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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,<br><br>
We planted a TON of green beans (mixture of bush and pole) this year. In past years I've blanched the green beans and frozen them in gallon plastic bags. Now that we've gone plastic-free for food storage, I'm slightly at a loss for what to do...<br><br>
I'm not a canner and I prefer the taste of blanched/frozen beans to canned, anyhow. I'm afraid that if I blanch the beans and put them in glass jars to freeze they will be difficult to remove. I suppose I could simply try to remember to take out a jar of beans a few hours before dinner, but in all likelihood, this won't happen.<br><br>
Any ideas?<br><br>
Thanks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/treehugger.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Treehugger">:
 

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Are you at all willing to use plastic for this? Ziplocs are one of the things I can't/won't give up because of food storage <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> I'll try to think of something else though!
 

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IQF them, *then* stick in your jars in the freezer. Then they potentially won't stick.<br>
Just like what the manufacturers/processors do, it's just that it'll take you a bit longer to freeze the foods unless you have your own blast chiller or something.
 

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If you prefer not to use plastic containers or ziploc bags you could try freezing the beans on a cookie sheet first before putting them in the jars. I use this method with berries, it works well for them.
 

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If you are interested, you might want to try making shuck beans. It's something I grew up with. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> You remove the ends/stems, peel off any strings, then string up whole green beans through the middle with a needle and thread, stacking bean atop bean. We used to make tons when I was a kid and ate them all winter.<br>
Each string of beans was over foot long, maybe two feet long if I remember correctly, and then we tied those to clothes hangers, about 5 strings to a hanger, and hung them to dry in a well ventilated place. When it's time to cook, you soak them, then cook them for hours. You can find recipes on the web.<br><br>
All of my family sitting around, stringing beans at harvest time is a favorite memory of mine. The taste is unique, you may or may not like them, but the experience would definitely be interesting for you. And no plastic involved! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks to everyone for the ideas! I do the cookie sheet thing with berries, too. Hadn't thought of it for beans. I'll probably try the shuck beans, as well. I'm always looking for new ways. Thanks, Everyone!!!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 
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