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My dd gets her report card today, the last day of her 2nd grade year. She has struggled so far her 3 years of formal schooling. At her school picnic yesterday her teacher told me she is reading at a 16 score, which is first grade level. They are passing her to the 3rd grade. Her math is somewhat improving, she has amazingly grasped the concept of multiplication very quicky and is doing well, her answers are wrong usually due to number reversals (see my dyslexic post)
I'm at a complete loss on what to do. Her school does this thing called looping, which means her teacher this year will be her 3rd grade teacher too, unless we opted out of it, which we didn't, since her teacher knows her so well and where she is academically.
All the early intervention, reading recovery, tutoring (private and through the school programs) testing....Arggg!!!

I guess we are going to get her privately tested for dyslexia and explore ADD through a complete physical. Both her counselor and teacher and I feel the gut instinct 'something' else is going on.
Soooooooooooooooo frustrating! I am tempted to just pull her out of public school and try to homeschool her for a year or two to catch her up, but now I'm working (I used to be SAHM) and her dad probably wouldn't go for that.
Thanks for reading, this is long I know. I'm just so sad for my happy little girl who does love school and loves to learn. I'm so worried about her.
 

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I'd look at it this way... things are going slowly, but they are going ahead, right? The teacher is interested in your child and her learning. You are getting some clues to explain what's going on. She's enjoying school, and it is something that fits into your family's life right now.

Sometimes it gets me down a bit that my dd and ds don't top their classes in academic subjects. On the other hand, the choir director tells me how much she adores my daughter. My son was "star of the week" one time for "helping others". I find the school community really supportive and sympathetic when I'm having troubles and extremely stimulating when I'm in search of a new project. We all like the school and the community it provides.

All those early intervention programs still depend a lot on parents, but they also provide great structure for you to work with your dd. Without them, you'd be the one doing the research to figure out how to best address the things you see in her learning. With them, you have another adult partner who can work with you and your dd. You don't have to buy into the programs completely...if you think something isn't working, the teachers will want to know and they'll want to know why. You can draw on their expertise, but you'll still be doing a lot of the work and providing them with feedback so everyone can work to support your dd's learning.

The real key to me is this: Do you like the support team and can you work with them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Bestjob, yes we love the support team and have worked well with them. DD went to K at a charter school, so this was her second year at this public school.
She is moving forward, yes. Just very slowly.
I try to take the good stuff and look at the big picture too. She is a great artist and loves to sing and helps others, is kind to her classmates. The teachers, counselor and principal all comment that she is a joy to have there and is 'so cute' and 'bubbly' and full of life! They adore and respect her spirit and have even said they want to preserve that.

We'll see how the summer goes.
 

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You said you have had a lot of testing done. Has there been recent testing to figure out how she learns and why it is more slowly? I am thinking of a wonderful book I read by Mel Levine called All Kinds of Minds. It goes into many, many different ways that we all learn, how our memories work, how we process information, etc, etc. I learned so much about myself and my kids and where they do well and struggle. If someone with this kind of expertise could evaluate your dd, you would know exactly how the teachers had to teach to her to get the most learning going.

I'm sorry this is happening for you. It is so hard as moms to watch this sort of thing and not know what to do!
 

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I just want to say keep trying. My dsd, now 15, has always had difficulties with most subjects, especially reading and math. She ended up being promoted to 3rd but had to be put back into 2nd after a few weeks. After the end of that year she was still not ready for 3rd and was put in a small private school ( strong on religion, not academics) that put her in the 1-2nd grade level and basically never did anything to find out what was going on. The family had to move and she entered public school in a mid-size city, before was very rural and I think just didn't have the resources. She entered 6th grade on a 2nd grade reading level. She was put in several special classes with lots of one-on-one help. By 7th grade she was on a 4th grade level. Now, entering high school she's going to be completely mainstreamed. I still don't know the details but whatever the middle school did has changed her life. IF she would have been left in the private school I'm sure she would have gone through life reading at the 2nd grade level.
 

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Don't panic! Reading at a first grade level at the end of second grade doesn't sound too bad to me - there's bound to be a continuum of where kids are at on these things, and so long as she is moving forward, there's no big reason to worry about her development. The only thing I would be concerned about is the school's ability/willingness to ensure that she receives the kind of attention and assistance she needs to move forward at her own pace, i.e. is everything tailored to other kids' pace or do they allow space for individual progress. One thing that sometimes happens when kids don't learn a particular skill 'on schedule' is that schools ensure they remain 'stuck' on that skill and don't let them work around it. If she likes multiplication, is the school letting her do that, or are they saying 'you can't do X until you learn Y'? I think that's the only way in which learning at a different pace can be damaging. Kids are all different, and can't be expected to all move forward with each skill/aptitude with lockstep precision, right?

It sounds like she is gifted in other areas, like art, music, and emotional intelligence. That's wonderful and worth capitalizing on - maybe over the summer you can do literacy activities together that tap into these strengths!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by mammastar2
Don't panic! Reading at a first grade level at the end of second grade doesn't sound too bad to me - there's bound to be a continuum of where kids are at on these things, and so long as she is moving forward, there's no big reason to worry about her development.
You know, that's a really going point often overlooked. Realistically, for every 5 year old reading Harry Potter there is going to be an 8 year old who can't read well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes they did testing and they just said there is no discrepancy between what she knows and what she is showing she knows, so they are confused too, but have said that she does have the focus issue and tried to resolve some of it by letting her sit close to the teacher. They think it's a concentration thing, that she just is too distracted in the classroom. Which makes sense, she does well at home (except when brother is being bothersome to her) on academics with just us.
Her reading level is a 16 and I believe 18 is the lowest of the 2nd grade level, correct me if I am wrong? So, she is close, and I guess it's not too bad when you think about it. Plus, she has a May birthday, not that it's an early one but she did just turn 8, so it's a bit early. I have a December one and just missed the cut off for here in our state, so I was six when I started K and was one of the oldest, so I didn't even start reading until I was almost 7 in first grade. I did well and love to read. I do think it's in the timing too, I've heard from a few parents that sometimes things just 'click' in 3rd grade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
ETA
I meant that I was *almost* six when I started K. and therefore nearly 7 when I started first grade, reading, etc.
My son just had a major tantrum...(distracted myself)!
 

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Your daughter sounds so much like our son. He just finished first grade. We also knew something wasn't right but it wasn't anything we could pin down.
We took him to a neuropsychologist for testing. The scope of the testing that they did was astounding. We paid $2300 for the testing. Paying it was like a punch in the gut but we at least have some answers.
His issue is with executive functioning. Kids with this problem have trouble seeing "the big picture". They have difficulty organizing their thoughts. Around 4th grade they really start to struggle because they start getting projects assigned. They usually struggle until junior high and hit a brick wall.
The neuropsychologist said that he would have just "flown under the radar" at school because he is making progress. It's just really slow.
I will be taking a specialized tutoring class in the fall that will teach me how to help him(as well as any child with learning difficulties.)
One of the ways that kids learn to cope and feel organized in their brain is to become methodical. My son has to brush his teeth in the morning before putting his shoes on.
HTH
 
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