Mothering Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,810 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I failed my 1 hour GTT this morning pretty badly with a 162. I am very healthy, have only gained 13lbs the whole pregnancy BUT do have a very strong family history of diabetes. I however had a nice normal range number with my first DS so this came out of left field. I have to take the 3 hour on Monday so I have 3 days to do whatever it takes to pass this test. Any tips or advice? Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,093 Posts
I'm not sure that three days is long enough to change your body's reaction to sugars but it's certainly worth I try. The only thing that I can think of is to start a diet that would be prescribed anyways if they determine that you have GD. My SIL had the same problem, and I believe failed the 3 hour test. She start the Brewer diet and was so much healthie during and after her pregnancy. Before that she wasn't eating enough protein because she didn't eat meat. The diet stabilized her blood sugar very well and was all she needed to "manage" her GD. Really once she started eating right I don't think she had any symptoms anymore. Hopefully someone with a little more knowledge will chime in here, too, but I hope that helps a little.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,074 Posts
I failed my 1hr test, which totally shocked me. Forgot what my failing # was. I put off scheduling the 3hr test and got an earful from my doctor. He guaranteed that I would fail the 3 hr test and told me I was risking fetal death. I'd tell you what I think of him, but it's not kosher here. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><br><br>
Anyway, there's research for and against cutting all forms of sugar before the test. I think I cut mine back, but not dramatically. What I did might be cheating but here goes: nothing really special for the first reading. Maybe a walk before the test and plenty of water. But between the hour draws, I went for hard, long walks. I walked my ass off to burn that sugar! Don't know how much of an effect that had, but I passed!<br><br>
Apparently the 1 hr test is not very accurate. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
It's not about passing the test. It's about identifying if you are in fact having elevated blood sugars.<br><br>
85% of glucolas come back normal with the three hour GTT, BTW.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
560 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">It's not about passing the test. It's about identifying if you are in fact having elevated blood sugars.</td>
</tr></table></div>
Absolutely! You should not try to "fake" the results. If you really do have sugar issues, you need to know so that you can correct it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
Are you experiencing symptoms of gd? Did you have a urine test that showed sugars present? Have you experience dizziness, blurred vision, or altered mental state during your pregnancy? Are you retaining excessive water? Does your uterus measure large for dates(I mean really large and consistently)? If the answer to all of these is no, then I'd suggest you refuse the second test. You may get an earful from your doctor, but without any symptoms, why would you need a test? GD, real GD can open the door to serious complications, but so can excessive prenatal testing and unnecessary medical intervention. I'm not sure how your test was done, but many of them, especially the longer tests use such large amounts of sugar that it is almost impossible to come up with a negative result. I'm sure there are those who will disagree with me, but the fact is serious diseases generally have symptoms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>kathan12904</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13266970"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Are you experiencing symptoms of gd? Did you have a urine test that showed sugars present? Have you experience dizziness, blurred vision, or altered mental state during your pregnancy? Are you retaining excessive water? Does your uterus measure large for dates(I mean really large and consistently)? If the answer to all of these is no, then I'd suggest you refuse the second test. You may get an earful from your doctor, but without any symptoms, why would you need a test? GD, real GD can open the door to serious complications, but so can excessive prenatal testing and unnecessary medical intervention. I'm not sure how your test was done, but many of them, especially the longer tests use such large amounts of sugar that it is almost impossible to come up with a negative result. I'm sure there are those who will disagree with me, but <b>the fact is serious diseases generally have symptoms.</b></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
No. You're wrong.<br><br>
Hypertension does not have symptoms. Diabetes (type II or GDM) does nto have symptoms until late in the disease. Most illnesses do not have symptoms until far into the disease process.<br><br>
Spilling sugar in your urine in pregnancy means nothing. The kidneys are leaky in pregnancy. Conversely, you can have high blood sugars and no urine sugar at all. Dizziness, blurred vision and altered mental state are not symptoms of GDM. Large for dates becomes an issue in the third trimester, not prior to the standard 28 week glucose screen.<br><br>
I had GDM -- REAL GDM, whatever that means -- and in fact was insulin-dependent for the last ten weeks of my pregnancy. I had none of the above symptoms, which are all associated either with extreme hyperglycemia or with advanced disease. You do not have GDM long enough to get the vascular damage that leads to most symptoms of non-GDM DM.<br><br>
I'm sorry. You're just wrong on this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
560 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I'm sure there are those who will disagree with me, but the fact is serious diseases generally have symptoms.</td>
