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Failed my one hour Glucose.....

951 Views 9 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  umsami
29 weeks, 3 days and I failed the test 2 weeks ago. My number was 184, at one hour after drinking the cola-crap. Apparently the range is 120-140. FYI, I didn't eat anything for about 4 hours prior.

So now I'm supposed to take the 3 hour test. Dr's office won't compromise and let me do a week of finger pricks or anything.

How do I pass this thing? I need to take it in the next three days and have the results sent to the dr (as per dr.)

If I refuse the test I'm automatically labelled "high risk" and have to birth in a hospital, so I have to take the stupid test. And what would my syptoms be if I did have gd?

Off to look at the archives......
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recommendation is to carb load in 3 days before you take the test so on the day that you show up fasting for the test your body is ready for the high sugars of the test - some docs no longer give instructions on carb-loading previous to the test because they assume that moms eat alot of sugar all the time--
150 grams of carbs/day on the days prior to a 3 hour GTT to prevent any sort of"surprise" effect on your body. this is what the studies in the 70's done on about 1000 women was based on women loading carbs before the test in addition in the 90's the 3 hr abnormal tests were not reproducible in 25% of the women they repeated the test on within a week..... they thought it was because of the "stress" of the test that caused the abnormal response the first 3 hr test.

my dh has been on a low carb diet for a long time now and he keeps his carbs to about 30 gm/day so I guess he would not pass a 3hr GGT if asked to take it
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I second the 3 days of carbo-loading. You might also want to walk as much as possible before and during the test - exercise can help.

Collect research that shows that GD testing and treatment does not really improve outcomes (that is, even if you have GD and they 'treat' you, it won't make a difference). There's good info here.
For the 3-hour test, the cut-off (highest possible normal) values are:
Hour 0 = 95 mg/dl (5.3 mmol/l)
Hour 1 = 180 mg/dl (10 mmol/l)
Hour 2 = 155 mg/dl (8.6 mmol/l)
Hour 3 = 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/l)

And at least 2 of these 4 levels have to be too high for them to diagnose you. Apparently, most women who "fail" the 1-hour test wind up passing the 3-hour test.

Are you planning to give birth at home? Why is a drs office involved? I'm sort of confused on that front. If you have a MW, can't you just refuse the 3-hour test?
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Anguschick1
29 weeks, 3 days and I failed the test 2 weeks ago. My number was 184, at one hour after drinking the cola-crap. Apparently the range is 120-140. FYI, I didn't eat anything for about 4 hours prior.

So now I'm supposed to take the 3 hour test. Dr's office won't compromise and let me do a week of finger pricks or anything.

How do I pass this thing? I need to take it in the next three days and have the results sent to the dr (as per dr.)

If I refuse the test I'm automatically labelled "high risk" and have to birth in a hospital, so I have to take the stupid test. And what would my syptoms be if I did have gd?

Off to look at the archives......

That number is high. I wanted a home birth also, but for me, this is not possible due to medical reasons, so I understand your frustration. Your level of 180 is quite high, as 120 is ideal (or so I read somewhere.)

The risks for having pregnancy for both mommy and baby can be dangerous. I did a search for you on google because I only know of a few side effects from it. http://www.ehealthmd.com/library/dia...PG_affect.html

Good luck with the diet. If in fact the diet does work for you to pass the glucose test, PLEASE be careful during your pregnancy and stick wit ha healthy eating plan geared to diabetics. Eat smal frequent meals with snacks, eat fruits and veggies, avoid processed sugar, avoid salt, get active (take walks etc.) In the mornings - blood sugar is it's highest - so avoid a high carb breakfast, and have a night snack with protien...

The best of luck to you!
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Quote:

Originally Posted by nancy926
Collect research that shows that GD testing and treatment does not really improve outcomes (that is, even if you have GD and they 'treat' you, it won't make a difference). There's good info here.
I checked out that site and it actually says that treating GD DOES make a difference.
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See the recent study -

6/13/05

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Treating women who develop diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) reduces the rate of serious complications without increasing the rate of cesarean delivery, new research shows.

Although the risks related to gestational diabetes are well known, it has been unclear if screening and treatment to lower maternal blood sugar levels can reduce these risks, Dr. Caroline A. Crowther and her associates comment in their report, published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

The Journal released the article early to coincide with the authors' presentation at the American Diabetes Association meeting in San Diego.

