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No. Can't afford it anyway.


My dc do rock climbing (ropes and all), downhill/cross country skiing, canoeing, kayaking, horseback riding, hiking, etc.
There are so many healthier and beneficial activities to do besides weaponry/fighting.
 

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That's a good question.

I think I would, if my child showed a great deal of interest.

Much like martial arts, fencing is taught with an emphasis on form, discipline, and etiquette (sp?). The goal is never to hurt the opponent when fencing.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by chinaKat
That's a good question.

I think I would, if my child showed a great deal of interest.

Much like martial arts, fencing is taught with an emphasis on form, discipline, and etiquette (sp?). The goal is never to hurt the opponent when fencing.
I agree with chinaKat.

I fenced in high school, and our coach placed a lot of emphasis on etiquette, grace toward your opponent, etc.
 

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Quote:
That's a good question.

I think I would, if my child showed a great deal of interest.

Much like martial arts, fencing is taught with an emphasis on form, discipline, and etiquette (sp?). The goal is never to hurt the opponent when fencing.
:
 

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I also think of fencing along the lines of the martial arts, and ds takes Tae Kwon Do. At age 6, after 6 months or more of lessons, he truly had NO idea that Tae Kwon Do had anything to do with fighting! The masters emphasize balance and form over any potential combat to the point that ds thought he has just practicing "poses" and "motions." When dh explained that one purpose of Tae Kwon Do is to learn self defense, it helped ds with all of his poses because he finally understood the reason for them. But after almost a year, his masters have never had him go up against anyone- it has been a solitary pursuit for the little guys thus far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
In the interest of full disclosure, I don't have objections to weapon play (certainly I don't push it either, though I will participate) and my 3yo has a set of foam swords, mostly used while playing pirate. I also did a couple semesters of fencing in college and really had a blast.

It's true that fencing isn't about hurting one's opponent. However, it is still simulated combat.

I'm just curious as to where people draw the line, and why. I appreciate the responses and hope to read more
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by darkpear
I'm just curious as to where people draw the line, and why. I appreciate the responses and hope to read more

Over the years I've come to believe that my kids' play is mostly not my business. There is very little a child can totally control, and his fantasy life is one thing I choose to leave alone. I don't think their toys alone will dictate their future level of aggressiveness, and there is just no actual violence anywhere in their real-lfe experience. None of my boys has been obsessed with toy weapons, or has ever spent much time with them, but it has consistently been a type of play they do from time to time. (one exception is ds2 who spent about a year VERY into Peter Pan, and hence a sword)

If one of my kids seemed to have trouble controlling his behavior and it seemed related to the gun play, I'd certainly limit it. We've done that with a couple of video games.

I draw the line at gun play in the house. My boys have toy guns and swords but they all stay outside. Guns, in particular, make me ill. I just don't get the attraction, and I don't want to see it, so outside they go. I've been known to allow a small wooden sword to come in the house (that was for the peter pan kid). I don't allow guns that shoot things out of them, except water and occasionally some foam things. I also don't allow guns that look realistic - so, no black or silver things. Guns also tend to get left in the rain (woops!) or squashed by the van (oops again!). They buy this stuff with their own money.

This is a tough topic. To be honest, it's simpler not to pick the battle, and I haven't seen any negative outcomes from giving them some sovereignty on this issue.
 

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fencing? No. the thought of Kait with a pointed object at her disposal, blunt tipped or otherwise sends shivers down my spine...
Both girls ARE enrolling in gymnastics though, so it's not like there won't be certain routines that comprise elements of duelling, battle or whatever, but they will be poses/movements, not actual weapons. And it's not like they're sheltered. Heck, dh is an artilleryman. The MLRS is nothing if not a rather LARGE gun. they will learn to use weapons properly in the next couple of years. But they will continue to be taught that guns are not toys. weapons in general are not toys. weapons of any sort are for protecting yourself and you family & friends, and occasionally for target/skeet shooting and the like, not for pretend or toys or whatever.

just our .02
 

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Dh fenced in college and is teaching ds (age 7 1/2 years) the art.

Ds also loves archery and has shown a surprising talent for it. We have hay bale targets and he understands that the fencing equipment and the bows and arrows are never to be brought out when he has his friends over. We keep all of it up high & out of sight in the garage.

His friends have asked to play with it, but ds is firm on saying "NO" without any encouragement from us!

He knows he can trust us using the equipment with him, but he can't trust other children to truly understand the very real dangers with these things.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Kaitnbugsmom
fencing? No. the thought of Kait with a pointed object at her disposal, blunt tipped or otherwise sends shivers down my spine...
Both girls ARE enrolling in gymnastics though, so it's not like there won't be certain routines that comprise elements of duelling, battle or whatever, but they will be poses/movements, not actual weapons. And it's not like they're sheltered. Heck, dh is an artilleryman. The MLRS is nothing if not a rather LARGE gun. they will learn to use weapons properly in the next couple of years. But they will continue to be taught that guns are not toys. weapons in general are not toys. weapons of any sort are for protecting yourself and you family & friends, and occasionally for target/skeet shooting and the like, not for pretend or toys or whatever.

just our .02
I respect your opinion, however:
I really don't see how one can be opposed to fencing (or archery), if they are not opposed to teaching their child how to shoot?

In fencing, the sword is not considered a "toy". As in archery, the bow and arrow are not considered toys. To my knowledge.
 

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because hunting and self protection are needed skills. Pointing a sharp piece of metal at someone with a vented face mask on, not so much.

and yes, hunting is necessary. many times the only meat one of my friends can afford is what he can kill himself in the woods behind his house or his bosses lake house. he's too proud to take public assistance and has personal reasons not to join the union.
 

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Okay, well, the hunting thing I get.

Although, I still don't see self defense with a gun as a "needed skill".

I realize if someone has guns in the house, it is probably best that the children learn the proper use of them. I guess it just surprises me that someone who owns guns and will teach shooting, would be so adamantly against fencing.

Just out of pure curiousity, how do you feel about karate and archery?

Not trying to nit-pick with you, just interested in different viewpoints on the topic


FTR, I would probably allow fencing if there was a true desire for it.
 

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I'm not against fencing, i just don't see it as a necessary skill. Of course, I don't see karate as something that is right for everyone either, but my dh is well versed in it and the 5 y/o will be enrolled in classes when she enters 2nd grade if she still wants them {she's starting gymnastics right now after a year of asking/waiting for us to have the $ and the karate is a new desire, still wants to go to gymnastics}

archery is just another form of hunting and sport. Many use it as a competetive sport, the same as most of the other things here, but it is a skill that is useful for sustinance and building self esteem as well as competition. Several of my friends enjoy it. A couple have those hay bale reinforced targets on their property. I've tried it, but prefer something I am more capable with and worry that my ineptness with the bow might result in unintentional injury to other humans or suffering for animals, so I don't do it and stick to what I'm good at.
 
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