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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there
I have a few children that have attended a waldorf school prior to a move that now makes that impossible. we are using a waldorf curriculum that we really like.
My question is, I will have a first grader next year but she is reading pretty well. I'm wondering how schools handle this?
Chandi
 

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Yes. Sorry, I was in a hurry and should have made myself more clear.
my now second grader wasn't reading fluently in First grade so it wasn't an issue. My now Kindergartener is working at a first grade level and is now reading (self taught) My concern is that the first grade curriculum will be boring too her because the emphasis is on capital letters and writing both she is doing quite well.
I am hesistant to move her too 2nd grade though. SHe is rather small for her age and very socially sensitive.

Chandi
 

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Am I reading correctly that you are now homeschooling? One major benefit I see of homeschooling is that one can tailor the curriculum to fit an individual child. How exactly you would keep the social/emotional feel of first grade and incorporate more advanced academics I am not sure. But certainly it can be done.
 

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it really depends upon the teacher and school too. at one school, a precocious kid was really disrupting class with his reading (kind of showing off) and had other behavioral issues (related to his diagnosed disorder), and his parents were really "taken to task" about it. i can't relay all of the facts because i wasn't there, but ultimately they sent him to a different school that met his special needs where waldorf couldn't.

but otherwise, kids who teach themselves--at least at the schools here and there where i was--tend not to worry if it is early, so long as the kids go along with the program as it is. it may be ok for her, it may not be. it really depends upon the kid and the teacher, you know?

anyway, think about it, see what works.
 

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Like zoebird says, I think it's really dependent on not only the school but even the individual teacher and the class itself.

My daughter is in class one and has been self taught at reading for a couple of years now. She has also known the letters and sounds and writing since she was about 2.5. However, she hasn't been bored at school as there is a depth to officially learning these things that she appreciates and she enjoys the practice.
Saying that our class one class is doing reading and writing sentences already. Our amazing teacher who is very Steiner/Waldorf and very experienced also happens to be very sensitive to the needs of her class and has flexed to what the kids demand to learn. Not by them saying mind you but by what she has observed. It is a very mature class one and she has altered the curriculum to suit that. They are all very much enjoying what they do and it's right for them.

In our years at a Steiner school I have never encountered any outright disapproval or discouraging of a child reading or writing at all. It was never emphasized or encouraged either before class one but again was not looked upon negatively. We also tend to get a lot of kids who come to our school after they give mainstream a try and realize it's not a good fit so many children have already been taught before, especially kids here can start school as early as age 4 in mainstream.
 

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My oldest daughter was an early self-taught reader, and was reading a lot by the time we did grade one Waldorf homeschooling. She enjoyed the letter stories as much as a child who was not reading, because those stories speak on such a soul level. She was very busy with form drawing, painting, flute, knitting, cooking, gardening, memorization of poems, helping her little sister, and math. She actually didn't love to write, even though she liked to read, so drawing the letters in picture form and modeling them in beeswax and etc. was fun for her ...and when we did go to writing a summary of our tales in the second half of first grade, we just made the sentence summaries a bit more complex.
So, i guess what I am trying to say is that the Waldorf curriculum is first and foremost about the holistic development of the child; that children who are reading should still be placed in with the grade one stories if they are six and a half or seven but you can adjust the academic pieces up as needed; and that there is more to first grade Waldorf than just the reading part.
Hope that helps!
 
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