To evaluate the effects of treating gestational diabetes, Crowther, with the University of Adelaide in Australia, and her associates studied women with signs of gestational diabetes between 24 and 34 weeks into pregnancy.

By random draw, a total of 490 women were assigned to intensive treatment, including dietary advice, blood sugar monitoring, and insulin therapy, the authors note. Another 510 patients were assigned to routine care.

Serious complications among the infants -- death, shoulder impeding delivery, bone fracture, and nerve palsy -- were significantly more frequent in the routine-care group (4 percent versus 1 percent) after accounting for factors such as maternal age, race or ethnic group, and number of previous pregnancies.

A higher percentage of infants in the intervention group were admitted to the neonatal nursery (71 percent versus 61 percent), and women in the intervention group were more likely to undergo labor induction (39 percent versus 29 percent), both of which the investigators attribute to the treating physicians' knowledge of their gestational diabetes.

The rates of cesarean section were similar in the two groups.

At three months after delivery, women in the intervention group had lower rates of depression and higher scores on quality of life scales.

The report "provides some long-awaited evidence to support the use of screening and treatment for women at risk," Drs. Michael F. Greene and Caren G. Solomon, from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, write in an accompanying editorial.

SOURCE: The New England Journal of Medicine, June 16, 2005.
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I'm having a homebirth w/a group of doctors. I had a medwife w/ds and the only way that dh would be supportive of a homebirth w/the wee bitty was to go w/this group. I would have preferred a midwife at home, but I'll take the dr group as long as I can get the homebirth.

So, I should be carb-loading today? Ok, that makes sense. I don't normally eat refined sugar, certainely not on an empty stomach and definetly not w/out some sort of activity involved (think cake / ice cream at a picnic or party where I'm chasing around ds). I'm assuming that because this three hour test is so much more accurate that it's more likely to take into account how my individual body works and not just how I fit on a chart? (Breastfed vs Formula fed babies' growth charts come to mind.)

Another annoyance - stupid dr wants the results back Monday/Tuesday (so we can address it asap if it needs addressing) so I have to take the test tomorrow at 9am. How am I supposed to not eat in the morning - I'm a huge crab until I get my tea/english muffin or smoothie and some time to decompress. And now I won't really be able to eat until 12 or later (depends on if the lab is on time or not). This sucks. Ok - pity party over.

I have three of Henci Goer's articles and I'm perusing those today....
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You might want to check out Sarah Buckley's response to a question at "Experts Q&A" at MDC's website. I did a search for "gestational diabetes" and found this response. Some of the links and references are worth the read. This question is the last on the page.


Sending warm thoughts to all you moms-to-be.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by gotmilkmama
I checked out that site and it actually says that treating GD DOES make a difference.

Oops...maybe I didn't read far enough...or was in a pregnancy fog. Sorry about that.
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You failed the 1-hour.... so it's time for the 3-hour. NO big deal. Really. The goal is not to somehow fool the 3-hour and pass...the goal is to have a healthy baby.

Yes...walking during the test will help.... but if you have GD, it probably won't make that much difference. You'll still be diagnosed. That's a good thing. Why?? Having uncontrolled blood sugars during pregnancy and labor can put your child at risk. If you fail, you'll first meet with a nutritionist to work on a diet to try... and will be told to monitor your blood sugars using the whole finger-prick monitor thingy. Typically, they look at fasting (under 100), and one-hour post-prandial (meal) blood sugars (under 135 or so). If you can get your blood sugars within range using diet and exercise, than that's what you'll do.

If not, you'll either be put on insulin (not as bad as it sounds, really)...or possibly one of the oral diabetes drugs...which are being used now more frequently. (Although I'm not 100% comfortable that they've been studied enough.)

You'll also most likely have more frequent ultrasounds and fetal monitoring as your pregnancy progresses.

During labor your blood sugar will be monitored as well... and your baby's blood sugar will be checked upon birth.

Controlling blood glucose levels do make a difference in the outcome for your baby. Uncontrolled can lead to C-sections due to baby's size, breathing problems for the baby, and even fetal death.

Better to take care of the gestational diabetes...even if you have to have a vaginal hospital birth... rather than leave it uncontrolled and end up with a C-section. If you can control your blood sugars well, you may be able to work out a home birth plan with your midwife/OB. Never know.

Peace.
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