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I am ready to start CBE training and have narrowed it down to either CI or ALACE. I have read a ton of positive feedback on ALACE (and Rahima Baldwin is one of my heros <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/luxlove.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="throb">) but I haven't been able to find too much info on experiences with Childbirth International.<br><br>
CI has a dual training program for CBE and Doula training that is super cost effective and if I go with them, that is the route I would take. If I choose ALACE, I will only be able to afford the CBE training at this point. Because my kiddos are still young, I don't anticipate starting doula work right away but would <b>love</b> the experience the certification can offer.<br><br>
I'm drawn to ALACE because of the very holistic approach they offer. CI doesn't really talk much one their website about holistic practices other than "Routine interventions without any medical indications have no place in maternity care." Can anyone elaborate more on their approach?<br><br>
The other aspect of CI that is appealing are the in-depth areas they cover on communication, physiology, and teaching skills. How does this compare to ALACE?<br><br>
I live in a very diverse metropolitan area, where literally there are 1/4 of a million dollar homes and less than a mile away are low income housing projects where every day there are moms who are going to the hospital by themselves because they have nobody <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> . It is my vision to be able to reach out to both groups. I would love to eventually connect with a local community agency to put together a program to offer CBE and Doula care to women who would never be able to afford it. I'm sure that many of you are experienced in this type of thing.<br><br>
I give the latter info because I am wondering if there is a better CBE program to go with if part of your drive is to help single/low income mothers? I mean better as far as being recognized by an agency that will connect you with moms in need.<br><br>
I'm sort of just talking out all my concerns and thoughts as I type so if you are still with me, I thank you so much!! If you have any advice/thoughts/insight, I would surely appreciate it!<br><br>
Peace,<br>
~danielle
 

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bumping this up because i was wondering the same thing <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>earthluvinmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7931093"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am ready to start CBE training and have narrowed it down to either CI or ALACE. I have read a ton of positive feedback on ALACE (and Rahima Baldwin is one of my heros <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/luxlove.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="throb">) but I haven't been able to find too much info on experiences with Childbirth International.<br><br>
CI has a dual training program for CBE and Doula training that is super cost effective and if I go with them, that is the route I would take. If I choose ALACE, I will only be able to afford the CBE training at this point. Because my kiddos are still young, I don't anticipate starting doula work right away but would <b>love</b> the experience the certification can offer.<br><br>
I'm drawn to ALACE because of the very holistic approach they offer. CI doesn't really talk much one their website about holistic practices other than "Routine interventions without any medical indications have no place in maternity care." Can anyone elaborate more on their approach?<br><br>
The other aspect of CI that is appealing are the in-depth areas they cover on communication, physiology, and teaching skills. How does this compare to ALACE?<br><br>
I live in a very diverse metropolitan area, where literally there are 1/4 of a million dollar homes and less than a mile away are low income housing projects where every day there are moms who are going to the hospital by themselves because they have nobody <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> . It is my vision to be able to reach out to both groups. I would love to eventually connect with a local community agency to put together a program to offer CBE and Doula care to women who would never be able to afford it. I'm sure that many of you are experienced in this type of thing.<br><br>
I give the latter info because I am wondering if there is a better CBE program to go with if part of your drive is to help single/low income mothers? I mean better as far as being recognized by an agency that will connect you with moms in need.<br><br>
I'm sort of just talking out all my concerns and thoughts as I type so if you are still with me, I thank you so much!! If you have any advice/thoughts/insight, I would surely appreciate it!<br><br>
Peace,<br>
~danielle</div>
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I am a CBI certified doula and have nothing but good thing to say about my training.<br><br>
I am wondering if you could ellaborate on the holistic approach of ALACE. CBI does not think that routine procedures are good and should be avoided. They do not introduce clinical procedures if that's what you are wondering. Again, if you give me a bit more of what your looking for I'm sure I can let you know!<br><br>
The training is amazing if you are good with at home study. You get 4 manuals including 2 sections of Physiology which is fabulous! It gives detailed info and allows you to explore the physiology of a woman's body and what the interventions do to the body. It teaches how the pelvis moves in order to accomodate the baby etc. The communication aspect is great as well and helps you better speak to your clients. I learned a valuable tool to use called reflection, which is perfect to help women deal with previous births or to use to process their most recent birth. The teaching skills were deatiled and I think that now they have video for you to watch showing the techniques.<br><br>
Hope that answers some of your questions.
 

