this quote - I just love it!</span>
<blockquote></blockquote><span>It's from a book by John A. Taylor - Notes On An Unhurried Journey, Avalon Publishing Group (originally published by Four Walls Eight Windows) - and it's <i>by</i> Professor T. Ripaldi:<br><br>
"When we adults think of children, there is a simple truth which we ignore: childhood is not preparation for life, childhood is life. A child isn't getting ready to live - a child is living. The child is constantly confronted with the nagging question, "What are you going to be?" Courageous would be the youngster who, looking the adult squarely in the face, would say, "I'm not going to be anything; I already am." We adults would be shocked by such an insolent remark for we have forgotten, if indeed we ever knew, that a child is an active participating and contributing member of society from the time he is born. Childhood isn't a time when he is molded into a human who will then live life; he is a human who is living life. No child will miss the zest and joy of living unless these are denied him by adults who have convinced themselves that childhood is a period of preparation.<br><br>
How much heartache we would save ourselves if we would recognize the child as a partner with adults in the process of living, rather than always viewing him as an apprentice. How much we would teach each other...adults with the experience and children with the freshness. How full both our lives could be. A little child may not lead us, but at least we ought to discuss the trip with him for, after all, life is his and her journey, too." - Professor T. Ripaldi</span>
<span><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Lillian</span>
 
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