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I have a 21 month old that still nurses frequently, and through the night. I know that night nursing is not linked to cavities, and that it is more likely a mixture of food and the breastmilk- which can be more potent towards tooth decay than sugary foods alone, or an inhereted problem, but I think my dd has at least one, maybe more cavities. We brush her teeth at least 2 times a day, in the morning and evening after she eats her last bit of food. She does not eat much sugar, she drinks no milk other than mine- I am just at a loss. I feel so sad <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> I am scared to take her to a dentist that will reprimand me for nursing her at night, I am scared of what they would do to her to fix it, I do not want her to have capped teeth for the next 4+ years of her life until her baby teeth fall out. Is there any way I can reverse this? What I see does not look awful- but I can tell her molars do not look like they should, and one has a tiny black spot that does not come off with brushing. My other 4 y/o dd did not night nurse this long and she has no problems with her teeth.<br><br>
Thanks for listening.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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My oldest son night-nursed until 26 months, and he also had a couple of dark spots on his baby teeth. I was really concerned when I took him to the dentist, but it turns out they were stains, not cavities. He did develop a cavity around age 4, but they "watched" it and only filled it last year at age 6. So...even if your daughter has cavities, I don't think they would need caps unless they were really bad. Your best bet might be to take her to the dentist soon, so that if they are cavities, they aren't yet at the point where more dramatic work is needed. There is also a thread in "Dental" about healing cavities with nutrition.<br><br>
If you are that concerned about what the dentist will say about the night nursing, you can always keep it to yourself. Or you can say that your pediatrician recommends it, or that you've decided the benefits outweigh the risks.
 
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