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I'm almost done with my CBI training. I've done the doula/CBE combined training and absolutely love it! I like their philosophy of teaching, I like that it's completely distance learning. I just have to attend 2 births and send in my teaching video and I'm done.
 

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I don't really have time to answer this right now, but if you do a search of this forum you will find that CBI has been discussed - always favorably AFAIK - a whole bunch of time.<br><br>
As for if they take a holistic approach, I am not sure what you mean by that either. Do they teach you how to use alternative therapies on your clients? No, but neither does any other program because that is outside a doula's scope (unless she has specific training) They do teach you to about evidence based practices and how to apply them.
 

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I am an ALACE trained Labor Assistant/Birth Doula. I am getting my certification at CAPPA for my Post postpartum doula certification, and I am also going through the DONA certification later this year.<br><br>
Ok, now that I got all that out! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I also looked into the Childbirth International course and I note these Major differences-<br><br>
**It costs $410 for CBI, $425 for ALACE. BUT if you pay 1 month Early the Alace program is only $395, + $100 off if you have taken other training.<br><br>
**Alace is more widely recognized and accredited. They are the oldest training organization of their kind in the United States. CBI has 600 members, ALACE has had over 2,500 enroll in just the Labor Assistant program (as of 2004), not to mention the thousands of members, and trainers in 10 countries.<br><br>
**Alace requires 6 births, while CBI only requires 2. The more time spent training = better education.<br><br>
**Alace does not give you a time limit to finish certification, CBI says you have to finish in 3 years.<br><br>
** Alace requires 8 books, and CBI only requires 3. With the wealth of information available reading more can only increase your knowledge.<br><br><br><b>PLUS-</b> the workshop gives you so much more then you can train yourself at home, as there is a teacher who knows not only about being a Doula, but is also a Midwife. In the Alace workshop you also have pregnant models so that you can feel the gestational age of the baby. Not to mention it was such an amazing experience and the women I met a that workshop will be friends for life.<br><br>
I didn't mean to write this long, but once I got started I just kept on going. I am sure CBI is a wonderful company to get trained with, and I am not trying to put them down. I know it is easier to get certified with CBI and that is really appealing, but getting a more extensive education seemed to appeal to me.. this is just my opinion. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
No matter where you have been trained with DOULAS ROCK!!!
 

