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I just found out that I failed the one hour test. With my last fullterm pregnancy, I also failed the one hour, and was *this* close to failing the three hour one too.
I have not talked with the midwife's office to see what the numbers were. Last time I failed at 147, with a limit of 140.
I am almost 200 pounds, and have a family history of diabetes. During this pregnancy, though, I have only gained 5 pounds, after losing 11 in the first trimester. I am also still nursing my three-year-old 2-4 times a day. More so now that I have colostrum, lol.
I am trying to exercise at least every other day, walking for 30-60 minutes. My diet includes a lot of cheese and other proteins, and mostly whole wheat grains, not white. I have been wanting proteins, and have made eggs at night as a snack even. I have not gained for the last month or so, and am now 29 weeks. My diet is not perfect, sometimes my life makes fast food a necessity with four older kids. I try to make good choices the rest of the time, though. When I eat, I am full so quickly, and stay that way for HOURS. I cannot eat a lot at one sitting. No more seconds.
I am not sure what to do differently. I am not sure if I should go for the 3 hour test. If I choose not to, they will assume that I have GD, and then test the baby. My heaviest of 4 was 7lb. 10 oz, my smallest 6lb. 11 oz.
I feel like I should get the test, to spare the baby testing.

I have read the info on the controversies surrounding these tests. The problem is, my midwives are in a practice with doctors, and the protocols are not always as flexible as I would want. I have been with this practice for 12 years now, and literally trust them with my life. So, I don't want to switch.

Oh, what to do?

Leocea
 

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Request that instead of taking the three hour test, they allow you to monitor your blood sugars at home for a couple weeks. This will give all of you a better idea of what's really going on. A glucometer and some testing strips aren't terribly expensive, and it's easy to do.

I was diagnosed with GD in my last pregnancy and placed on insulin, though my numbers were pretty reasonable at all times except a fasting am- I tended to spike when I didn't eat enough, as opposed to as a result of eating the wrong things. I also would have blood sugar spikes when I didn't have enough carbs, as I was restricting a little more than I needed to. In my case, I should have advocated for ongoing testing at home to avoid a diagnosis and medication- as well as to avoid the induction (a must at 38 weeks in that practice with any GD pregnancy.)

This time, I declined all screening for GD, agreeing instead to self monitor. I'm very aware of what I'm eating and what it is doing to my levels, and the pregnancy is much less complicated. I haven't developed the polyhydramnios I did last time, and also have not had a premature rupture of membranes as a result. Being proactive and closely tracking leaves me feeling a lot more in control, and also teaches me to be more in tune with my body and how I respond to different foods.
 

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Definitely ask that they allow you to monitor your numbers at home. At the same time, keep a food diary where you write down EVERYTHING you put in your mouth, times and the test results and times. That will really help you to see if you have a problem and what specifically may be causing it.

My MW also highly recommended lentils to me - not only are they a great source of protein, but they're really good at helping to stabilize BS levels.
 
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