</tr></table></div>
I'll be the first to disagree.<br>
GD often doesn't have the same symptoms as "regular" diabetes. Pregnancy can mask many classic diabetes symptoms. Regardless of whether you want to have the GTT or check post parandial and fasting blood sugars at home with a glucometer, there should be some follow up to the abnormal level. Ignoring the elevated GLT all together seems short sighted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,647 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>maxmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13267694"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">No. You're wrong.<br><br>
Hypertension does not have symptoms. Diabetes (type II or GDM) does nto have symptoms until late in the disease. Most illnesses do not have symptoms until far into the disease process.<br><br>
Spilling sugar in your urine in pregnancy means nothing. The kidneys are leaky in pregnancy. Conversely, you can have high blood sugars and no urine sugar at all. Dizziness, blurred vision and altered mental state are not symptoms of GDM. Large for dates becomes an issue in the third trimester, not prior to the standard 28 week glucose screen.<br><br>
I had GDM -- REAL GDM, whatever that means -- and in fact was insulin-dependent for the last ten weeks of my pregnancy. I had none of the above symptoms, which are all associated either with extreme hyperglycemia or with advanced disease. You do not have GDM long enough to get the vascular damage that leads to most symptoms of non-GDM DM.<br><br>
I'm sorry. You're just wrong on this.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
What is your opinion of checking your sugar levels at home, as opposed to doing the GTT?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,731 Posts
Can you get your hands on a copy of <span style="text-decoration:underline;"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FUnderstanding-Diagnostic-Tests-Childbearing-Year%2Fdp%2F1891145568%2Fref%3Dpd_bbs_sr_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26s%3Dbooks%26qid%3D1235708419%26sr%3D8-1" target="_blank">Understanding Diagnostic Tests in the Childbearing Year</a></span> by Anne Frye? Borrow it? University bookstore? Get it overnighted from Amazon?<br><br>
The fact is, the one hour GTT has a high rate of false positives. The 3hr GTT is better, but false positives are still a concern.<br><br>
Anne Frye posits that there is no way to "fool" the test if you are indeed diabetic; but if you are accustomed to a good diet, and then you get slammed with glucola overload, it is normal and expected that your pancreas will not keep up. She outlines what pre-test carb loading is, and what you can expect from it. She says that carb-loading and exercising during the test can give a more accurate reading--not that you will "fool" the test, but that you will get more useful information.<br><br>
If you decide to order the book, you may want to reschedule your test to give yourself an extra day or two to get more accurate results.<br><br>
Alternately, have you considered finger sticks as an alternative method of evaluating your blood sugar? Ask your careprovider about it.<br><br>
The information is important--diabetes is a serious condition and it does involve risks to mother and baby--but a false diagnosis also involves risks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,492 Posts
if you do the Sullivan test it is recommended that you carb load for atleast 3 days preceding the test by adding 100 gm of sugar to your diet- then be sure that you are fasting on the day of the test for that first draw- fasting no more than 12 hrs and no less than 8 hrs- so no coffee, no juice, no flavored water- no sugar free- drinks --- truly fasting - you can drink water - this is the recommended protocol when it was first being figured out they found out that adding the carbs before hand reduced the number of false positives --
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>channelofpeace</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13267737"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">What is your opinion of checking your sugar levels at home, as opposed to doing the GTT?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Here's what the GTT does: it stresses your pancreas to roughly simulate what you will be able to do at 32 weeks, when your placental hormones peak and diabetes tends to be its worst.<br><br>
If you want to commit to checking your blood sugar multiple times a day every week until term, you could, but just to avoid a wretched three-hour test (and yes, I do know how much it sucks)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
465 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>maxmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13267814"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">If you want to commit to checking your blood sugar multiple times a day every week until term, you could, but just to avoid a wretched three-hour test (and yes, I do know how much it sucks)?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I did. And I was happy with that choice. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/innocent.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shy">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,731 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ChampagneBlossom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13267856"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I did. And I was happy with that choice. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/innocent.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shy"></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Me too. It wasn't my favorite, but it was better than all that a GD diagnosis entails.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,810 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm taking the 3 hour. If I truly have GD I obviously want to know. I am measuring right on for dates, I've only gained 13lbs (I'm 28.5 weeks), and I have NO swelling. I do get dizzy, that's probably the only symptom. I have not spilled sugar in any of my urine checks. I pretty much eat the GD diet as it is and will only have to make a few changes. I'll have to cut out OJ which I love and the occasional sweet. Make sure I'm having protein with my fruit and carbs (we eat all whole wheat bread, whole grain pasta and brown rice anyway). Both my parents are diabetic. I've also been very unactive this pregnancy b/c of my miscarriages. I've been afraid to exercise and am now realizing that was not such a good idea so I'm going to start walking again, slowly. I will make sure I eat enough carbs the next 3 days, they can be complex carbs though right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,492 Posts
