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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We recently found out that my older daughter is allergic to fish and gluten, and probably cow dairy (seems ok with small amounts of butter or goat milk products). My baby is showing signs of an egg allergy so I'm going to have to cut that out of my diet while she's nursing.

Life is hectic and money is tight! I need some help finding healthy, filling, and palatable meals that won't have me in the kitchen all day. I'd prefer not to make different meals for each person and my husband was already dragging his feet (he's trying) before we found out about the alleriges. Ack!

We just got 15 frozen pasture-raised chickens and are getting 15 lbs of grass-fed ground beef.

Thanks!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by MummaMel View Post
We recently found out that my older daughter is allergic to fish and gluten, and probably cow dairy (seems ok with small amounts of butter or goat milk products). My baby is showing signs of an egg allergy so I'm going to have to cut that out of my diet while she's nursing.

Life is hectic and money is tight! I need some help finding healthy, filling, and palatable meals that won't have me in the kitchen all day. I'd prefer not to make different meals for each person and my husband was already dragging his feet (he's trying) before we found out about the alleriges. Ack!

We just got 15 frozen pasture-raised chickens and are getting 15 lbs of grass-fed ground beef.

Thanks!
Just a question, are you giving the baby the whole egg, or just the yolk? Usually an allergy is caused by a foreign protein. Since the yolk is fat it shouldn't cause much if any of an allergic reaction.

You can still cook alot of nice things. Meaty bone soups with vegetables, and gluten free grains for the win :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by NoTiGG View Post
Just a question, are you giving the baby the whole egg, or just the yolk? Usually an allergy is caused by a foreign protein. Since the yolk is fat it shouldn't cause much if any of an allergic reaction.

You can still cook alot of nice things. Meaty bone soups with vegetables, and gluten free grains for the win :p
NoTiGG- just the yolks. But I'm pretty sure that the yolks have some protein. Anyway, I'm fairly confident in my home-diagnosis
. I'm just hoping for some meal and snack suggestions from families who eat tradition foods and have allergy issues.

Anyone?
 

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you can try the recipes on www.paleofood.com...all of them are milk and gluten (and grain ) free and some oare eggfree as well.

And just an aside...lactose intolerance secondary to gluten allergy is very common. If you get the gluten eliminated and the gut healed, very often you can go back to dairy...it's called transient leaky gut syndrom....

Good luck

tanya
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, Tanya!
No one, even the pediatrician, can explain why the cow milk would cause symptoms and not show on the allergy test. I feel like I'm a hamster wheel of doing research to figure it all out on my own. My guess was that maybe she was missing some enzymes needed to digest dairy, but the transient leaky gut thing makes a lot of sense. So, basically, because of the damage done by the gluten, the milk molecules are making their way into her bloodstream? She had some body odor before removing gluten and diary so that makes a lot of sense.

I can't find any info online about *transient* leaky gut syndrome. Where can I read more?
 

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Actually, lactose intolerance is secondary to celiac disease/gluten intolerance-- *not* a wheat allergy. CD and wheat allergy are each governed by different antibodies.

Most folks allergic to wheat are allergic to other proteins in wheat (prolamins, albumen, etc). A handful are allergic to gluten, primarily folks with anaphylactic wheat allergies.

Celiac disease results in gut damage due to an autoimmune reaction to gluten.

Was your child tested for celiac disease? The permeability/damage to the gut can result in actual food allergies developing. Sometimes they resolve on a GF diet, sometimes not.

The lactose intolerance is caused by damage to the villi. The enzymes we need to digest lactose are produced at the tips of the villi in the small intestine. If the villi are damaged, we can't digest lactose. If they're *really* damaged, the part that helps process fructose is also kaput, so some folks have a fructose intolerance.

The good news? Those villi grow back with the proper diet.
 
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