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I went back and added my responses in blue. Nothing is meant to be hurtful to ALACE, just stating my personal thoughts! My only "complaint" with CBI is that I do wish I would have had hands on training. I ended up going with DONA to receive that part though and it worked out perfect! I feel VERY well prepared and VERY educated by training with CBI!<br><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>SDDoula</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7975036"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am an ALACE trained Labor Assistant/Birth Doula. I am getting my certification at CAPPA for my Post postpartum doula certification, and I am also going through the DONA certification later this year.<br><br>
Ok, now that I got all that out! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I also looked into the Childbirth International course and I note these Major differences-<br><br>
**It costs $410 for CBI, $425 for ALACE. BUT if you pay 1 month Early the Alace program is only $395, + $100 off if you have taken other training.<br><br>
**Alace is more widely recognized and accredited. They are the oldest training organization of their kind in the United States. CBI has 600 members, ALACE has had over 2,500 enroll in just the Labor Assistant program (as of 2004), not to mention the thousands of members, and trainers in 10 countries.<br><br>
**Alace requires 6 births, while CBI only requires 2. The more time spent training = better education. <span style="color:#0000FF;">Yes it is true that more births are required, but I have found that as soon as I had the credentials behind my name I began to get clients more readily. I think CBI wants to give their doulas excellent training and send them out to reach more women. Going through an organization that requires more births doesn't mean much to me. Since I am certified I am now able to work in more locations and get more phone calls. Had I gone with another organization I would still be searching for my certifying births as a doula in training and not able to reach the women in my area</span><br><br>
**Alace does not give you a time limit to finish certification, CBI says you have to finish in 3 years.<span style="color:#0000FF;">I personally think it is good to have some sort of time limit on training, otherwise a women could begin, get her reading done, take a workshop a year later, drop it and not come back to it until 3 years later. Retaining the knowledge you receive is very important. Getting your certification and then going right into business increases the odds of holding onto all you have learned</span><br><br>
** Alace requires 8 books, and CBI only requires 3. With the wealth of information available reading more can only increase your knowledge.<span style="color:#0000FF;">I can't think of anyone in the program that has only read the 3 books on the list. CBI encourages you to read more on your own time to further your knowledge base</span><br><br><br><b>PLUS-</b> the workshop gives you so much more then you can train yourself at home, as there is a teacher who knows not only about being a Doula, but is also a Midwife. In the Alace workshop you also have pregnant models so that you can feel the gestational age of the baby. Not to mention it was such an amazing experience and the women I met a that workshop will be friends for life.<br><span style="color:#0000FF;">I'm not seeing how feeling the gestational age of a pregnant woman applies to a doula's practice of emotional, physical and informational support. ALACE does not promote their doula's to do these things to their clients so this could be seen as a fun added activity, but shouldn't make your decision to go with one organization over the other</span><br><br>
I didn't mean to write this long, but once I got started I just kept on going. I am sure CBI is a wonderful company to get trained with, and I am not trying to put them down. I know it is easier to get certified with CBI and that is really appealing, but getting a more extensive education seemed to appeal to me.. this is just my opinion. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
No matter where you have been trained with DOULAS ROCK!!!</div>
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I am going through the ALACE CBE training. Before I enrolled, I too looked into CBI. The price is comparable and I like that CBI is more internet friendly. The ALACE childbirth educator prgram is very in depth. Their manual is very huge and one must complete the 8 modules of reading and learning activities. The training director reviews them all and then you can take the exam and become provisionally certified. After that, you have a list of 15-18 books to read, a series of classes to review, and turn in a sample of your teaching to become fully certified. There are other posts around here that cover the program in more detail.<br><br>
All available CBE programs are good. I like ALACE because it started as Informed Homebirth and changed the name to apply to more women. Some of the books required are more midwifery/herbal orientated. The other organizations required books seem to be a bit more main stream. The great thing about ALACE is that you can tailor your teaching to the needs of your clients.
 

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Your response is great, Acacia... I would probably say "valuable experiential learning opportunity" rather than "fun added activity", but I think our meaning is the same <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
The fetal palpation exercise really looks at position, not gestational age, though perhaps the PP's trainer talked about it. Also, not all of the ALACE trainers are midwives--I know one is a homebirth midwife and one is a CNM, one isn't a midwife, and I don't know about the fourth. But they definitely all teach in the midwifery model of care.<br><br>
The OP asked about teaching on communication, physiology, and teaching skills. I would say that ALACE does a lot of physiology, and touches on the others. The nature of a three-day workshop is certainly very different from that of a long-term distance course--it sounds like you might be a good candidate to do the distance ed through CBI and a workshop through ALACE to get the best of both worlds--I know it isn't easy to come up with the money, but as the PP said, you may be able to get a discount for the ALACE workshop after completing CBI--I don't know if CBI is on their radar yet, but DONA and CAPPA doulas do. Also, ALACE offers a registration coupon with a substantial discount every year between November and January.
 
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