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In your own experience or in thinking about other homeschooling parents that you admire, what does a successful homeschooling parent look like? What are the personality traits, characteristics or skills that make a successful homeschooling parent? Why?

Have you ever met anyone that you thought should not be homeschooling their kids (I am not asking about families that decide public/private school is a better fit for them)? Why?
 

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Patience and perseverance are a must

I am in my 8th year homeschooling my children and sometimes I wonder if I should be homeschooling!
I think the most successful homeschoolers I know are the ones that look at homeschooling as a part of life. They are not recreating school at home. They know their children and do what is best for their children and don't worry about being behind or what the public schools are doing.
There is definitely a certain level of commitment one has to have. It is fine to take a day off if everyone needs a break and is not in the mood for "school", but I think you need to be careful not to do that too often.
Organization certainly helps. I am not a good planner, so we tend to fly by the seats of our pants a little too often. I have to really discipline myself to sit down and look at our goals and see if we are working towards them.
That is another thing; goals. I think the best homeschoolers are the ones who create achievable goals for their children and then work towards them rather than give their child a 2nd grade workbook because they are (or would be in public school) in 2nd grade.

I hope this is making sense. I am trying to do a few things at once and am hurrying a bit.
Looking forward to others answers.
Deece
 

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Impossible to answer


Every successful family will be different. Different combinations of personalities, interests, goals, priorities...I was trying to think of families that I consider to be successful homeschoolers and the only thing they all have in common is a love for their children.

If you want to homeschool successfully, you have to know yourself and know your child. You can read and study philosophies and curriculums all day long, but the best teacher is experience! Your own experience, day in and day out with your child (learning together).
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Deece in MN View Post
I think the most successful homeschoolers I know are the ones that look at homeschooling as a part of life. They are not recreating school at home. They know their children and do what is best for their children and don't worry about being behind or what the public schools are doing.
It is fine to take a day off if everyone needs a break and is not in the mood for "school", but I think you need to be careful not to do that too often.

I think the best homeschoolers are the ones who create achievable goals for their children and then work towards them rather than give their child a 2nd grade workbook because they are (or would be in public school) in 2nd grade.
We once took 5 months off because I realized we'd been homeschooling for 15 months straight! We don't tend to take vacations and since it's our lifestyle we tend to forget to take breaks.

I've only been homeschooling for 5 years.

Sincerely,
Debra, homeschooling mom of 4 ages 10, 9, 7, and 3 1/2
 

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OK pardon the saying but when I read the question the first thing that popped into my head was "damn the torpedoes and full speed ahead!"


Basically I agree that every homeschooling family is differant with differant personality combinations and differant ideas about how to go about things. But, in the long run the way I see it is they pick their path and set off. I don't know many who have looked back and wish they hadn't done it. They take off running and see what they can find and learn from. It is a part of their life, but like the rest of us we have to swim upstream in a sense since homeschooling still isn't exactly acccepted by the majority.

I hope that made sense. I'm having one of those days.
:
 

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Flexibility, an openness to new ideas, a love of learning, and the ability to separate one's own issues and needs from those of one's child.

Dar
 

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A vision, a sense of humor, an interesting identity seperate from that of the homeschooling parent, belief in the holistic education of the child, belief in multiple intelligence, and a laid-back-approach and of rolling with the punches.
 

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Quote:
OK pardon the saying but when I read the question the first thing that popped into my head was "damn the torpedoes and full speed ahead!"
: that really struck me funny!

I've been unschooling about 11 years. My answer to your questions is two fold: My number one quality is the ability to think outside of the traditional educational mindset. To be able to distance oneself from schooling in general - including timetables, achievement, grade levels, and school subject categories. It isn't easy to do. Most of us attended school throughout our entire childhoods and beyond....we have been conditioned to think in terms of this relatively new societal construct. (school)

Once we can distance ourselves from this type of thinking, we can approach each child with a blank slate........and look into their souls to see how to nurture them. And it makes for a much happier, more relaxed & contented path.

Secondly, I would say a sense of humor & zest for life. Both of these qualities are abundantly good for getting us through the messy houses & growth needed.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Spencersmom View Post
Have you ever met anyone that you thought should not be homeschooling their kids (I am not asking about families that decide public/private school is a better fit for them)? Why?
Yes, although some people here might not agree with my reasons.

I was friendly with a woman who I met through homeschooling. I was "the homeschooler" in the neighborhood and she came to me when she decided she wanted to homeschool, in order to ask questions. It was a military community so we were complete strangers prior to that.

She was extremely over-protective of both her kids, and downright coddling of her son. Her daugher was 12 and wasn't allowed to walk the distance between her house and mine without supervision. We lived three houses apart. Her son was almost 8 and still wouldn't wipe his own backside....seriously. All he would eat was chicken nuggets and Ovaltine.

Maybe these sorts of things have nothing to do with homeschooling.....IDK. I just think she was a crazy woman and a weird parent. I began to think her kids would be better off away from her ultra-controlling, enabling personality.
 

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It's different for everybody.Looking from a perspective of 17+ years in I'd have to say perseverance.Perseverance in the face of critism from family,friends and neighbors that eventually turns to admiration.It took about ten years.Lack of other options.The public schools here are dismal (I used to teach there)

It's definately become more a life style than anything else.When you abandon the mind set of "o,k, I have to get up and go to school" Everything becomes a learning opportunity" and curiosity is piqued.Which of course leads to more questions and wondering and exploring.

You do have to find a rythm to your days.For me it's never been hard,Sort of like a living meditation.Yes there is burn out,but thats apart of life and you get through it.

Lastly patience.If you don't think you posess it when you start,you'll find you have it in abundance by the time you finish.Pretty much trial by fire.Hs is certainly a make you or break you experience,but then so much of life is.I guess it's more of a question of what your're up for!
 
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