well if you are eating say 2000 calories a day about 200-250gm of carbs a day normally recommended(for an average mom/not on GD diet)- then add that extra 100 gms of carb for 3 days -- yes complex carbs are preferable for your daily intake and the added it doesn't matter as much but if it is what you have on hand and want to eat/able to eat.<br>
take care
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,881 Posts
Honestly, I'd probably like to see you gaining more than 13lb, especially now at 28 weeks when your blood volume increase is peaking.<br><br>
I would recommend eating the Brewer diet starting now regardless of whether you pass the GTT. That's not cheating, it's just focusing on better nutrition and working to make sure your liver isn't being overtaxed.<br><br>
Best wishes...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,233 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mamallama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13267769"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br>
Anne Frye posits that there is no way to "fool" the test if you are indeed diabetic; but if you are accustomed to a good diet, and then you get slammed with glucola overload, it is normal and expected that your pancreas will not keep up. She outlines what pre-test carb loading is, and what you can expect from it. <b>She says that carb-loading and exercising during the test can give a more accurate reading--not that you will "fool" the test, but that you will get more useful information.</b></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I'm not a birth professional, but I just wanted to tell you that this is what I did and I passed my 3 hr test with flying colors! It actually indicated that I was hypoglycemic, not diabetic. I drank lots of water and walked moderately during the first hour of the test and took plenty of rest breaks. I walked a little harder for the second and third hours of the test. It was springtime when I took the test, so I walked in the neighborhood behind the facility that tested me.<br><br>
If you do decide to take the 3 hr. test, it's a good idea to bring something to eat to the testing facility, so you can eat before you go home. I felt a little woozy toward the end of the test and was glad I had some cereal and milk to eat before I drove myself home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,810 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>busybusymomma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13269623"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Honestly, I'd probably like to see you gaining more than 13lb, especially now at 28 weeks when your blood volume increase is peaking.<br><br>
I would recommend eating the Brewer diet starting now regardless of whether you pass the GTT. That's not cheating, it's just focusing on better nutrition and working to make sure your liver isn't being overtaxed.<br><br>
Best wishes...</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I've been trying very hard to gain more weight, that's why this whole change is throwing me even more for a loop. I have no clue how in the world I"m going to gain weight on the GD diet. Before, I switched to full fat dairy, I started eating meat again, anything with lots of fat and calories. I just am not packing it on this time. I gained 32lbs easily with DS1 but this time it's just not happening. I was very sick for the first 15 weeks, and now again in the 3rd trimester food is just not tasting good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,149 Posts
Not a birth pro, either, but I did have GD with my second pregnancy. My first was fine, I gained 39 pounds during that pregnancy and passed my GD test.<br><br>
My second I was struggling to gain weight. After I failed the 3 hour test the dietitian I saw told me I wasn't eating enough calories. Before I had the test and then before I could see the dietitian and learn how to eat a GD diet I felt progressively worse. I had no energy and whenever I would do anything, such as loading the dish washer, I would get what felt like lactic acid burn in all of my muscles. By the time I started to test my blood sugar and use the ketostix (urine sticks in the a.m.) I was spilling huge keytones. It took me a couple of weeks to get those under control but once I did I felt such a difference.<br><br>
My dad and sister have diabetes so I understood about their diet but I needed to learn about eating for GD. Once I got the hang of it and started eating 2,200 calories a day I felt so much better. Overall, I was able to gain about 20 pounds with my second pregnancy. One of the best tips I learned was not to eat fruit or milk before lunch - that it would elevate my blood sugars.<br><br>
Testing my BS four times a day was a hassle and following the diet took practice but it made a huge difference. I'm pregnant with my third and my OB said we won't even bother doing any of the sugar tests. I'm just testing four times a day and eating my diet again and am doing great.<br><br>
Best wishes!
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top