Mothering Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>Hi -</p>
<p>I am from Germany and not aware with the law for labeling foods. I would love and appreciate some help on that! What other labels besides "organic" are out there? And what is best to avoid besides cornsugar? Is there a way to identify genetically treated foods? Does organic" include it is not genetically treated? Is an "organic" store brand like Vons or even Trader Joes trustworthy? Does anyone know the requirements for the title "organic"? Is ist protected?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Thanks so much!!!!</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
586 Posts
<p>I know that if it is labeled Organic that it cannot include any GMO ingredients in it.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Most anything can be called natural, even if it isn't really that natural at all.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>If it's GMO it is not currently required to be labeled as such, at least that I know of. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>I don't shop Trader Joe's and havene't even heard of the other store.  We do our best to stick with the local co-op but not every place has one, unfortunately.  I try not to get the produce at the big chain stores, the discount warehouse places, because they all look the same- same size, same shape, no scent to it at all.  Makes me suspect that it's probably GMO.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>As far as meat is concerned, I will only get meat from the co-op unless it's chicken; I find that if you luck out and find chicken in a conventional store and the label says it's only 1% retained water, at least you aren't paying $4.00/pound for salt water.  Maybe not the most ethically raised chickens, but that's why we limit our meat intake.  (We have a family of six so trying to budget can be a challenge.) </p>
<p> </p>
<p>At any rate, there aren't too many labeling requirements as I know of it at this point in time.  Most of the more humane, ethical, and/or "green" companies are quite likely to volunteer info, but it's not really required.  Hope that helps!</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,809 Posts
<p>The only way to avoid GMO in this country is buying 100% organic. Anything less, and your pretty much garunteed to be eating GMo corn/soy at the very, very least. The USDA regulates the word "organic" and so any thing labeled "organic" goes through the same regulatory process. Theres no reason to distrust store-brand organic any more than to distrust name-brand organic, IMHO. I don't have  link, but I'm sure if you google USDA organic you can find out the exact requirements for product XYZ. Good luck!!</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,677 Posts
<p>Anything labeled "organic" has to contain the information for which regulating body certified them organic.  It could be CCOF (state - this one is CA state, but other states have other boards), USDA (federal), QAI (International), etc.  The label is only as trustworthy as the regulating body (in other words if the regulating body is "Bob's Organic Standards", I'd want to do a lot of research before taking it at face value).  Organic foods cannot contain any GMO ingredient, but there is a difference between the label "organic" and the label "made with organic ingredients", which can contain a percentage of non-organic ingredients (including GMO). </p>
<p> </p>
<p>Any item containing soy or corn or canola/rapeseed that is not specifically labeled organic or GMO-free can be assumed to be GMO.  Both soy and corn are broken down into all sorts of additives that do not have to be labeled as soy or corn (but sometimes are).  If this concerns you, I suggest looking on the allergy forum for comprehensive lists of the names they can use.  In the US, canola is pretty much just used for oil.  </p>
<p> </p>
<p>So - that's the basics for packaged foods.  If you're shopping at your local farmer's market though, in many places you will find farmers that farm using organic standards, but who cannot label their produce organic because it is not certified.  Certification is a lengthy and expensive process, and many small farms can not afford it.  You can look for signs that say "pesticide free" or "no spray" and spend some time talking to the farmers to get a better idea of what they're doing. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>When it comes to meat though, organic means something totally different.  It only means that the meat was fed an organic diet - for something like beef, in most cases, it is still CAFO.  For chickens, it's still battery caged.  If you want grass-fed/pastured meat, you'll pretty much have to look for it, and it may or may not be organic.  Again, get to know your farmer.  I am not familiar with what the rules are regarding organic labeling and antibiotics in meat. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>For dairy, same as meat, with the addition that the cattle cannot be given RBGH to stimulate milk production. </p>
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top